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Download Ancient Rome (History in Art) eBook

by Peter Chrisp

Download Ancient Rome (History in Art) eBook
ISBN:
1410905209
Author:
Peter Chrisp
Category:
Arts Music & Photography
Language:
English
Publisher:
Heinemann-Raintree (September 15, 2005)
Pages:
48 pages
EPUB book:
1969 kb
FB2 book:
1433 kb
DJVU:
1516 kb
Other formats
lit docx mobi txt
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
594


Peter Chrisp (born 20 May 1958) is a British children's author of books on history.

Peter Chrisp (born 20 May 1958) is a British children's author of books on history. With over eighty books published, his various works include Blitzkrieg!, Dorling Kindersley's Ancient Egypt Revealed and Ancient Rome Revealed, The Spanish Conquests of the New World, and many more. He first began writing history after working on the Mass-Observation archive at the University of Sussex. He has also worked as a writer on the online project "Icons of England".

Paintings of ancient history and mythology. Non-topical/index: Categories of ancient Rome.

Gustave Boulanger - Theatrical Rehearsal in the House of an Ancient Rome Poet - WGA2930. jpg 1,247 779; 110 KB. Gustave Boulanger The Flute Concert. jpg 800 482; 211 KB. Herbert Schmalz, Faithful Unto Death – Christianae ad Leones (1897). Paintings of ancient history and mythology.

Ancient Rome has created some of the greatest art the world has ever seen. Learn about why and how this art was made in this fascinating title.

Ancient History Encyclopedia Foundation is a non-profit organization. Become a Member Donate.

Introduction to ancient Roman art. Ancient Rome (virtual reality tour). Roman art was now put to the service of aggrandizing the ruler and his family. The Social History of Roman Art. Rome's history in four faces at The Met. Damnatio memoriae-Roman sanctions against memory. Digging through time. It was also meant to indicate shifts in leadership. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2008.

In this book there are eight see-through pages that reveal Roman soldiers storming a fort, gladiators locked in combat, Pompeii buried under the ash of a volcano, and a magnificent Roman villa. This volume is written by Peter Chrisp, author of over 50 children's history books, in consultation with Dr. Hugh Bowden, lecturer in Ancient History at King's College London.

Art History Books by Christopher . Eye and Art in Ancient Greece: A Study in Archaeoaesthetics Harvey Miller, 2018. Print Publishing in Sixteenth-Century Rome: Growth and Expansion, Rivalry and Murder Harvey Miller, 2008

Art History Books by Christopher . Print Publishing in Sixteenth-Century Rome: Growth and Expansion, Rivalry and Murder Harvey Miller, 2008.

Discover the facts about ancient history, including the Celts, the Picts, the Minoans, the Etruscans and others on HISTORY. Today's world owes an immense debt to the mighty empires and great cities of ancient history

Discover the facts about ancient history, including the Celts, the Picts, the Minoans, the Etruscans and others on HISTORY. Today's world owes an immense debt to the mighty empires and great cities of ancient history. Their inventions and ideas enabled the advancement of human society and laid the foundation for modern life.

Peter Connolly illustration of a latrine in the Roman forum. Oh yes, let us take a dump together in public and use the community troughs to clean our poop sticks. That's very sanitary. Public latrines to seat as many as 100 people, near the Theatre of Pompey, Rome. Illustration by Peter Connolly. Peter Connolly illustration of a latrine in the Roman forum. Ancient Aliens Ancient Egyptian Art Ancient History Queen Nefertiti Architecture Antique Art Ancien Egyptian Mythology Egypt Art Cairo Egypt.

An illustrated journey through ancient Rome, aimed at children of eight or more and the family reference market. The book is divided into four main subject areas, each led by an acetate spread that transports the reader into a particular scene and topic. The acetate spreads focus in on a particular story or example, while the follow-up spreads develop the themes, introduced by these acetates, in greater detail. Peel back the layers of a perilous volcano as it creates destruction in Pompeii or see Roman soldiers storming a fort.
  • Vital Beast
What can I say, I wish there were more of these dealing with history. My daughter loves them, and I don't have all the prep work of History Pockets.
  • Netlandinhabitant
This was entertaining and informative. It's one in a series, the best of which: Ancient Greece Revealed, is unfortunately out of print, but still, these are a very fun way to teach kids their history!
  • Malann
Great!
  • Rainshaper
Although I have not begun to use this book with my 2 boys, 9 and 13, yet, as we are currently reading a story about Rome (I home school), I have perused it thoroughly and believe Ancient Rome is covered at their level in a thorough and captivating way. My boys will enjoy the actual photographs and well-done drawings, along with the fast facts, without bogging down in great detail. D-K does a great job with all of their books, and this workbook, a new venture, is no exception, in my opinion. This book looks engaging, interesting and I believe they will learn a lot from it. The only thing that irks me (as a Christian), is that DK has become politically correct in that they changed the dating system in this book from BC (Before Christ) to BCE (Before the Common Era) and AD (Anno Domini, year of our Lord) to CE (Common Era). I will ignore their system and use the BC and AD designations instead. (And I will be Politically INcorrect by stating emphatically that ALL of history still revolves around the fact that our Savior Jesus Christ was prophesied (BC) and that He came to die and rise to save us (AD). He is the pivotal point of ALL history and the world has never been the same since His arrival. Millions of people have led changed lives due to the life of "God with us," and no history is complete without recognizing His role and the changes He wrought.) Interestingly enough, it was the ancient Romans' invention of the torturous form of execution--crucifixion--that ended Jesus' life.
  • Tetaian
"Ancient Rome" is the second DK Revealed book that I have seen and my original comment that the see-through pages add very little to what is a solid book without them still applies. In this book there are eight see-through pages that reveal Roman soldiers storming a fort, gladiators locked in combat, Pompeii buried under the ash of a volcano, and a magnificent Roman villa. They provide some basic cut-away views, which are okay, but given what DK has normally provided in their richly illustrated books I was really expecting something spectacular. Indeed, even without the see-through pages "Ancient Rome" is a wonderful look at the glory that was Rome.
This volume is written by Peter Chrisp, author of over 50 children's history books, in consultation with Dr. Hugh Bowden, lecturer in Ancient History at King's College London. It traces the story of Rome from city to republic to empire, looking at legionaries on the march, the emphasis on bread and circuses, and the excavations of Pompeii and Herculaneum that have revealed so much about the life and leisure of the Romans. The illustrations include not only photographs of ancient ruins and artifacts, but also modern recreations and shots from movies like "Cleopatra" and "Ben Hur." Young readers will not get a detailed history of ancient Rome, but they will find lots of interesting details, which is why this is more of a supplemental volume to the study of Rome than a primary source.
As always pay attention to the captions for the wonderful illustrations because that is where a lot of these details pop up. The archeological perspective is especially interesting this time around, showing how some of these ancient wonders are uncovered. Other volumes in the DK Revealed series are devoted to "Ancient Egypt" and the "Human Body," and they may well be able to succeed on the additional level of those see-through pages.
  • Ginaun
In his lousy children's book Ancient Rome (2005, Raintree, Reed Elsevier, Inc.) Peter Chrisp is so wildly anti-Christian that it boggles the mind. He describes Christ merely as some Jewish teacher, founder of some run of the mill sect. He laments more for the crosses scratched onto the Roman temple walls than for the countless Christians thrown to wild beasts.

I know that many historians write what they wish was true about early Christianity, but shouldn't they leave their inaccurate biases out of children's books?

If you are an atheistic or secular household, this book might be for you. Don't let me stop you! It will lull you and your children into a false impression that Christianity was nothing but some vague movement that had a penchant for defacing Roman Temples (post 400AD).

Maybe I'm being a little too hard on Mr. Chrisp. The fashionable writing these days is to minimize all aspects of Early Christianity or to portray it in the harshest light possible. But Jeeesh! doesn't getting eaten by lions get you any respect anymore??

Maybe I'm making mountains out of molehills here. The text of my review is about as long as the text he devotes to Early Christianity. But his book so willfully ignores any positive aspect of Early Christianity.
  • Rasmus
*a must for visual learners. 45 pages of photographs and blurbs that get the information right into their eyeballs and their brains. Kids love DK books.

Sample vocabulary: amphitheather, aqueduct, atrium, barbarians, catapult, century, circus, cohort..."

USes BCE/CE instead of B.C./A.D.