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Download The Five Books of Moses: A Translation with Commentary eBook

by Robert Alter

Download The Five Books of Moses: A Translation with Commentary eBook
ISBN:
0393333930
Author:
Robert Alter
Category:
Bible Study & Reference
Language:
English
Publisher:
W. W. Norton & Company; 59869th edition (October 17, 2008)
Pages:
1120 pages
EPUB book:
1301 kb
FB2 book:
1238 kb
DJVU:
1189 kb
Other formats
lrf doc rtf lit
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
489


Robert Alter's translation of the Hebrew Bible, the magnificent capstone to a lifetime of distinguished scholarly work, has won the PEN Center Literary Award for Translation.

Robert Alter's translation of the Hebrew Bible, the magnificent capstone to a lifetime of distinguished scholarly work, has won the PEN Center Literary Award for Translation. His immense achievements in scholarship ranging from the eighteenth-century European novel to contemporary Hebrew and American literature earned Alter the Robert Kirsch Award for Lifetime Achievement from the Los Angeles Times

Robert Alter's translation of the Five Books of Moses is stunning. There is something wonderful about reading them translated from scratch by a single person so that it embodies a fresh, singular.

Robert Alter's translation of the Five Books of Moses is stunning. Пользовательский отзыв - jamescostello - LibraryThing. Genesis is great and Alter makes it greater with his scholarly and poetic translation. The footnotes take up more page space than the text, and every note is outstanding. This should be in every library alongside Homer and Ovid.

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It was written over the course of two decades

It was written over the course of two decades. Alter's translation is considered unique in its being a one-man translation of the entire Hebrew Bible.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Winner of the PEN Center USA Literary Award for Through a distinguished career of critical scholarship and translation, Robert Alter has equipped us to read the Hebrew Bible as a powerful, cohesive work of literature.

This book finally made it possible for me to read the Bible. The translation is good but the notes are invaluable. The Bible, especially the oldest parts that are included in this book, is too old and comes from a culture too far from us to be understood without notes.

by Alter & Robert. This book provides that guidance. Written by a quality consultant with over 20 years experience. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications.

Alter's majestic translation recovers the mesmerizing effect of these ancient stories-the profound and haunting enigmas, the ambiguities of motive and image, and the distinctive cadences and lovely precision of the Hebrew text.

Alter, who has written extensively on the literary aspects of the Hebrew Bible, seeks here to honor the meaning and . Highly recommended,'--Library Journal. 1120 pages, softcover.

Alter, who has written extensively on the literary aspects of the Hebrew Bible, seeks here to honor the meaning and literary strategies of the ancient text. The writing is fluid and graceful.

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support and .

Jewish Book Council, founded in 1944, is the longest-running organization devoted exclusively to the support and celebration of Jewish literature.

"A modern classic....Thrilling and constantly illuminating."―Michael Dirda, Washington Post Book World

Through a distinguished career of critical scholarship and translation, Robert Alter has equipped us to read the Hebrew Bible as a powerful, cohesive work of literature. In this landmark work, Alter's masterly translation and probing commentary combine to give contemporary readers the definitive edition of The Five Books. Winner of the PEN Center USA Literary Award for Translation and the Koret Jewish Book Award for Translation, a Newsweek Top 15 Book, Los Angeles Times Favorite Book, and San Francisco Chronicle Best Book.
  • Samowar
Great translation and commentary, perhaps the best. For Genesis and Exodus this year, I'm reading four commentaries, and most of the time I find Alter the most illuminating. But, there moments of disappointment. One of the most profound moments in Torah is when the people say, in Exodus (24:7), "We will do and we will hear (listen/understand)." That is the literal translation. Profound is the coupling with Genesis, where the great sin was to separate knowledge from life, the tree of knowledge from the tree of life. For Jews, choosing life -- to do, to live, praxis -- is fundamental. Understanding comes through doing, applying knowledge in deeds. So these two passages are inextricably intertwined. Alter missed a golden opportunity to right a centuries old wrong in translation, most following Rashi in a very poor redaction, modifying the meaning to and translating as "obey." Alter chose a middle ground, but with no notes or commentary, translating, "We shall do and we will heed." Better perhaps, but still missing the profound sense of it. The difficulty arises because there is no word in Biblical Hebrew for "obey," which is the common, and I think pedestrian, choice in translation. (See Rabbi Jonathan Sacks' Future Tense, p. 191.) In fact, when Hebrew was revived as a modern language, a new word had to be coined to literally mean "obey." Another disappointment is in Genesis where Alter translates, "Jacob's life was linked to Joseph's," or something very close to that. (I don't have the Alter handy as I write.) The Hebrew literally reads, "Jacob's soul was intertwined/co-mingled with Joseph's." To me, that is a huge difference. It is similar to some Christian translations of Psalms 69.1 which read, "The water is up to my neck," when literally it should read, "The waters have come unto my soul." Waters, the plural, in Genesis and elsewhere represent chaos and darkness. I guess the point here is that not one translation ever totally serves, nor one commentary. The serious student will have a second to balance things out. Final point, for the Jew the Alter does not replace a Chumash because there are no breaks for the Parashot, no Hebrew, and no Haftorahs. But at a 1000 pages, there's a limit. Still probably the best overall translation and commentary, Alter provides plenty of references to alternate translations, commentaries and sources.
  • Whatever
This one-man translation stands out for its very literal rendering of the Hebrew original, designed explicitly to capture the feel of the original Hebrew. This being the goal, the English rendering is less readable than most translations, which the translator readily admits. This translation is much more suited, in my opinion, to study of the biblical text than to casual reading of the text, because it reads more slowly and requires more concentration than a typical English translation, and I would say the English is less beautiful than standard translations. But beauty of English expression wasn't the main point. Having said all this, it is neat for a non-Hebrew reader to be given a better sense of how the text might read if one knew Hebrew.

The text is in large type and in a single column. Verse numbers are given in the outer margins rather than within the text itself, but the chapter divisions are as distinct as chapter divisions in a novel. Translation notes and commentary appear directly below the text at the bottom of the page, but there are no distracting footnotes used within the biblical text itself. The notes at the bottom take up at least as much of the page, on average, as does the biblical text. It's easy to explore textual issues at the bottom of the page or simply to read the scriptural text, as one desires.

It's a large and heavy volume: over 1,000 pages in my paperback edition, 9 inches by 6 inches, with about 50 pages of introductory material to the volume, plus introductions to each biblical book that average about 8 pages each. The paper quality and thickness are very good; the paper is a comfortable off-white color.

I'm giving a lot of basic information because the Amazon description wasn't that helpful.

I'm finding this translation, and the introductions and notes, very helpful for study of the text. I wouldn't use this translation for a Scripture reading in church but for personal--or group--study it is outstanding and helpful.

Postscript: I have noted several reviewers here who had serious problems with the binding of this book coming unraveled. I don't doubt that they have had these problems, but I have had no problems whatever with my paperback version.
  • Fesho
I can't remember now how I came upon Robert Alter's work, but I'm certainly glad I did. His style is very readable, occasionally reminiscent of the King James Version (particularly in poetic passages). He also elucidated the meaning of the text through copious notes, which I found very interesting and valuable. They make connections between different segments, note recurring themes and motifs, as well as provide the rationale for translating words/phrases a particular way. Equally valuable are his introductions to each book of the Pentateuch, which lay the groundwork for what you're about to read. You have the legendary stories in Genesis, the Exodus and Wilderness narratives, the sweeping rhetoric of Deuteronomy, and of course the many laws and cultic regulations/procedures (which were still difficult to get through). However, the most important takeaway I got was seeing, despite the complicated process of redaction and editing of oral tradition that brought us the text, how unified in theme and purpose it was as a literary work and unit. This translation might be a little difficult for casual reading, but would make an excellent supplement to Bible study. I'm definitely looking forward to delving into Robert Alter's other translations now after this.