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Download Let Them Eat Prozac eBook

by David Healy

Download Let Them Eat Prozac eBook
ISBN:
1550287834
Author:
David Healy
Category:
Industries
Language:
English
Publisher:
James Lorimer & Company Ltd; 1st edition (2003)
Pages:
464 pages
EPUB book:
1605 kb
FB2 book:
1139 kb
DJVU:
1123 kb
Other formats
lrf mobi rtf mobi
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
784


This new division would be separate from the regulatory bodies and pharmaceutical companies. In "Interface between authorship, industry and science in the domain of therapeutics" a paper of 2003 for The British Journal of Psychiatry, David Healy notes that.

Let Them Eat Prozac book. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Here is a frank examination of the pharmaceutical industry and.

Let Them Eat Prozac is a double-pronged exploration, first of the SSRI drugs used to treat depression, and second .

Let Them Eat Prozac is a double-pronged exploration, first of the SSRI drugs used to treat depression, and second of the drug industry. A compelling story about mystery, deception, death, disappointment, vindication, and uncertainty. The American Psychological Association.

Let Them Eat Prozac clearly demonstrates that the problems go much deeper than a side-effect of a particular drug. The pharmaceutical industry would like us to believe that SSRIs can safely treat depression, anxiety, and a host of other mental problems. But, as Let Them Eat Prozac reveals, this cure may be worse than the disease. Nonfiction Psychology. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. But, as Let Them Eat Prozac reveals, this "cure" may be worse than the disease.

David Healy's Let Them Eat Prozac is packed with painstakingly referenced information

David Healy's Let Them Eat Prozac is packed with painstakingly referenced information. The book is deceptively panoramic in scope, ranging from ghost written article/adverts in medical journals masquerading as science, to how the line between the psychiatric community and the pharmaceutical industry has become increasingly blurred. When a drug calms a person down or energizes her - in a good way - he says "that's a good drug for that person". He has been a leading figure in psychopharmacology for many years, in part because of sponsorship by drug companies.

David’s latest book, Pharmaggedon, to be published by University of California Press in March 2012, documents the riveting and terrifying story of how pharmaceutical companies have hijacked healthcare in America and the life-threatening results

David’s latest book, Pharmaggedon, to be published by University of California Press in March 2012, documents the riveting and terrifying story of how pharmaceutical companies have hijacked healthcare in America and the life-threatening results. org, dedicated to making medicine safer through online direct patient reporting of drug effects.

I turn Car Compressor into Working Engine - Продолжительность: 34:59 Lets Learn Something Recommended for you. 34:59

Prozac - Продолжительность: 2:08 Dr. Faber's Straight Talk on Psychiatry Recommended for you. 2:08. I turn Car Compressor into Working Engine - Продолжительность: 34:59 Lets Learn Something Recommended for you. 34:59. Настя и папа играют в магазин игрушек и отель - Продолжительность: 12:08 Like Nastya Vlog Recommended for you.

by. Healy, David MRC Psych. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Compare similar products. David Healy is professor of psychiatry at Cardiff University and a former secretary of the British Association for Psychopharmacology

Compare similar products. Let Them Eat Prozac: The Unhealthy Relationship Between the Pharmaceutical Industry and Depression by David Healy (Paperback, 2006). David Healy is professor of psychiatry at Cardiff University and a former secretary of the British Association for Psychopharmacology. He is the author of over 120 articles and 12 books, including The Antidepressant Era and The Creation of Psychopharmacology. Country of Publication.

  • Weiehan
A book to read if somebody in your family is considering taking SSRI. Not so much to go agaisnt medical advice but to recognize subsequent side effect that would alert the family member to an untoward reaction from taking the medication. A good book to read also for physicians who are prescribing or seeing patients who take SSRIs. This book goes into many details , from case studies to marketing and legal issues concerning the pharmaceutical companies 's handling of SSRIs. It is a compelling case for a cover up for serious side effects. Even if it only looks at one side of the story, it is a pretty large burden of proof. Not an easy read.
  • Preve
Having been a pharmacist for 24 yrs I can say with depressing certainty that MDs have absolutely minimal understanding of the drugs they prescribe. They receive only the barest instruction in pharmacology in med school, and the majority of their ongoing drug education seems to come from pharmaceutical reps. This book just further validates observations I have already made about the side effects of Prozac and its cousins. The detail involved in the handling of the subject matter may be too technical for the casual reader but would be fascinating to healthcare professionals and attorneys. It underscores the penalties to be paid by honest researchers and healthcare professionals in this market-driven economy by those who dare to challenge the data put out by companies with huge profits to make and to protect--and who also have the financial resources to ruin anyone who tells the truth about their products. It reinforces what should be a guiding principal in most areas of life: before believing what you are told, ask who profits by your gullibility and need. And do not be too quick to distrust your own instincts and observations.
  • the monster
This important book undermines its effectiveness by jumbling together several distinct story lines:
1. The influence of pharmaceutical money on science and the practice of medicine.
2. The value of antidepressants versus their troubling side effects, most notably suicidality.
3. The legal battles over (a) the "Prozac defense" and (b) product liability of Lilly for adverse drug reactions.
4. Dr. Healy's personal travails as a result of his concerns about the safety of SSRI's.

Jumbling these related-but-different issues together results in a murky book, in which none of the four stories emerges clearly.

In general, Dr. Healy's views on these issues seem to be
1. Pharmaceutical money has badly corrupted both science and clinical practice.
2. Antidepressants and other psychotropics are important tools, but because the science and clinical practice have been skewed by pharmaceutical companies, they are over-prescribed, mis-prescribed, and generally used injudiciously.
3. The only reason his side has lost the legal battles that it has lost is the corrupt influence of pharma, and
4. He got screwed by the Evil powers.

I found the cases he made for points 1 and 2 (if I teased them out of the murk correctly) fairly persuasive, the case for point 3 provocative but not entirely compelling, and the case for point 4 hard to judge.

If you have a fair amount of patience and a serious interest in the different story lines Dr. Healy addresses, and if you know enough about the methodological issues involved in different ways of doing research to evaluate his criticisms of the preferred methodologies of pharmaceutical-funded research, the book is certainly worth reading. Otherwise, I suspect you will find the book more confusing and (probably) misleading than enlightening.
  • Fohuginn
Wonderful book!
  • Monn
Author David Healy is psychiatrist and a former secretary of the British Association for Psychopharmacology, as well as the author of other books such as Pharmageddon,The Creation of Psychopharmacology,The Antidepressant Era, etc. He was also one of the early doctors to begin prescribing Prozac. He wrote in the Preface to this 2004 book, "Rooms full of data pointed to the fact that the Prozac drug group could trigger suicide and violence, and that companies reproducing these drugs knew of the problem... The Prozac story brings interlinked problems to light, among them a creation of depression on ... a scale as to raise questions about whether pharmaceutical and other health care companies are more wedded to making profits from health than contributing to it... pharmaceutical companies are now better at marketing drugs than at making them." (Pg. xiii-xiv) He adds, "I write this as someone committed to pharmacotherapy. In my opinion... hoping psychotherapy alone will do the job, is a romantic notion... This book is a history in that some of the key questions have now been answered conclusively---SSRIs can trigger suicidal tendencies. But it is still not clear what has been an honest mistake and what a conspiracy." (Pg. xvi)

He notes, "After publication of the article of SSRIs and suicide ... I received calls from the Citizen's Commission on Human Rights, an organization linked to the Church of Scientology... I refused to take any of the calls. The Church of Scientology was not a group with whom I would wish to have any association. Indeed, their espousal of the 'Prozac is a problem' position made me, and I'm sure others who saw problems with Prozac, more sympathetic to [drug manufacturer] Lilly's position." (Pg. 55)

In a court case, he notes that two "negative" testifiers "completely missed the issue of how relatively ineffective Prozac was for depression. No one asked the simple question: If Prozac was a better serotonin reputake inhibitor than older antidepressants, and if serotonin was lowered in depression, why wasn't Prozac bringing about recoveries in hospital depressions quicker than older drugs?... In their effort to land a punch on this target, they missed the fact that Prozac couldn't be shown to work at all in severe depression." (Pg. 69-70)

He states, "there is no longer any guarantee that publication even in the most prestigious journals means that the results adequately reflect the data from clinical trials. And as the SSRI and suicide story unfolds... we will see how a number of the best-known journals have published articles on ths SSRI and suicide issue so riddled with gross methodological inadequacies that it becomes difficult to see how they could ever have been published on the basis of scientific merit." (Pg. 119)

He laments, "No one had warned these women they might ever feel the way they had done on either of these pills. One study had been about how well people could be and whether anyone could be made 'better than well.' We never thought to warn anyone about suicidal ideation. Even with my background, I saw the possibility of making totally normal people suicidal in this way as a merely theoretical risk." (Pg. 185) He adds, "This material had been lying around for years before the first public concerns were raised for Prozac. Why had it played no part in the debate hitherto? Why did regulators not know that what these studies had found? Why were no academic voices raised demanding access to this material?... Was it merely coincidence that pretty much as soon as I walked through the door of Pfizer's archives to look for these data, I got the sack?" (Pg. 193)

He notes, "One of the many chilling things about the Prozac story is that a mistake or consequence or a conspiracy would probably have cost fewer lives. Instead, a sequence of historical events made a poor drug fashionable, made the treatment of an illness all but a matter of public policy, and removed the natural cautions and safeguards that should have saved us. In the midst of this, the one group with a professional brief, because of prescription-only arrangments, to save us from ourselves---physicians---appears to have followed its self-interest as much, if not more, than any other party to the story." (Pg. 251) He suggests, "Making the raw data available would do more to keep researchers and universities honest than any of the research safeguards or ethical frameworks that universities are busily trying to put in place to manage links between industry and academia." (Pg. 278)

This book will be of keen interest to anyone studying contemporary psychopharmacology.