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Download Modeling Japanese-American Trade: A Study of Asymmetric Interdependence (Harvard Economic Studies) eBook

by Peter A. Petri

Download Modeling Japanese-American Trade: A Study of Asymmetric Interdependence (Harvard Economic Studies) eBook
ISBN:
0674578104
Author:
Peter A. Petri
Category:
International
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harvard University Press (September 26, 1984)
Pages:
232 pages
EPUB book:
1110 kb
FB2 book:
1616 kb
DJVU:
1721 kb
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Rating:
4.4
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214


Harvard Economic Studies 156. Modeling Japanese-American Trade. A Study of Asymmetric Interdependence.

Harvard Economic Studies 156. This book examines, in rigorous, quantitative detail, the structure of trade between Japan and the United States, tracing the evolution of trade interdependence and the causes of its increasing intensity. It also looks at sectoral differences in interdependence-at the patterns behind changes in the composition of trade and the complex factors that determine how individual sectors of each economy respond to economic change in all the others.

Find nearly any book by Peter a. Petri. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Trans-Pacific Partnership and Asia-Pacific Integration: A Quantitative Assessment (Policy Analyses in International Economics). by Dean R. Leimer, Peter a.

Peter Alexander Petri, Hungarian economist, educator, director. Grantee Study of Japanese Trade, United States State Department, 1980, Study of the United States Social Security, Social Security Administration, 1982-1983, International Business Education, United States Department Education, 1989, 92, 94, Center for Global Partnership, since 1995, National Science Foundation, 1995; Economic Policy fellow Brookings Institute, 1979. Professor of Economic Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, since 1974. Dean Graduate School International Economics and Finance, since 1994.

Modeling Japanese-American Trade: A Study of Asymmetric Interdependence. United States-Japan economic conflict has four major dimensions: the large global trade imbalances of the two countries, structural differences between them, a large number of sectoral disputes, and their joint responsibility for global prosperity and stability. Two leading experts on United States-Japan economic relations examine the macroeconomic and microeconomic causes of these frictions and assess possible policy responses, including several variants of "managed trade.

CURRICULUM VITAE Peter A. Modeling Japanese-American Trade: A Study of Asymmetric Interdependence, Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984. The Economics of the Dollar Cycle, MIT Press, 1990. Japanese translation published by Nihon Keizai Shimbun Sha, 1989. Trading with the Dynamos: East Asian Interdependence and American Interests," in Current History, Vol. 93, No. 587, pp. 407-412, December 1994. Reprinted in Proceedings of APEC Symposium: "The Pacific Community: Economic Opportunities," Washington: Insitute of International Education.

This study situates Sino-Indian economic interaction under the interdependence framework. The findings challenge the direction of interdependence in this dyad normally gleaned from nominal trade data. This study situates Sino-Indian economic interaction under the interdependence framework. By mapping conflict behavior in this dyad against the trends in the economic interdependence, we find a discernible shift away from escalation (high-level conflict) towards bargaining (diplomatic contestation).

a study of asymmetric interdependence. Harvard economic studies ;, v. 156. Classifications. Published 1984 by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass. viii, 218 p. : Number of pages.

A trade study or trade-off study is the activity of a multidisciplinary team to identify the most balanced technical solutions among a set of proposed viable solutions (FAA 2006). These viable solutions are judged by their satisfaction of a series of measures or cost functions. These measures describe the desirable characteristics of a solution. They may be conflicting or even mutually exclusive.

Economic Interdependence and War is international relations on a gigantic scale. Copeland asks big questions, makes big arguments, engages big alternatives, and tests them all on big powers over a big time span. Books like this one are a healthy reminder that there remains trenchant things to say about the big picture. The book's central arguments and findings will also be of clear interest and importance for current and future policy makers as they seek to grapple with the long-term effects of increasing economic interdependence. This landmark book makes bold arguments and parallel big achievements.

This book examines, in rigorous, quantitative detail, the structure of trade between Japan and the United States, tracing the evolution of trade interdependence and the causes of its increasing intensity. It also looks at sectoral differences in interdependence‚Äēat the patterns behind changes in the composition of trade and the complex factors that determine how individual sectors of each economy respond to economic change in all the others.

In the first part, the author designs and estimates a multicountry, multisectoral general equilibrium model. The model is operationalized with careful estimates of the parameters that govern demand, production, and trade in both economies. In the second part, the model is employed to explore various aspects of interdependence and commercial policy. Peter Petri's findings indicate, among other things, that the American and Japanese economies are more closely related than one might judge from the size of their trade. As a result of differences in the structures of the two economies, their interdependence is sharply asymmetric, with economic events in the United States having a greater impact on Japan than vice versa. The study also shows that the roots of bilateral conflict can be traced to structural causes, and suggests that recent structural changes may have increased the incentives for protectionism.