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Download Mennonites in the Global Village eBook

by Leo Driedger

Download Mennonites in the Global Village eBook
ISBN:
0802080448
Author:
Leo Driedger
Category:
Christian Denominations & Sects
Language:
English
Publisher:
University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; Re-Issue edition (February 11, 2000)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1740 kb
FB2 book:
1442 kb
DJVU:
1951 kb
Other formats
lrf lit mbr azw
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
138


Start by marking Mennonites in the Global Village as Want to Read .

Start by marking Mennonites in the Global Village as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Driedger contends that Mennonites are in a unique position in meeting the electronic challenge, having entered modern society relatively recently.

Mennonites in the Global. has been added to your Cart. Leo Driedger is a professor of Sociology at the University of Manitoba. Paperback: 336 pages.

Before the 1940s, ninety per cent of Mennonites in North America lived on farms. Fifty years later, less than ten per cent of Mennonites continue to farm and more than a quarter of the population - the largest demographic block - are professionals. Mennonite teenagers are forced to contend with a broader definition of community, as parochial education systems are restructured to compete in a new marketplace.

Utopian Studies 11 (2):255-257 (2000). Similar books and articles. Beyond the Global Village. Environmental Challenges Inspiring Global Citizenship. R. C. Hillerbrand & R. Karlsson (ed.

Leo Driedger is well known for his contributions to Canadian sociology, to the study of ethnicity, and to the sociology of Mennonite and other Anabaptist religious groups

Leo Driedger is well known for his contributions to Canadian sociology, to the study of ethnicity, and to the sociology of Mennonite and other Anabaptist religious groups.

In the summer of 1998, two hundred Mennonites met in Bluffton, Ohio, to discuss ‘Anabaptists and Postmodernity.

Published by: University of Toronto Press. Driedger contends that Mennonites are in a unique position in the global electronic age, having entered modern society relatively recently. eISBN: 978-1-4426-7723-4. In the summer of 1998, two hundred Mennonites met in Bluffton, Ohio, to discuss ‘Anabaptists and Postmodernity. We also discussed the electronic information revolution, and how computers, e-mail, and the Internet were changing communication, human interaction, and communities.

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Mennonites in the Global Village Close. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Mennonites in the Global Village from your list? Mennonites in the Global Village. Published February 11, 2000 by University of Toronto Press.

90; Leo Driedger, Mennonites in the Global Village (Toronto: Univ. 6 Lucille Marr, The.

Driedger contends that Mennonites are in a unique position in the global electronic age, having entered modern society relatively recently.

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Mennonites in the Global Village. University of Toronto Press.

Before the 1940s, ninety per cent of Mennonites in North America lived on farms. Fifty years later, less than ten per cent of Mennonites continue to farm and more than a quarter of the population - the largest demographic block - are professionals. Mennonite teenagers are forced to contend with a broader definition of community, as parochial education systems are restructured to compete in a new marketplace. Women are adopting leadership roles alongside men. Many Mennonites have embraced modernity.

Leo Driedger explores the impact of professionalism and individualism on Mennonite communities, cultures, families, and religion, particularly in light of the scholarly work of futurists Alvin and Heidi Tofler, which has described the shift from a homogeneous industrial society to a diversified electronic society. Driedger contends that Mennonites are in a unique position in meeting the electronic challenge, having entered modern society relatively recently. He traces trends in Mennonite life by reviewing such issues as the shift from farming to professionalism, the role of mass media, the role of active leadership, and increased social interaction. Menonites face many of the other challenges that religious minorities in North America encounter in the move to modernity, and this study provides in-depth insights into this transition.