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Download The Grand Inquisitor (Crossroad Book) eBook

by Carla Millar,John Zmirak

Download The Grand Inquisitor (Crossroad Book) eBook
ISBN:
0824524357
Author:
Carla Millar,John Zmirak
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
The Crossroad Publishing Company (May 1, 2008)
Pages:
76 pages
EPUB book:
1540 kb
FB2 book:
1946 kb
DJVU:
1870 kb
Other formats
txt mbr lrf azw
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
581


The Grand Inquisitor is a long theological discussion. The art is excellent, better than any other comic book

The Grand Inquisitor is a long theological discussion. This book will give every reader much to think about, one can not simply finish this book and forget about it. The art is excellent, better than any other comic book.

The storyline will not be given away here, but I recommend this book for young adult readers and not children, as the story and illustrations provide disturbing images.

This updating of Dostoevsky’s fable will challenge believers of every hue, and fascinate students of religion, philosophy and literature. The storyline will not be given away here, but I recommend this book for young adult readers and not children, as the story and illustrations provide disturbing images. If one is into graphic novels, this is one of the best. So haunting because it's the truth? Published by Thriftbooks. com User, 10 years ago. Sometimes fiction can capture a truth better than simply reciting the facts. The "Grand Inquisitor" is an example.

The Grand Inquisitor book. Beyond that, the art is a struggle as well

The Grand Inquisitor book. Author John Zmirak takes a unique tack, pressing all the text found in The Grand Inquisitor into the constraints of poetic verse. Beyond that, the art is a struggle as well. It's hard to tell whether Carla Millar is an honestly talented illustrator who's consciously wielding a stylistic tic or maybe she's actually got the chops of a talented ninth grader who's never had any official instruction as to anatomy or the formation of drawn persons.

The Grand Inquisitor (Paperback). John Zmirak (author), Carla Millar (author). Publisher: Crossroad Publishing Co,. Please provide me with your latest book news, views and details of Waterstones’ special offers. Added to basket.

The Grand Inquisitor. A graphic novel is a comic book on steroids: It’s bigger, fiercer, and capable of heavy lifting

The Grand Inquisitor. A graphic novel is a comic book on steroids: It’s bigger, fiercer, and capable of heavy lifting. What could be a heavier topic than a conspiracy to destroy Christ’s Church from within? That’s the theme of John Zmirak’s latest, The Grand Inquisitor. My guess is I’m not the target audience for this book

The Crossroad Publishing Company. When I picked up John Zmirak and Carla Millar's The Grand Inquisitor, I expected something similar. That's not what I got. Instead, I got a traditionalist Catholic retelling of Dostoyevsky's tale from The Brothers Karamazov. And what a retelling. Zmirak and Millar's retelling casts an African priest from Darfur as the Christ-like figure who finds himself in Rome in the midst of a contentious papal election. The Inquisitor is a liberal cardinal who argues that the liberalization of the Church has been done so that people cannot see the difference between sin and salvation.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of John Zmirak books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Showing 1 to 24 of 24 results. Most popular Price, low to high Price, high to low Publication date, old to new Publication date, new to old. The Bad Catholic's Guide to the Seven Deadly Sins.

The Grand Inquisitor" is a poem (a story within a story) inside Fyodor Dostoevsky's novel The Brothers Karamazov (1879–1880). It is recited by Ivan Karamazov, who questions the possibility of a personal and benevolent God, to his brother Alexei (Alyosha), a novice monk. The Grand Inquisitor" is an important part of the novel and one of the best-known passages in modern literature because of its ideas about human nature and freedom, and its fundamental ambiguity.

This updating of Dostoevsky’s fable will challenge believers of every hue, and fascinate students of religion, philosophy and literature. The first graphic novel written in Miltonic blank verse, is exquisitely illustrated and promises to change the genre forever.
  • Deorro
This is not a typical comic book, not an action adventure fantasy type story. The Grand Inquisitor is a long theological discussion. This book will give every reader much to think about, one can not simply finish this book and forget about it. The art is excellent, better than any other comic book. Carla Millar has too much talent to waste her time on comic books, except this one.
  • Malogamand
This book presents an alarming but interesting interpretation of the "liberal" vs. the "traditional" views of the Catholic Church from the perspective of Dostoevsky's section in The Brothers Karamazov. The storyline will not be given away here, but I recommend this book for young adult readers and not children, as the story and illustrations provide disturbing images. If one is into graphic novels, this is one of the best.
  • Qiahmagha
John Zmirak is a genius! I enjoy all of his works. I Loved Mahoney golfing with Law!
  • CrazyDemon
For those that are not Catholic, I would suggest you read this book as good fiction. Enjoy the excellent artwork. When the DaVinci Code was popular, I was told it's just good fiction, not dogmatic, read it as such. Well, the same should apply here. The Grand Inquisitor thankfully, has re-introduced me to how good graphic novels can be.

Catholics and non-Catholics will enjoy the excellent storyline and art. Get the book.
  • Swordsong
Oh gosh this book has some whack theology. And the art was really hit or miss. As a Catholic or non-Catholic I'd say definitely give this a pass.... and if you're Eastern Orthodox you might actually find it offensive...
  • Vishura
This book was marketed as the continuation of the dialogue between Christ and the Grand Inquisitor in "The Brothers Karamozov."

It didn't seem to do it for me. It was a cute story - I suppose - with not so cute drawings, (I have to give the artist credit, those drawings must have taken hours of work), but it was far from an intellectually satisfying continuation of this philosophically significant literary landmark.
  • Jode
I am interested in religion and was intrigued by this book when I purchased it used. The art is very detailed, the artist is very good at portraits of aged men. I was a bit put off by the dense blocks of dialogue in tiny type but hoped it would prove to be enlightening of the way Catholics see the world. The concept of the first black Pope was fascinating and I hoped to learn more about the conflict of the many ways of believing in today's Catholic religion--I was raised Catholic but moved on later in my life and found fulfillment elsewhere.

I have a lot of experience reading graphic novels, but soon found myself wading through almost incomprehensible dialogue, but I suppose if I was a practicing Catholic who believes in a literal Hell, and has read a lot of Catholic philosophy, I would love it and it would make more sense. The conversations between the characters does not read at all like normal human dialogue. The stiff, stilted writing literally screamed "this is Important!" It does show the many faces of the Catholic Church. All I really got out of it is that there are still many Catholics who believe theirs is the one True Path, birth control is the work of Satan, and anyone who fails to recognize this is simply deluded or lazy or willfully ignorant but a Merciful Christ will save them (present company included, I guess) from Hell nonetheless. It seems to have been written by someone who has some good ideas, has really thought about his subject matter, and sincerely believes in it, but really does not know how to write a graphic novel, or believable dialogue. I would have enjoyed it more and perhaps gotten more out of it if the writing was better. But perhaps one feels a need to use stiff, stilted language when writing about what you believe to be the One Truth. Maybe the author felt writing it more like everyday dialogue would somehow vulgarize it.

I would recommend this for anyone who is interested in religion and wants to see how traditional Catholics view the world and eternity and matters of spirit. Practicing Catholics who are struggling with issues of their faith should enjoy it particularly. I am sure it will give them much to think about. The art is very detailed, has a nice Michelangelo and William Blake feel to it, though the figures sometimes seem as stilted as the words. There are some good, surreal scenes of the damned being tormented in Hell.
Sometimes fiction can capture a truth better than simply reciting the facts. The "Grand Inquisitor" is an example.

Ever since the moment of its inception, the Catholic church has faced seemingly insurmountable challenges.

In the last, unlamented century, secularism and atheism have attacked the church relentlessly. Millions fell away in Europe. Communists sent priests and nuns to the gulag, murdered them, or sent them to insane asylums. The 20th century had more martyrs than any century before. Those who stood firm in the church against battalions of those who chanted: change, change, change, were derided.

But at the core of the church is not men with their failings. It is the Holy Spirit, guiding it always to the truth. And that is the truth told in this graphic novel.

It's so unique, such a strange and intelligent story, that I think it is one of the most remarkable books I have ever read. The pictures are wonderful. The language spare but gripping.

For every traditional Catholic, this a book to savor, and to send on to your friends and children.