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Download Do's and Taboos of Using English Around the World eBook

by Roger E. Axtell

Download Do's and Taboos of Using English Around the World eBook
ISBN:
0471308412
Author:
Roger E. Axtell
Category:
International
Language:
English
Publisher:
Wiley; 1 edition (April 1995)
Pages:
224 pages
EPUB book:
1621 kb
FB2 book:
1994 kb
DJVU:
1899 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.7
Votes:
164


Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Roger E. Axtell (Author). The first part deals with the idiosyncrasies of American English, the second part with English varieties around the world, and the last part, which makes up over half of the book, with helpful advice on becoming a global communicator. If you are a native English speaker, then the first two sections of this book may not be that interesting, as much of what is said may already be known to you.

The New Yorker calls Roger Axtell. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

The New Yorker calls Roger Axtell. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Do's and Taboos of Using English Around the World as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 233-234) and index. The power of gestures - The most popular gestures - Special types of gestures - Gestures: head to toe - The ultimate gesture - The innocent abroad's shortlist - Country-by-country listing. Lists and illustrates gestures and explains their meanings in eighty-two countries around the world, along with information about rules of decorum and when to make eye contact and touch.

Do's and Taboos of Humor Around the World: Stories and Tips from Business and Life. Do's and Taboos of Public Speaking: How to Get Those Butterflies Flying in Formation. The Do's and Taboos of Hosting International Visitors. Do's and Taboos Around the World for Women in Business. Mary Beth Lamb, Roger E. Axtell, Tami Briggs, Margaret Corcoran. Essential Do's and Taboos: The Complete Guide to International Business and Leisure Travel.

Roger Axtell is an internationalist Emily Post

Roger Axtell is an internationalist Emily Post. The New Yorker International business and leisure travel etiquette expert Roger Axtell's bestselling Do's and Taboos books have helped hundreds of thousands of business travelers and tourists avoid the missteps and misunderstandings the world traveler can encounter.

Axtel is a former VP of Worldwide Marketing for the Parker Pen company who has spent 30 years living and traveling abroad

Axtel is a former VP of Worldwide Marketing for the Parker Pen company who has spent 30 years living and traveling abroad. This book is aimed at anyone trying to be understood while speaking English with non-native speakers at home or abroad. Axtel also makes important distinctions between English speakers from different countries. The book features both amusing anecdotes and helpful advice.

Axtell, Roger E. MISSIONWORLD - Gestures: The Do's and Taboos of (2) January (2) A beginner s guide to the deep cultural experience: beneath the surface How to think theologically 2013 (6) December (5). 6 : Gestures: The Do's and Taboos of - AbeBooks

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Do's and Taboos of Using English Around . Roger Axtell is the international Emily Post.

Roger Axtell is the international Emily Post.

"Roger Axtell is the international Emily Post."-The New Yorker English has become the global language-the dominant language used in international trade, science, technology, and travel. But for most Americans, the potential for linguistic misunderstanding, confusion, and embarrassment when using English with nonnative speakers is greater now than ever. In this essential guide, veteran international businessman and raconteur Roger E. Axtell shows you how to use English successfully in any business or social context-and how to avoid making embarrassing or misleading statements to people who are trying to understand you. Inside you'll find: * Valuable rules for making yourself understood when communicating with people from other cultures * Dozens of amusing anecdotes that illustrate the potential trials and pitfalls of using American English around the world * The important differences between American English and the English spoken in Great Britain, Canada, Australia, and South Africa * Helpful advice on using interpreters and translators * Special sections on communicating in English with speakers of other languages, including Japanese, German, French, and Italian * Tips on telephone conversation and dangerous cognates
  • Thetalen
This book has little value except as a very elementary introduction to intercultural encounter. As the cover illustration suggests, Axtell points out some of the large number idioms that flavor the speech (and writing) of Americans. For someone who has never tried to bridge a cultural gap, such awareness is an important first step. For everyone else, the book is only a light read, good for stretches of an international flight when the movie isn't interesting and you can't fall asleep. The entire third chapter is devoted to amusing errors made by Americans when speaking English.

The only serious analysis comes near the end of the last chapter when Axtell outlines four levels of language proficiency: 100-word level, courtesy level, survival level, and near fluency (which he sagely suggests requires six months of living in a foreign culture in addition to classroom study).

As several reviewers have stated, this book is far too superficial in its description of other cultures. But there is a bigger problem: the very notion of "taboos" is a holdover from the 19th century attitude that foreign cultures are inherently dangerous -- a misstep might get you eaten by a cannibal, for example. However, TV has made people around the globe aware of other cultures, even if the viewers live in areas so remote that Americans and other foreigners (from their viewpoint) rarely if ever set foot there. This means most of humanity already knows that differences exist and therefore everyone has some degree of tolerance for unfamiliar behaviors.

Even books that focus on a single culture (in contrast to Axtell's scattered attempt to introduce many cultures) usually fail to go deeper that listing a bunch of warnings. Perhaps intercultural communication guides sell better by scaring readers into thinking that a single misstep could blow a billion dollar deal that was about to be clinched. Nevertheless, diplomats, entrepreneurs, and long-time expatriates generally recognize that finding common ground between cultures is at least as essential as respecting differences. Common sense is important, too: don't get angry, listen attentively, etc.
  • Landarn
Do's and Taboos of Using English Around the World is primarily written with the international business traveler in mind, but it is also useful for teachers and students of English as a foreign language. Indeed, the book is written in such a simple and entertaining style as to make it appealing to just about anyone remotely interested in language or travel. It is divided into three sections. The first part deals with the idiosyncrasies of American English, the second part with English varieties around the world, and the last part, which makes up over half of the book, with helpful advice on becoming a global communicator. If you are a native English speaker, then the first two sections of this book may not be that interesting, as much of what is said may already be known to you. As an English teacher, I found the latter part of the book to be the most useful because of its coverage of the subtle differences in English communication throughout the world. Of course, this book is not serious reading if you are a linguist or a scholar, but Axtell does a fine job of offering good advice to any newcomer to Japan, my home for the past ten years. If I were to complain about this book, I would say that some of his anecdotes are a little bit contrived and others rather dull. Also, the grocer's apostrophe in the book's title; are we going to get rid of it or quote it in a later edition in the series?
  • Purestone
Axtell's capsule treatments of various cultures are too superficial for all but the most oblivious travelers. In his attempt to include a multitude of countries and customs, nothing gets decent coverage. Though it's doubtful anyone would expect a book about using English to serve as a foreign-language phrasebook, the brief appendix tries to do just that, contributing to the book's scattershot feel.
The Church Lady seems to have ghostwritten five pages of Chapter 5, where we are informed of the Canadians' "special heritage," Quebecers' "special pride in their ethnic heritage," and Australians' "special brand of coined and abbreviated words," not to mention their "special brand of lingo."
This book is for you if you're an after-dinner speaker who needs cute anecdotes about language and cultural snafus, or if lists of misstatements like "Our Father who art in heaven, Howard be thy name," send you into convulsions of laughter. But it's not essential travel reading.