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Download Get a Life: You Don't Need a Million to Retire Well eBook

by Ralph E. Warner

Download Get a Life: You Don't Need a Million to Retire Well eBook
ISBN:
0873375831
Author:
Ralph E. Warner
Category:
Personal Finance
Language:
English
Publisher:
Nolo.com; 3rd edition (June 2001)
Pages:
336 pages
EPUB book:
1558 kb
FB2 book:
1704 kb
DJVU:
1441 kb
Other formats
lit docx doc lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
865


Warner takes on the financial service industry's maxim that to avoid financial destitution in old age, Americans need to put aside larger sums of money that they are currently doing.

Warner takes on the financial service industry's maxim that to avoid financial destitution in old age, Americans need to put aside larger sums of money that they are currently doing. Warner also advises readers on a number of other ways to enjoy the retirement years, including maintaining good health, having friends and close family ties, and enjoying varied interests and activities.

Despite its subtitle, this book says very little about how much money you need to retire. Its advice is somewhere between mediocre and decent

Despite its subtitle, this book says very little about how much money you need to retire. Its advice is somewhere between mediocre and decent. It advocates low-cost index funds, which is nice, but some of the other advice is not all that great.

The real-life interviews are now some 20 years old and they don't feel as appropriate to today's world.

Warner puts a different spin on how to prepare for retirement by recognizing that a sensible savings plan is important, but the real keys to successful retirement are good health, spiritual life, relationships with family and friends, and having interesting things to do. His mission in this book is to identify the habits and life-style choices that set zestful people apart from those who spend their last years bored, lonely, and depressed. The real-life interviews are now some 20 years old and they don't feel as appropriate to today's world. 7 people found this helpful.

Warner, Ralph E. Publication date. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AltheaB on February 23, 2010.

Get a Life You Dont Need a Million to Retire Well Book Revie. Повторите попытку позже. Запланировано на 21 сент.

Not true, states Ralph Warner, Nolo co-founder and the author of Get a Life.

Although a sensible savings plan makes good horse sense, many other actions and decisions will determine whether you enjoy your retirement years.

Product Description Retire happy and healthy without keeping a million bucks in the bank! . Not true, states Ralph Warner, Nolo co-founder and the author of Get a Life.

Although a sensible savings plan makes good horse sense, many other actions and decisions will determine whether

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Warner takes on the financial service industry's maxim that to avoid financial destitution in old age, Americans need to put aside larger sums of money that they are currently doing. Get this torrent Anonymous Download.

The financial-service industry wants you to believe that in order to avoid financial destitution, you need to put aside huge amounts of money that you -- let's say it together -- "should have begun saving years ago."

Not true, states Warner, the author of Get a Life. Although a sensible savings plan makes good horse sense, many other actions and decisions will determine whether you enjoy your retirement years.

Get a Life shows you how to beat the anxiety surrounding retirement, and to develop a plan to make your golden years the best of your life by:

* developing family relationships * maintaining and creating friendships * improving health * keeping active * developing a robust curiosity for the world * realistically calculating how much money you need and how to secure it

Interviews with successful (and successfully) retired people illustrate how to put Warner's advice into action.

  • Prorahun
I'm not sure if the author is still alive, but this book needs to be updated to include the financial crisis of 2008 and the Great Recession and show examples of how people either approaching retirement or already in retirement came through that period and what, if any, adjustments they had to make in their expectations and actual plans.

Overall, the basic theme is pretty timeless in terms of not making retirement solely about money. Yes, money can bring peace of mind and reduce anxieties, but it doesn't guarantee a happy, productive retirement. That's what the book is about and that is what it delivers.

The real-life interviews are now some 20 years old and they don't feel as appropriate to today's world.
  • Jonide
This is a good book for all those millennial and Gen-x people who keep saying "I am never going to retire because I can't afford it", as if that was even going to be a choice anyway. Explains how to determine how much and what you will really need, and how these things are obtainable. Contradicts the pessimism created by over generalizations and just plain misleading statements one reads on the web about retirement. Some people will find retirement planning more possible with reachable goals rather than facing an impossible task.
  • fabscf
The authors take a very different approach from most retirement planning books. Rather than talk to financial planners, who emphasize the money angle and have never themselves retired, the authors talk to people who've retired and have made a go of it. What's the secret? When you think about it, it's pretty simple. Stay healthy. Have many friends, including younger friends. Make peace within your family and get to the point where you love and enjoy your adult children. Oh yes. Money. Money comes way down on the list of concerns. Many financial planners say you'll need 80% of your present income when you retire. But the authors say the real number is closer to 50%, particularly if your home is paid off. The bottom line is that retirement is about far more than money, and you should be enjoying a healthy, productive life now, not just dreaming of your retirement while stressing yourself to the breaking point. My insurance company, USAA, which also sells financial products, recommended this book. It speaks well of USAA that they recommended a couple books that downplay the financial angle. I recommend this book--it'll give you pause and help you reorient your priorities.
  • Lightbinder
I have to admit I would have been far more skeptical about the points made in this book if I hadn't seen people already living on far less than a million dollars...and doing just fine.

One lived independently for years (admittedly, not on a champagne and caviar budget, but not poorly,either) and then moved into a nursing home, all expenses paid. This person is happy. Health costs have not driven that person to poverty and the medical care is just fine.

Another friend lives modestly but has family and friends nearby, an active social life and lives in a lovely Arts and Crafts style bungalow, bought for a modest amount and very tastefully decorated. She lives (as this book suggests) a life full of meaningful activities, many of them free, some of them volunteer work, some of them low-cost or free programs such as concerts in the parks or nature programs or lectures. Again, not an expensive lifestyle.. but fully satisfying.

ONE SUGGESTION: If you read this book, it is quite possible that you can start NOW to learn to live on far less money than you may be spending mindlessly today - and not feel deprived. If you do that, of course, you may save even more for your later years, when health issues and other concerns may impact your finances in a less predictable manner than today.

In any case, this is a refreshing change from the books which promote worry and anxiety about not being able to afford retirement. This book advocates finding a happy medium, neither advocating a "no savings" plan or needless worry and obsessions about the future and doomsday scenarios.
  • Dilmal
I first read this book years ago, but turned my copy in to Good Will as I was trying to bring my library down to a more manageable size. Several years after I had given it up, I bought a copy again through Amazon. This book is well written and full of good, practical advice about planning the stage of your life that comes after you quit working full time. This is not a bit dated.
  • Priotian
I got the earlier edition of this book at a local book share (i.e., for free) and purchased the more recent edition from Amazon as a gift for a family member. This book is great inspiration for those who are not yet ready for retirement but are planning with their heads and hearts! Mr. Warner drives the point home that it's not all about the money but what you do with it and that retirement should be a joyful episode in life. The reason I am giving this 4 stars instead of 5 is that I wish the author/editors would keep updating and publishing this book as the economy changes.
  • Arlana
Good book focusing on building your life, not just your money. Only thing I found wrong was authors disuasion of real estate as a good retirement choice. I have a lot of stocks and a lot of real estate, and I get much more peace of mind knowing my rentals will produce month to month. Cash flow and leverage are easy with remtals, not so with mutual funds.
I read someones comments, that there is "too much deperveration" in this book. I think they need to re-read it. The whole point is NOT to have too little, but to have what's right. This book confirms my long held belief that you can save "too much" and miss what's good for the now. On the other hand, chances are you will live a good while, so you cannot neglict that either. This book shows how to do both. The mindset of many people is just plain wrong, and this book, even if you don't agree with it, shows another way of thinking. Based on the retired people I know, it rings VERY true. Health, Friends, Family are first, the money part can be managed. You should read this book. It's very good.