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by Richard J. Goodrich,David Diewert

Download A Summer Greek Reader eBook
ISBN:
0310236606
Author:
Richard J. Goodrich,David Diewert
Category:
Bible Study & Reference
Language:
English
Publisher:
Zondervan; Workbook edition (March 12, 2001)
Pages:
112 pages
EPUB book:
1638 kb
FB2 book:
1178 kb
DJVU:
1683 kb
Other formats
mobi lit rtf mbr
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
682


David Diewert (PhD, University of Toronto) is an adjunct professor of New Testament at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Lila's College Fund. David Diewert (PhD, University of Toronto) is an adjunct professor of New Testament at Regent College in Vancouver, British Columbia.

A Summer Greek Reader book.

A Summer Greek Reader encourages readers to memorize new words while applying the essentials of Greek to translating larger blocks of the New Testament text. Richard J. Goodrich (P. Passages are selected for their straightforward syntax. Unfamiliar words are cross-referenced or defined in footnotes eliminating the need for lexical work. University of St. Andrews) is lecturer in the department of history at Gonzaga University in Spokane, Washington.

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Richard J. Goodrich (Author), David Diewert (Author). A Summer Greek Reader is the first practical text specifically designed to help students of introductory Greek strengthen their grasp of the essentials over the summer. By spending just twenty minutes a day, students not only maintain when they’ve learned in their first-year class, but will also build their working vocabulary and gain practice with extended Greek New Testament passages.

A Summer Greek Reader: A Workbook for Maintaining Your Biblical Greek. Coauthored with David Diewert. The Teachings of the Desert Fathers: Verba seniorum 3, 6 and 7. Under contract with Paulist Press, Ancient Christian Writers Series. Manuscript due August 2018.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Richard J Goodrich books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. A Summer Greek Reader. Contextualizing Cassian.

A SUMMER GREEK READER by Richard Goodrich and David Diewert - 2001 . SWEET'S ANGLO-SAXON READER in Prose and Verse by Dorothy Whitelock, rev.

A SUMMER GREEK READER by Richard Goodrich and David Diewert - 2001 -. S$ 2. 4. -1970-.

A Summer Greek Reader is the first practical text specifically designed to help students of introductory Greek Strengthen their grasp of the essentials over the summer. By spending just twenty minutes a day, students not only maintain when they’ve learned in their first-year class, but will also build their working vocabulary and gain practice with extended Greek New Testament passages.This volume is perfect for students who want to begin reading complete passages of the Greek New Testament while avoiding the complexities encountered in intermediate and advanced studies. A Summer Greek Reader encourages readers to memorize new words while applying the essentials of Greek to translating larger blocks of the New Testament text.• Passages are selected for their straightforward syntax.• Unfamiliar words are cross-referenced or defined in footnotes eliminating the need for lexical work.• English translations are provided for each passage so students can check their work.Self-contained and easy to use, A Summer Greek Reader is a rewarding means of strengthening the knowledge first-year Greek students have worked so hard to acquire. By eliminating then need to rebuild old foundations and by minimizing the mad dash for a bigger vocabulary during the first weeks of second-year Greek, this book will quickly prove its worth to students and educators alike.
  • Cells
I am a graduate student studying the Biblical languages. I just finished my first year of Biblical Greek using William D. Mounce's "Basics of Biblical Greek." Here's what to expect with this Summer Greek Reader:

It is designed to bridge the gap between Beginning Greek and Intermediate Greek by getting you into the Greek New Testament for about 10-15 minutes each day. Let's face it, with a dead language, one could forget a lot of what was learned (or crammed) in Beginning Greek! There are 12 weeks that have 6 passages each (about a paragraph in length). It is designed to do one passage per day. If there is a word that you haven't learned yet, there is a footnote that gives the definition. Each week also has vocabulary words with helpful memorization tricks. If you keep up with the vocabulary, you should know every word in the New Testament that occurs 20 times or more.

I've just finished my first week with the book and can already see how this resource is going to really help me maintain what I learned in my first year of Greek. By honing these skills and building vocabulary all summer, this resource will set the Greek learner up for success in intermediate Greek.

Also, it's a great price for such a helpful resource.
  • Samugor
I used this workbook in between first and second year Greek in order to stay sharp on my skills. The workbook offers some 24 passages to translate followed by verb parsings. The passages range from easy (1 John) to much more difficult (Gospel passages). The workbook is relatively straight forward and a great exercise for those looking to stay sharp on their translation and parsing skills.
  • Berkohi
There are many Greek readers out there, but in my opinion in terms of level of difficulty and format, this is one of the more suitable ones for a student who has just completed an introductory course such as William Mounce's "Baics of Biblical Greek".

This reader presents daily passages for reading, parsing and translating. The readings are spread over 12 chapters, each chapter a block of text drawn from Matthew, Mark, John or 1 John consisting of 30 to 35 verses. One feature of this reader that sets it apart from others is that each chapter is divided into short, manageable daily passages of about 5 to 6 verses, so it is easy to incorporate the translation exercises into one's daily routine and develop the habit of reading some Greek everyday. (Other readers I have seen simply have large chapters that can appear rather overwhelming to the beginning student.) Ample space is provided on each page for the student to write down his translation. The texts chosen have relatively straightforward syntax, and new words are introduced in the footnotes. This, coupled with the literal translations of the passages provided at the end of the book, make this reader easy for the student to work through on his own. Unlike some other readers, this reader does not have the irritating feature of constantly referring the student to reference works which the student may not have access to.

Each chapter ends with a vocabulary list to learn in preparation for an intermediate course. In addition to definitions, many of the words also come with mnemonic devices, which is a nice touch.

Note that the purpose of this book is not to teach new grammar, but simply to maintain whatever has been learnt in an introductory course, so there are no detailed grammatical explanations, no new grammatical items to learn, no charts of verb paradigms, nor are there any exegetical discussions. It assumes at least one year of study of Greek, so it is not exactly for "beginners". The purpose of this book is simply to get the student to start reading in Greek entire texts for himself, and it does the job well.
  • Usishele
Great way to keep one's Greek up, all throughout the year.
  • BORZOTA
This has been a great resource during the summer between semesters!
  • mIni-Like
This workbook greatly helps the student who has just completed the first year of Greek using Mounce’s Basics of Biblical Greek, because Mounce does a great disservice to students by stopping his vocab at the 50x frequency. That means that students like me will be faced with an inadequate vocabulary for working through their third semester of Greek.

Instead of suffering in the third semester, you can use this workbook over the summer to learn “vocabulary [which Mounce leaves out of BBG] in this period between introductory and intermediate Greek, rather than try[ing] to cram it in during the first weeks of the new school year” (8). The toughest thing for the student to do over the summer, however, is to force him/herself to memorize this vocab without a professor giving quizzes. But that’s another story
  • Bedy
This is a pretty good workbook for its stated purpose. I worked through Mounce's Basics of Biblical Greek on my own, and when I was done I found this book to be at a very good level for practicing and maintaining what I had learned.

Probably the chief drawback to this workbook is that it encourages the practice of thinking of the Greek text in terms of Englishing the text rather than actually trying to understand the Greek directly. As I worked through it, after producing my "translation" I tried to go back and re-read the Greek to see how much I could understand without thinking it in English.

There were a few (but just a few) cases where unfamiliar vocabulary wasn't defined as described in the preface. There were more than a few cases where verbs were presented for parsing in completely unfamiliar forms, so that rather than practicing parsing one is actually learning a new principle part. That's useful, obviously, but a little frustrating. I would have rather had a footnote hinting at the lexical form.

My biggest complaint about this book is that the binding on my copy was terrible. The pages kept falling out. By the time I finished, the last page was the only page still attached to the cover.