almediah.fr
» » Four Views on Hell

Download Four Views on Hell eBook

by William V. Crockett

Download Four Views on Hell eBook
ISBN:
0310533112
Author:
William V. Crockett
Category:
Theology
Language:
English
Publisher:
Zondervan (November 1, 1992)
Pages:
190 pages
EPUB book:
1851 kb
FB2 book:
1339 kb
DJVU:
1137 kb
Other formats
lrf txt mbr azw
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
741


Four Views on Hell Summarized The first view examined is the Literal View represented by John Walvoord.

Four Views on Hell Summarized The first view examined is the Literal View represented by John Walvoord. His orthodox approach to the doctrine first affirms the inerrancy of Scripture and states that the problem is one of understanding what Scripture is actually teaching. He even contends that most evangelicals today interpret the fires of hell metaphorically or at least allow for the possibility.

by. Crockett, William V. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on May 31, 2012. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

This book places four views of hell side by side and allows the reader to decide on the true nature of God's judgment. ISBN13:9780310533115. Release Date:September 1992.

Four Views on Hell book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Four Views on Hell has been added to your Cart. 2. William Crockett argues an eternal but more metaphorical view of Hell. While somewhat vague, Crockett defends his position well with historical context and makes a plausible arguement

Four Views on Hell has been added to your Cart. While somewhat vague, Crockett defends his position well with historical context and makes a plausible arguement. 3. The Catholic Zachary Hayes discusses the concept of Purgatory.

Most contemporary Christians acknowledge the doctrine of hell, but they'd rather not think about how God punishes the wicked

Most contemporary Christians acknowledge the doctrine of hell, but they'd rather not think about how God punishes the wicked. The authors of Four Views on Hell meet this subject head-on with different views on what the Scriptures say. Is hell to be understood literally as a place of eternal smoke and flames? Or are such images simply metaphors for a real but different form of punishment? Is there such a thing as 'conditional immortality,' in which God annihilates the souls of the wicked rather than punishing them endlessly? Is there a Purgatory, and if so, how.

William Crockett is professor of New Testament at Alliance Theological Seminary.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. William Crockett is professor of New Testament at Alliance Theological Seminary.

This book, Four Views on Hell continues the series tradition by providing the views of four distinguished authors; each . Walvoord, John . William V. Crockett, Zachary J. Hayes, and Clark H. Pinnock.

This book, Four Views on Hell continues the series tradition by providing the views of four distinguished authors; each qualified to represent his position. Represented in the book are the literal, metaphorical, purgatorial, and conditional views of Hell. Each author attempts to persuade the reader as to the strength of their view while also respectfully pointing out the flaws of the other authors view on the subject. ii Ibid, 15. teaching of Jesus himself.

Four Views on Hell highlights why the church still needs to wrestle with the doctrine of hell. In the familiar counterpoints format, four leading scholars introduce us to the current views on eternal judgment, with particular attention being given to the new voices that have entered the debate.

What is the nature of hell? Will the wicked be destroyed by physical flames, or was God using a metaphor in the New Testament? This book places four views of hell side by side and allows the reader to decide on the true nature of God's judgment. Features debates and rebuttals by editor Crockett, Zachary Hayes, John Walvoord, and Clark Pinnock.
  • Zahisan
The topic of Hell is one of the more contentious in modern Christian philosiphy and rather highly debated in theology depending on the denomination. 4 Views on Hell provides an informative and interesting overview of several views on the matter. The book is broken down as follows:

1. The late John F. Walvoord defends a traditional literal and eternal view of hell. While I disagree with Walvoord's famous dispensationalist rapture position, his defense of Hell musters considerable scriptual support.

2. William Crockett argues an eternal but more metaphorical view of Hell. While somewhat vague, Crockett defends his position well with historical context and makes a plausible arguement.

3. The Catholic Zachary Hayes discusses the concept of Purgatory. As I believe other reviews have noted, the section was a little out of place. That said it was still interesting.

4. Clark Pinnock makes a forceful and interesting case for conditionalism, or in other words annilihationism. He combines some historical, philisophical, and scriptual support for the view. The scriptual view is perhaps surprisingly well put though there still seems some problems getting around Revelation if one takes some of the verses literally. Likewise, the philisophical view would be strong for some, though one of Walvoord's objections is also potentially a strong arguement against human philisophical objection depending on one's viewpoint.

Each of the other contributors writes a short response following a main section in the book.

Two views not advanced by any of the contributors were Universalism and reincarnation from a christian perspective. While I don't personally agree with either, they could have been some interesting sections. On the whole, my mind is open on the matter of Hell. I find Pinnock's view personally interesting but Walvoord and Crockett both have strong reasoning to back their approaches.

Overall an interesting book. The contributors generally stay polite while being very dedicated to their views.
  • Quendant
I picked up this volume on one of my international trips from South Africa. I got this book on a trip to Euless, Texas, (Dallas area) in 2007, while there for an international conference related to my cultural research work.

This book is a volume in the series Counterpoints: Exploring Theology. Crockett is the Series Editor. The historical background provided by each of these authors in their articles is very helpful to provide a perspective on the variety of views of afterlife, judgement and punishment in the history of the Christian tradition.

Catholic and Protestant
This book is notable in that it includes one noted Roman Catholic scholar, Zachary Hayes, among the expected Protestant scholars. I found Hayes' essay very helpful in understanding the Catholic concept of Purgatory. His historical analysis and theological construction of the doctrine from that historical base were helpful to understand how this doctrine developed.

Hayes is very well-read in Protestant theology and terminology and adds a refreshing dimension to this dialogue. Each author gives a response to each of the other authors' essay.

Dialogue
This dialogue format has been used in other recent topic series by publishers and is a very effective way for the reader to see the differences and similarities of views and easily understand some of the major options seen by various thinkers or schools of thought.

In this set of ideas, I found the most creative and thoughtful to be Pinnock and Hayes. Walvoord is more cautious and stays close to his Reformed roots, while Pinnock enjoys the adventure of exploration. I was not familiar with Crockett before reading this, but was impressed with his thinking. I will leave the details for you to discover, so won't detail the specifics of their views here.

Pinnock is a thoughtful writer, who has an incisive awareness of the contents of scripture. I have read other works by Pinnock, and find his style and openness to discovery refreshing and encouraging. Pinnock is more of a theologian, cautious of the way we use reason and aware of the role of assumptions.

Scripture
There are some differences between the authors on how they treat scripture or how they understand it to be authoritative. The discussion takes into account the historical perspectives, which will help the less initiated reader see the cultural aspects of this question.

This is not your stock Sunday School rehash of medieval syncretism of Celtic or Germanic cultural myths that is so commonly passed off as Christian and even biblical in popular Christianity. In considering possibilities about punishment or accountability for moral decisions, these thinkers likewise do not simply toss around simplistic rule-breaking concepts of sin and punishment.

I was glad to see how seriously they took the questions of moral responsibility and justice or fairness in considering the reasonableness of possibilities. You will find this stimulating.
  • Ahieones
I was surprised to find a chapter devoted to Purgatory within this book, but it's a pleasant surprise. Fr Hayes's chapter is one of the most thoughtful popular presentations on Purgatory one will come across, reflecting the best in contemporary Catholic scholarship. It almost makes the book worth the price of admission. Particularly helpful, I think, is the way Hayes distinguishes between a Catholic understanding of salvation as process and the Reformation understanding of salvation as a one-time justifying event. It is this difference, and not biblical exegesis alone, that explains the Reformation rejection of Purgatory. Both Crockett and Pinnock seem to understand this. Pinnock also recognizes that the Catholic doctrine of Pinnock may in fact be compatible with his Arminianism.

Walvoord's chapter is wooden and lacking in nuance. Pinnock's defense of annihilationism is vigorously argued, but I think he takes a couple of cheap shots at predestination. It is not correct to assert that say, as Pinnock does, that according to predestinarianism, God "compels" people to believe. That may score a rhetorical point or two, but it's unfair to Augustine, Aquinas, and Calvin.

Crockett spends most of his time arguing for the legitimacy of non-literal reading of Scripture and passes-over the harder moral and theological questions. Where is C. S. Lewis when you need him? For a more serious presentation of the metaphorical position, I would recommend Jerry Walls's book *Hell: The Logic of Damnation*. But Walls is a Wesleyan and thus more sympathetic to Catholic understandings of justification and purgatory.