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Download Pontius Pilate in History and Interpretation (Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series) eBook

by Helen K. Bond

Download Pontius Pilate in History and Interpretation (Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series) eBook
ISBN:
0521631149
Author:
Helen K. Bond
Category:
Bible Study & Reference
Language:
English
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press; 1st Edition edition (January 28, 1999)
Pages:
276 pages
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1928 kb
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4.4
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This is the first of a series of monograph supplements to the journal New Testament Studi.

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Series: Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series (Book 100)

Series: Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series (Book 100). Hardcover: 276 pages. Publisher: Cambridge University Press (January 28, 1999). Fortunately we have valuable books like Helen K. Bond's "Pontius Pilate In History And are such good tools enabling us to objectively ferret out some of the facts about Pilate's administration,and to sketch a rough profile of just how violent a man he was.

This study reconstructs the life of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor responsible for the execution of Jesus. The first section provides the historical and archaeological background.

The New Testament Concept of Witness (Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series) Pontius Pilate in History and Interpretation. This study reconstructs the historical Pontius Pilate and looks at the way in which he is used as a literary character. Revival Griesbach Hypothes (Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series).

Cambridge Core - Biblical Studies - New Testament - Pontius Pilate in. .The Madness of King Jesus. Text and History in Matthew 2. 6–17. New Testament Studies, Vol. 58, Issue.

Cambridge Core - Biblical Studies - New Testament - Pontius Pilate in History and Interpretation - by Helen K. Bond. Journal for the Study of the New Testament, Vol. 29, Issue.

RBL 11/27/2000 Bond, Helen K. Pontius Pilate in History and Interpretation Society for New Testament Studies Monograph . Pontius Pilate in History and Interpretation Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series 100 Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Robert J. Karris St. Bonaventure University St. Bonaventure, NY 14778. The major aim of Bond's work is to see how this real historical figure (Pontius Pilate) was used by various Jewish and Christian authors of the first century . as a literary character in their writings

Publication: Cambridge, . Cambridge University Press, 1998Description: 249 с. SBN: 0-521-63114-9 Subject: Евреи - История - 168г.

oceedings{Bond1998PontiusPI, title {Pontius Pilate in History and Interpretation}, author {Helen K. Bond}, year {1998} . Bond}, year {1998} }. Helen K. Introduction 1. Pontius Pilate and the Roman Province of Judaea 2. Pilate in Philo 3. Pilate in Josephus 4. Pilate in Mark's Gospel 5. Pilate in Matthew's Gospel 6. Pilate in Luke/Acts 7. Pilate in John's Gospel 8. Historical events behind the gospel narratives Conclusion Bibliography Index. View PDF. Save to Library.

This study reconstructs the historical Pontius Pilate and looks at the way in which he is used as a literary . The next chapters consider the portrayal of Pilate in each gospel, asking how a firstcentury reader would have interpreted his actions.

This study reconstructs the historical Pontius Pilate and looks at the way in which he is used as a literary character in the works of six first-century authors: Philo, Josephus and the four evangelists. Each chapter asks what this portrayal shows about the author's attitude towards the Roman state, and what kind of community found this useful. The first chapter provides an introduction to the history and formation of the imperial Roman province of Judaea.

Free 2-day shipping See our disclaimer. The first full-length scholarly book on Pontius Pilate in English. Society for New Testament Studies Monograph.

The first full-length scholarly book on Pontius Pilate in English. Pontius Pilate In History And Interpretation. Cambridge University Press.

This study reconstructs the life of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor responsible for the execution of Jesus. The first section provides the historical and archaeological background. The following chapters look at six first-century authors: Philo, Josephus and the four gospel writers. Each chapter asks how Pilate is being used as a literary character in each work, why each author describes Pilate in a different way, and what this tells us about the relationship between each author and the Roman state.
  • Friert
This is a very refreshing and compelling study, trenchantly argued and comprehensively researched. Do not believe what the History Channel and other media outlets propound; read and assimilate the facts.
  • Ubranzac
Recent trends in historical Jesus scholarship have tended to see in the
Gospels a tendency to increasingly exculpate, legitimize, and all but beatify
the Romans responsible for the death of Jesus, concomitant with a perceived
agenda to vilify "the Jews",so that "the stern Pilate grows more mellow from
Gospel to Gospel"(Paul Winter,"On The Trial Of Jesus",p.59-60).
Fortunately we have valuable books like Helen K. Bond's "Pontius Pilate
In History And Interpretation"which are such good tools enabling us to
objectively ferret out some of the facts about Pilate's administration,and to
sketch a rough profile of just how violent a man he was.
To begin with the background of the Pilate administration of the Roman
province of Judea,generally regarded as running from 26 to 36/7 C.E.(Jesus
having been put to death probably c.30),Bond points out(p.10)that with the
rise of the principate(27 B.C.E.),provincial governors like Pilate probably
felt compelled to "stress obedience to the emperor at all times".Such a need
to demonstrate his fidelity to his emperor may indeed have been what led
Pilate into several conflicts with his subjects:from seeking to honor Caesar
by bringing his majesty's image into the sacred precincts of Jerusalem(a
violation of Jewish law),to setting up gilded shields bearing Caesar's name
in the Herodian palace,to dedicating buildings to Caesar in Caesaria
Maritima(Pilate's headquarters),and to violently quashing perceived
messianic movements,like that which grew up around the prophet Jesus
of Nazareth,or that which followed an anonymous Samaritan prophet up
Mount Gerizim(Josephus "Judean Antiquities" 18.4.1.85-87).
In addition,and as Bond points out,before 32 C.E. there was no imperial
Legate stationed in Syria,so that the immediate assistance of the Legions
stationed there could not be counted on,and any perceived rebellions had
to be quelled immediately.Such a perception receives strong support from
what we are told about John the Baptist,and his fate at the hands of Herod
Antipas.For the historian Josephus tells us that Antipas reasoned "it best,
by putting him to death,to prevent any mischief he might cause,and not
bring himself into difficulties,by sparing a man who might make him repent
of it when it should be too late"("Judean Antiquities" 18.5.2.118).
And so in Judea, "all was quiet under Tiberius",according to the early
second century report of the Roman historian Tacitus("Histories" 5.9-10).
And of course for nearly half that time,Judea was governed by the other-
wise infamous Pontius Pilate.
When he did make bold moves Pilate seems to have exercised a certain
amount of tact,according to the ancient reports,as when he introduced
Caesar's image in the form of imperial standards into the holy city by night,
so as to present the Jews with a "fait accompli" rather than have his soldiers
face mass demonstrations outside the city gates.And when he did command
violence,Pilate may have sought to minimize fatalities,having his soldiers
use clubs instead of swords,as he did at the time of the Jewish protest over
his decision to use the sacred Temple funds to build an aqueduct for the city
("Judean Antiquities" 18.3.2):(p.58).
Pilate was also capable of backing down in the face of mass protest,
removing the imperial standards from Jerusalem rather than inflict mass
casualties,just as he reportedly had Jesus alone executed and left his
followers unmolested.And when the new Legate did arrive in Syria in 32,
Bond is probably right in supposing that if the Judeans were harboring any
complaints about the Pilate administration up to that time,they probably
would have expressed them now, to Pilate's superior, but none are
reported,while Bond(p.18-9)also supposes that Pilate found in the Jewish
high priest Caiaphas a man he could rely on to defend Roman interests
(Caiaphas served ten of his eighteen years as high priest under Pilate's
governorship).
But of course there are two sides to every story.
While the Jewish philosopher Philo Judaeus is not an unbiased source
for the Pilate administration,he is a contemporary source,and one that
attributes "violence","thefts","assaults",and "frequent executions"of
untried persons to Pilate("Embassy To Gaius" 301-2):(p.25-6).And
indeed under Tiberius many were executed for treason(Helmut Koester
"Introduction To The New Testament" vol.1,p.325-6,328),while the
pages of Josephus show Roman prefects faced with decisions
regarding guilt and punishment giving summary judgments that exhibit
a lack of detailed legalties(Raymond E.Brown,"Death Of The Messiah"
p.716),consistent with Philo's report about Pilate.
Surely the "mellow" Pilate of the advancing Gospel tradition is not
the historical Pontius Pilate.But if his summary execution of Samaritan
"messianists"is what got Pilate finally recalled,then presumably this
level of violence had been successfully avoided in the previous ten
years,and we are left to wonder if Judea remained "quiet"under
Tiberius because governors like Pilate often gave way to their
subjects' demands,but were quite willing to keep things "quiet"
through brutal repression.
 Man Of Blood: On The Last Days At Jerusalem
  • blodrayne
Ms Bond starts out on a WRONG premise that the Bible Gospels presents Pilate as a weak character, (how she comes to this conclusion is anybody's guess!) and procedures to build her presentation on this point. She states that her point is to show that Pilate was in fact a strong soldier with a personal agenda for killing Jesus. We never thought of Pilate as weak! To Pilate, this Jesus was just a passing event in the course of his day. Of course Pilate has a strong personality. He's a Roman soldier and Governor. Ms. Bond tends to over simplify the circumstances surrounding Roman rule over the Jerusalem garrison. History clearly shows that the citizens in Jerusalem were very difficult to control under the best of circumstances, and reminds so to this day. Ms Bond attempts to negate any responsibility of the Jewish priests and Jews in general for the death of Jesus, blaming Rome and Pilate. This agenda of Ms Bond spills over into her book and prevents a factual portrait. I personally prefer Ann Wroes, Pontus Pilate, or the writings of Josephus. I love history...but am weary of this interpretation.
  • Nuadora
At last, a well argued, clear, thoughful and incisive academic book on Pilate. Bond has a clear grasp of first-century culture, both Roman and Jewish, and handles texts highly effectively. As yet, this book is the serious historical piece on Pilate that has no competition over its academic credentials.
Dr. John C. McDowell, Meldrum Lecturer in Systematic Theology