almediah.fr
» » The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins (Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature)

Download The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins (Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature) eBook

by Joseph A. Fitzmyer S.J.

Download The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins (Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature) eBook
ISBN:
0802846505
Author:
Joseph A. Fitzmyer S.J.
Category:
Bible Study & Reference
Language:
English
Publisher:
Eerdmans; NEW STIFF WRAPS edition (March 3, 2000)
Pages:
308 pages
EPUB book:
1902 kb
FB2 book:
1984 kb
DJVU:
1679 kb
Other formats
lrf doc rtf mbr
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
375


This volume collects twelve studies on the Dead Sea Scrolls by Joseph Fitzmyer, including a new, ed essay of Qumran messianism.

This volume collects twelve studies on the Dead Sea Scrolls by Joseph Fitzmyer, including a new, ed essay of Qumran messianism.

The recovery of 800 documents in the eleven caves on the northwest shores of the Dead Sea is one.

Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications. 59 MB·42,947 Downloads·New! These proceedings contain the papers covering materials for high temperature power plant. The recovery of 800 documents in the eleven caves on the northwest shores of the Dead Sea is one. Quality Management for the Technology Sector. 33 MB·31,276 Downloads·New! these are, how they relate to one another and most critically how to take advantage of and implement the benefit.

The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins (Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature). Download (pdf, 1. 8 Mb) Donate Read.

Faculty Lecture: The Dead Sea Scrolls: A Biography - Продолжительность: 45:07 Yale Divinity School Recommended for you. 45:07. Война и мир (HD) фильм 2 - Наташа Ростова (исторический, ре. ергей Бондарчук, 1967 . - Продолжительность: 1:33:36 Киноконцерн "Мосфильм" Recommended for you.

Start by marking The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins as Want to Read .

Start by marking The Dead Sea Scrolls and Christian Origins as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This volume collects twelve studies on the Dead Sea Scrolls by Joseph Fitzmyer, including a new, ed essay on Qumran messianism

This volume collects twelve studies on the Dead Sea Scrolls by Joseph Fitzmyer, including a new, ed essay on Qumran messianism. Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Eerdmans, 2000Description: 290 . SBN: 0-8028-4650-5 Subject: Свитки (рукописи) Мертвого моря - Критицизм (анализ), интерпретация, Dead Sea scrolls - Criticism, interpretation, etc Рукописи Мертвого моря - Отношение к Новому Завету, Dead Sea scrolls - Relation to the New Testament.

Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series . Except for one, every book in the Hebrew Bi­. ble is represented by at least one fragment among the Dead Sea Scrolls; the. missing one is, of course, the book of Esther.

Studies in the Dead Sea Scrolls and Related Literature Society for New Testament Studies Monograph Series Studies on the Texts of the Desert of Judah Studia post-biblica Studia in Veteris Testamenti pseudepigraphica Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, ed. G. Kittel and G. Friedrich. Until recently one always had.

The Dead Sea Scrolls (also Qumran Caves Scrolls) are ancient Jewish religious manuscripts found in the Qumran Caves in the Judaean Desert, near Ein Feshkha on the northern shore of the Dead Sea. Scholarly consensus dates these scrolls from the last . . Scholarly consensus dates these scrolls from the last three centuries BCE and the first century CE. The texts have great historical, religious, and linguistic significance because they include the second-oldest known surviving manuscripts of works later included in the Hebrew Bible canon, along with.

Penguin books the complete dead sea scrolls in english. Geza Vermes was bom in Hungary in 1924. From 1957 to 1991 he taught in England at the universities of Newcastle upon Tyne (1 957-65) and Oxford (1965 - 91). He is now Professor Emeritus of Jewish Studies and Emeritus Fellow of Wolfson College, but continues to teach at the Oriental Institute in Oxford.

Gathers recent research that provides background to the Bible and Christianity.This volume by Joseph Fitzmyer, a pioneer in the field of Dead Sea Scrolls research, collects twelve of his recent studies on the Scrolls, including a new essay on Qumran messianism. Well known for his landmark work in Aramaic studies and on the Semitic background of the New Testament, Fitzmyer explores how the Scrolls have shed light on the interpretation of biblical themes and on the rise of early Christianity. All of the articles in this volume have been updated to take into account current discussions.
  • Геракл
Nobody pulls together in fine scholarly fashion what we know about the people who authored and collected the Dead Sea Scrolls and their relationship, such as it is, to nascent Christianity as does Fr. Fitzmyer, S.J.

I've been reading his stuff for years. Fitzmyer is scholarly, somewhat dry, and impeccably honest. His academic credentials are first-rate. He's one of the major contributors (in partnership with the legendary Scripture scholar Raymond E. Brown) to the New Jerusalem Biblical Commentary, as well as a number of critical commentaries in the Anchor Bible series (including the mighty tome on Paul's epistle to the Romans).

In this collections of essays published in 2000, some reworked in a salutary fashion to meet modern standards, Fr. Fitzmyer first sets up his methodology, explaining to the reader how he comes to his conclusions from the weath of data available. Some of the most interesting essays include "The Aramaic 'Son of God' Text from Qumran Cave 4" (in which he examines the title "Son of God" and its various flavors in this Semitic literature), the related article "The Background of 'Son of God' as a Title for Jesus" (in which Fitzmyer examines the Semitic - as opposed to Greek Septuagintal - context for "Son of God" in the New Testament in the light of the scrolls), and "Qumran Messianism" in which the often otherwise oversimplified messianic references are further explored and qualified. I also enjoyed the "Tobit" essays inasmuch as they demonstrate the value of what many Christians and Jews consider extra-canonical literature to the keepers of the scrolls.

In short, Fitzmyer shoots down both those who say the scrolls have nothing to do with Christianity, and those who say that figures like John the Baptist and Jesus himself show up in coded fashion in those same scrolls. Fr. Fitzmyer also paints a context in which the Jewishness of what we Christians call the New Testament plays a fundamental role.
  • Wooden Purple Romeo
I was expecting too much from the new chapter on Qumran and Messianism. Fitzmyer analyzes the various fragments pertaining to messiahs in a coldly academic atmosphere. He concludes, considering the changing singular and plural, past and future connotations the texts expose, that thought must have evolved within the community. But the relation with Christian origins does not come out.
What does Fitzmyer really think happened? The connection between the DSS and early Christianity will necessarily be Messiah-mediated. Does he have personal ideas or feelings while singing under the shower? Even the very stern Donald Redford finally indulged in a bit of subjectivism, a failure towards which he had always shown utmost distrust. And by doing so, presenting even excuses to the reader, he gave us the most eloquent and inspired refutation of Egyptian monotheism that admirers set in the hands of Akhenaton in El Amarna. What are Fitzmyer's deep convictions? Do the double messiah schemes represent community clans? The OT relates in many of its stories an opposition between the Jerusalem clergy and the Northern Highland clergy dedicated to the same Abraham inspired party. How did the Messianic community of Qumran express its internal dissents?
If an eminent scholar such as Fitzmyer only has question marks, we can seriously consider that the true relation between Scrolls and Gospels will finally come out, not from the academy, but from a layman as Ernest Renan predicted over a century ago.
  • Reemiel
The Dead Sea Scrolls are (for the most part) a collection of Hebrew and Aramaic writings from the centuries of the early occupation of Israel by the Romans. This coincides with a great time of change and diversity in Judaism, which included at that time at least three main sects (one might even go so far as to say, denominations): Saduccees, Pharisees, and Essenes. It also had within itself the seeds of two others: rabbinic Judaism and Christianity, both of which largely (and ironically) came out of the same strand: the Pharisees.
Joseph Fitzmyer (a Jesuit) has put together an interesting study in what is a major topic of interest to many scholars -- just what is the relation of these scrolls to Christianity? Because none of the scrolls as yet can be said to contain New Testament writings (those few fragments that might are very obscure, very ambiguous, and exceedingly small -- consisting of few words).
'This volume collects twelve studies on the Dead Sea Scrolls by Joseph Fitzmyer, including a new, never-before-published essay of Qumran messianism. A pioneer in the field of Scrolls research and well known for his work in Aramaic studies and in the Semitic background of the New Testament, Fitzmyer here explores particularly how the Scrolls have shed light on the Qumran community itself, on the interpretation of significant biblical themes, and on the rise of early Christianity.'
Fitzmyer has been working on the Scrolls since 1955; many of the essays in this book date originally to the early part of his career, but have been revised and updated to reflect the latest discoveries and interpretations in scroll research.
Prior to the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, there was very little information on the nature of Palestinian Judaism of this period -- the writings of Josephus and Philo provided some information, but the explosion in knowledge really occurred with the scrolls. There are limits to the usefulness of Josephus and of Philo for interpretation; the scrolls offer another leg for the stand.
'Because the writings of Philo are cast in a philosophical mold and indulge in Alexandrian allegorical interpretation of the Old Testament, they are not so useful for historical information about Judean Judaism of for the understanding of early Christianity and the interpretation of the New Testament.'
Fitzmyer discusses the political situation in the 1940s and 50s that resulted in the domination of scroll research by Christian scholars who, untrained in rabbinic Judaism, originally interpreted the scrolls in primarily or exclusively Christian terms. He credits more recent scholars, including Rabbi Lawrence Schiffman, for reclaiming the Jewish nature of the scrolls, and showing their primary importance to understanding nascent rabbinic Judaism, and contemporary research now progresses with this firmly in mind.
Fitzmyer explores the ideas of John the Baptist as a member of the Essenes, of Jesus' Jewish affiliation (was he an Essene too? or a Pharisee?)
'Although the Qumran Scrolls provide information that may help to explain the background of John the Baptist but practically nothing about Jesus and his background or ministry, interpreters have nevertheless discovered many striking details in the Scrolls that shed light on the New Testament writings.'
Because a major section of the scrolls consist of exegesis and commentary on prophecies, and the Qumran community was very interested in messianism, the scrolls show a mindset that was not uncommon in Israel at the time. They address four key points:
(1) the Palestinian background of important Pauline teachings;
(2) christological titles used in the New Testament ('Son of Man', etc.)
(3) background and similarities to certain Gospel passages, and
(4) new light on Melchidezek, the shadowy priest/king from Genesis who resurfaces in the Epistle to the Hebrews.
This book is an important work for anyone wishing to explore in more detail the importance of the scrolls for Christian origins, without falling into the trap of making the scrolls an exclusively-Christian collection of documents.