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Download The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America's Food Business eBook

by Christopher Leonard

Download The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America's Food Business eBook
ISBN:
145164583X
Author:
Christopher Leonard
Category:
Biography & History
Language:
English
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster; Reprint edition (February 24, 2015)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1627 kb
FB2 book:
1484 kb
DJVU:
1660 kb
Other formats
lrf txt lit azw
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
572


This book is for my father, George Edward Leonard, the finest man whom I have ever known. There is a very good chance any of the meat purchased in these places was made by Tyson

This book is for my father, George Edward Leonard, the finest man whom I have ever known. As they used to say back in the day, Dad: Come now, let us argue it out. CONTENTS. There is a very good chance any of the meat purchased in these places was made by Tyson. Even if Tyson did not produce a given piece of meat, the consumer is really only picking between different versions of the same commoditized beef, chicken, and pork that is produced through a system Tyson pioneered. Tyson’s few competitors have resorted to imitating the company’s business model just to survive.

Leonard’s book argues that a handful of companies, led by Tyson, control our meat industry in ways that raise concerns .

Leonard’s book argues that a handful of companies, led by Tyson, control our meat industry in ways that raise concerns about the impact on animals and humans alike, while tearing at the fabric of rural America. Nicholas Kristof, The New York Times). As a Midwestern, middle class wife and mother of a meat-eating family of five, I appreciated the window into a world that would not have been seen without this in-depth examination. Christopher Leonard spent a decade exploring every aspect of the modern meat production process.

Even after he got rich, Don Tyson preferred to dine at Neal’s Café, the Springdale greasy spoon where he used to have lunch with his father. Don would show up at the airport for a business trip with. his breakfast in a paper bag from McDonald’s. He joined the growing herd of Americans who grabbed their lunch from a drive-through window. And Don took note of what he saw there. He noticed how restaurant patrons were in a hurry. When they bought lunch, they wanted something they could eat in a car, something they could get fast, and something they could get cheap.

Электронная книга "The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America's Food Business", Christopher Leonard

Электронная книга "The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America's Food Business", Christopher Leonard. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Meat Racket: The Secret Takeover of America's Food Business" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Meat Racket book. He shows how they built a system that puts farmers on the edge of bankruptcy, charges high prices to consumers, and returns the industry to the shape it had in the 1900s before the meat monopolists were broken up.

This event took place on April 23, 2014 at the Central Library.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. How much do you know about the meat on your dinner plate? Journalist Christopher Leonard spent more than a decade covering the country’s biggest meat companies, including four years as the national agribusiness reporter for the Associated Press.

An investigative journalist takes you inside the corporate meat industry-a shocking, in-depth report every American .

An investigative journalist takes you inside the corporate meat industry-a shocking, in-depth report every American should read. How much do you know abou.

Business Business & Investing Nature Science & Math Social Science Social Sciences. More by Christopher Leonard.

book by Christopher Leonard. Journalist Christopher Leonard spent more than a decade covering the country s biggest meat companies, including four years as the national agribusiness reporter for the Associated Press. Business Business & Investing Nature Science & Math Social Science Social Sciences. Freed to Obey: Discovering What Galatians Says about Freedom, Obedience, and Christ's Kingdom.

An investigative journalist takes you inside the corporate meat industry—a shocking, in-depth report every American should read.How much do you know about the meat on your dinner plate? Journalist Christopher Leonard spent more than a decade covering the country’s biggest meat companies, including four years as the national agribusiness reporter for the Associated Press. Now he delivers the first comprehensive look inside the industrial meat system, exposing how a handful of companies executed an audacious corporate takeover of the nation’s meat supply.Leonard’s revealing account shines a light on the inner workings of Tyson Foods, a pioneer of the industrial system that dominates the market. You’ll learn how the food industry got to where it is today, and how companies like Tyson have escaped the scrutiny they deserve. You’ll discover how these companies are able to raise meat prices for consumers while pushing down the price they pay to farmers. And you’ll even see how big business and politics have derailed efforts to change the system, from a years-long legal fight in Iowa to the Obama administration’s recent failed attempt to pass reforms.Important, timely, and explosive, The Meat Racket is an unvarnished portrait of the food industry that now dominates America’s heartland.
  • Hawk Flying
This is a fundamentally compassionate book. It is compassionate towards the small meat producers who are squeezed by modern economies of scale, and compassionate towards the titans of industry that created these economies.

Leonard gets out of the way of the story he is trying to tell. He manages to square the paradox of conveying admiration for the ambition and accomplishments of pioneers like Don Tyson while also seeing the fruits of those achievements clearly: hollowed-out towns across rural America, and meat this is made efficiently, but ruthlessly.

Leonard dissects the distinct histories of the poultry, pork, and beef industries with precision and care. He is never preachy; where he indicts standard industry practices, he does so on the basis of meticulously gathered evidence. But he knows how not to get bogged down--the details he presents are always telling ones.

He writes with the intimate ease of an expert about both regulatory maneuvering in Washington, DC and farmers and ranchers in Arkansas and Iowa.

If you want to understand how America works today, read this book.

If you want to know how that boneless, skinless chicken breast in the supermarket was created from a chicken, how it became poultry, read this book.

It is a serious book, but also a quick read that captures you with the fluidity of its prose.

HIGHLY RECOMMEND
  • Celak
The Meat Racket is an honest and thoughtful account of the current state of meat production in our country. As a Midwestern, middle class wife and mother of a meat-eating family of five, I appreciated the window into a world that would not have been seen without this in-depth examination.

Christopher Leonard spent a decade exploring every aspect of the modern meat production process. A fascinating view into the world of Tyson and the other major meat producers is provided through Mr. Leonard’s patience to obtain a complete story from Tyson's beginning to present.

He manages to secure a meeting with Don Tyson and develops relationships with influential Tyson executives who elaborate on their experiences and roles in bolstering the company to incomparable growth. And perhaps the most significant interviews are those with the actual farmers, telling the stories of lives that are mortgaged upon a deep trust of hard work, the American dream…and the meat companies.

What surfaces from the extensive research is a winner-take-all story about how meat production in the United States shifted into the hands of a few vertically integrated companies. Through this centralized control and the filtration of profits to the top, Tyson & its few allies have become an unstoppable force, even against a determined President Obama and U.S. Department of Agriculture. In Chapter 12, ‘Street Fight (2010 – 2011),’ the meat industry’s power to influence, prevent, and shape laws is illuminated. As I reader, I was left wondering ‘how much power is too much?’

Whereas many books regarding the meat industry focus on the realities of the animal experience, The Meat Racket concentrates on the human experience. It evaluates the benefits and costs of the current system and leaves the reader fully informed. Mr. Leonard does not have an idealistic tone in his writing. There seems to be an understanding that average consumers cannot avoid these companies. Although I know products from these companies will remain in my family’s diet, I value the knowledge this book has provided.

Perhaps industrialization cannot be stopped, but at least there are journalists with the courage and determination to uncover and tell the stories, providing the public with the opportunity to be informed.

I highly recommend this book.
  • Munigrinn
I am a poultry farmer and I appreciate Mr. Leonard's shedding light on the way the industry operates. In the last seven years I have seen expenses increase with no increase in the amount I am paid per pound of chicken and in fact have seen my income fall due to production cuts, yet I have seen the large poultry companies report record profits.
  • Gom
A compelling book and a terrifying one. And a must read for anyone who's worried about what they're eating. And anyone who's ever wondered how come chicken and eggs are so cheap nowadays at the supermarket. Back in 16th century France, King Henry IV when he acceded the throne found a country devastated by war and launched what was probably History's first campaign to fight poverty and stimulate economic growth. He famously used the slogan "a chicken in every Sunday pot" - meaning that a chicken, then a luxury, should be the one meal of choice for every French family at least once a week. Now, four centuries later, we have chicken every day, we have eggs galore every morning.

But what kind of chicken is it, what kind of meat? The author does a superb investigative job to answer that question, talking to everyone at Tyson Foods (one of the biggest corporation controling the meat market, from egg to frozen food) and digging into its history. All that makes for a captivating account. What contract farming means for the farmers working for Tyson Foods is revealed in all its hair-raising details.

A pity the book doesn't go as far as I would have liked - but I shouldn't complain, after all, as its title implies, it stops at "the meat racket". Still, I would have liked to see more about what it means for consumers, I am especially worried about all the chemicals and genetic manipulations that go into modern meat production and what they do to us humans - could the current ghastly wave of obesity that has overwhelmed America and is now reaching Europe be ascribed to them? I fear so but of course I don't have the proof and this is not a book that will throw light on that aspect.

Nevertheless, as far as it goes, this is an excellent book and it should be read. Your next fried egg will never look the same to you again! And maybe one of these days, in a follow-up book, Christopher Leonard will apply his remarkable investigative talents to uncover what modern agriculture does to human health. I am looking forward to it. Meanwhile, read this book, highly recommended.