almediah.fr
» » Manolito Four-Eyes: The 1st Volume of the Great Encyclopedia of My Life

Download Manolito Four-Eyes: The 1st Volume of the Great Encyclopedia of My Life eBook

by Emilio Urberuaga,Elvira Lindo

Download Manolito Four-Eyes: The 1st Volume of the Great Encyclopedia of My Life eBook
ISBN:
0761457291
Author:
Emilio Urberuaga,Elvira Lindo
Category:
Geography & Cultures
Language:
English
Publisher:
Two Lions (October 1, 2010)
Pages:
160 pages
EPUB book:
1119 kb
FB2 book:
1145 kb
DJVU:
1671 kb
Other formats
doc docx azw lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
759


Elvira Lindo’s series about the adventures of Manolito Four-Eyes is a children’s classic in Spain, where it has inspired feature . For me, the biggest problem is the slangy style of the book. It feels absolutely forced, and I have to wonder if it reads more smoothly and naturally in Spanish.

Elvira Lindo’s series about the adventures of Manolito Four-Eyes is a children’s classic in Spain, where it has inspired feature films and a TV series. It is also popular in other European countries. She also works as a screenwriter, and she often contributes to El País newspaper, which is widely read in Spain and Latin America.

Manolito Four-Eyes book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Manolito Four-Eyes: The 1st Volume of the Great Encyclopedia of My Life as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Lindo, Elvira, 1962-; Urberuaga, Emilio, ill; Travalia, Caroline. Ten-year-old Manolito recounts further exploits in his small Madrid neighborhood with his grandfather, his little brother "the Bozo," and his school friends, including a shoplifting prank, recycled art, and the Filthy Feet Gang.

Items related to Manolito Four-Eyes: The 1st Volume of the Great . Emilio Urberuaga is a writer and illustrator in Spain whose work has been published all over the world

Items related to Manolito Four-Eyes: The 1st Volume of the Great Encyclopedia. Elvira Lindo Manolito Four-Eyes: The 1st Volume of the Great Encyclopedia of My Life. ISBN 13: 9780761457299. Elvira Lindo’s series about the adventures of Manolito Four-Eyes is a children’s classic in Spain, where it has inspired feature films and a TV series. Emilio Urberuaga is a writer and illustrator in Spain whose work has been published all over the world. Joanne Moriarty grew up in Quincy, Massachusetts, and currently resides in Brooklyn. She is a Spanish interpreter at New York Presbyterian Hospital in Manhattan.

Adventure Books for Kids. By (author) Elvira Lindo, Illustrated by Emilio Urberuaga. Manolito Four-Eyes: The 3rd Volume of the Great Encyclopedia of My Life. Great Encyclopedia of My Life. We can notify you when this item is back in stock. Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Author Elvira Lindo's series about the adventures of Manolito Four-Eyes is a children's classic in Spain, where it has .

Author Elvira Lindo's series about the adventures of Manolito Four-Eyes is a children's classic in Spain, where it has inspired feature films and a TV series, and is also widely popular in other European countries. She also works as a screenwriter, and her weekly column in El País newspaper is widely read in Spain and Latin America. She lives half of the year in New York City.

Manolito Four-Eyes: The 1st Volume of the Great Encyclopedia of My Life by Elvira Lindo & Emilio Urberuaga. Join the unforgettable Manolito as he takes on life in Madrid. The bestselling phenomenon from Spain about ten-year-old Manolito’s misadventures in Madrid. Don’t try to be different, says Manolito’s mother. 11. We're Going on a Lion Hunt by Margery Cuyler & Joe Mathieu.

The unforgettable Manolito Four-Eyes is back

The unforgettable Manolito Four-Eyes is back.

November 13, 2015 History. found in the catalog Manolito Four-Eyes : the 2nd volume of the great encyclopedia of my l. .1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Manolito Four-Eyes : the 2nd volume of the great encyclopedia of my life from your list? Manolito Four-Eyes : the 2nd volume of the great encyclopedia of my life.

The bestselling phenomenon from Spain about ten-year-old Manolito’s misadventures in Madrid.

“Don’t try to be different,” says Manolito’s mother. But he can’t help it—he doesn’t have to try. Whether he’s fighting over the One-and-Only Susana, trying not to fight with Ozzy the Bully, telling his entire life story to the school psychologist, or discovering the true meaning of World Peace, ten-year-old Manolito is a real original. As he’d say, in the worldwide world, there’s nobody like him! Join the unforgettable Manolito as he takes on life in Madrid. And for the first time, this bestselling phenomenon from Spain is available in English.

  • Mazuzahn
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this, but I'm well above middle school age. I'd like to hear the opinions of youngsters of that age about this book.
  • ladushka
Manolito likes to be called Four-Eyes; in his school, anybody who's a little important has a nickname. His best friend is Big Ears - though they did get into a fight once because Manolito said he'd rather have Coke-bottle glasses than monkey-butt ears like Big Ears. And then there's the One-And-Only Susana, tougher and smarter than anybody in the school, even Ozzy the Bully. Until brilliant Paquito Medina shows up, in a beeline for the Nobel Prize according to Our Teach Miss Asuncion. Paquito is obviously from another planet, says Manolito, one where women are twins and babies are attached to their mothers by two umbilical cords - because Paquito has two bellybuttons!
A hilarious story about a crazy kid, his crazy grandfather ("Is insanity hereditary?" "Are you calling me crazy?") and a mad pack of schoolmates.
  • Hulore
A delight in Spanish and a good translation. It would be a shame for the English speaking world to miss this series.
  • Thomeena
Manolito Gafotas es un niño quizá anclado en la generación de los q ahora rondamos los 40, un niño inteligente y divertido de la clase media trabajadora española. No hay nada mas alegre que las aventuras diarias la banda de la escuela, la familia y la calle.., una mezcla de melancolía y satisfacción me produce por gozar un ambiente que quizá los nuevos tiempos han borrado para siempre y el gozo de comprobar que con la vida simple se es tan feliz! No se lo pierdan!
  • Domarivip
I hate to be the one lone voice criticizing a book, but this book completely falls flat for me, and my third-grade boy didn't like it either.

For me, the biggest problem is the slangy style of the book. It feels absolutely forced, and I have to wonder if it reads more smoothly and naturally in Spanish. In English, though, it borders on the ludicrous. No child actually speaks like this, and what's more, a lot of the slang feels old-fashioned. He says things like "broad" for woman, "blessed" for "darn," "good night!" as an exclamation of surprise, talks about "Kodak moments" and so on and so on. How many small children know what Kodak means? Or use any of those slang expressions. And on and on and on. I shuddered at the use of the term "brown-nosed" early in the book--is the translator aware of where that term came from and how vulgar it really is? Other things that felt inappropriate in a kids book included a comment about how his parents' bed is "the biggest deserted island I've ever seen in my life, and it's only a ... double bed for affectionate marriages." It just didn't seem necessary to the book, so why an indirect comment about his parents' sex life? Another slightly bizarre thing is a time when they say that the grandfather is "determined to die in 2009" because he "wants to die before the year 2010." This is jarring in a newly-published book. When is the book supposed to be taking place? I had assumed the present, but apparently not. And finally, he's kind of a little brat, which can be funny, I guess, but it's nice when there are some repercussions or something to help readers understand that he's not a role model.

Plus, I just didn't think it was funny. I guess I was hoping it would be something like "Le Petit Nicolas" which is a series with a similar concept from France, but that series made me laugh out loud with almost every story. This one, never. It was mildly cute as far as the story (when I could bring myself to ignore the irritating manner of speaking of the narrator), but not exactly hilarious. My third-grade boy was not impressed either, and after 3 chapters asked if he really needed to read the whole thing. He is an avid reader and the book was not too difficult; he just wasn't drawn into the story and didn't care to read the whole thing.
  • Trash Obsession
"Manolito Four-Eyes", Manolito Garcia Moreno, will captivate readers of all ages. A ten-year old "everyman", Manolito is the quintessential underdog - he is small in stature, wears Coke-bottle glasses, and is the target of Ozzy the Bully. Yet, "Manolito Four-Eyes" has spirit - and, his grandfather - on his side. Targeted at the 9 - 12 year-old audience, Elvira Lindo's book will also keep adults engaged and amused. I found myself laughing out loud as "Manolito Four-Eyes" described his life and adventures.

"Manolito Four-Eyes" is an excellent book for the pre-teen reader; it addresses many of the issues they confront on a daily basis. While his mother tells him not to be "different", "Manolito Four-Eyes" revels in his individuality and thinks his nickname - all the "important" kids have nicknames - is "cool". Manolito and his best friend "Big Ears" are inseparable until a girl, "The One and Only Susana", comes between them. Manolito deals with school, his little brother "The Bozo", and sharing a room with his "Grandpa Nicholas" as any ten-year old might. He must also overcome issues with the neighborhood Bully "Ozzy" and eventually finds the two have more in common than they originally imagined.

I particularly liked that Elvira Lindo created a character and situations that are appropriate for younger readers. When "Manolito Four-Eyes" courts the One-and-Only Susana, they act as one expects ten-year olds to act. They eat Cocoa Krispies, drink chocolate milk, and watch the Tasmanian Devil on television. Grandpa Nicholas is a positive factor in Manolito's life; the camaraderie between the two shows the powerful influence living in a multi-generational home can have on a child.

With one exception, language was inoffensive and entirely appropriate for younger readers. In that one instance, using the word "friggin" or "N.F.C" - no friggin' clue - multiple times with respect to a school exam and in the classroom setting seemed out of character for "Manolito Four-Eyes". Further, younger readers who have not been exposed to that particular form of the "f-word" may be curious about its meaning. In my opinion, the translator might have chosen to use another expression that was not a variation on a profanity.

I found "Manolito Four-Eyes" a delightful book. It had humor, appealing characters, and made some good points about friendship, behavior, and family. I definitely recommend Elvira Lindo's "Manolito Four-Eyes". I look forward to reading other books in this series.