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Download Science in Ancient Greece (Look What Came from) eBook

by Kathlyn Gay

Download Science in Ancient Greece (Look What Came from) eBook
ISBN:
1439524238
Author:
Kathlyn Gay
Category:
Geography & Cultures
Language:
English
EPUB book:
1728 kb
FB2 book:
1748 kb
DJVU:
1887 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
220


Discusses the theories of ancient Greek ts such as Hippocrates, Aristotle, and Pythagoras. Kathlyn Gay. + Follow. Similar authors to follow.

Discusses the theories of ancient Greek ts such as Hippocrates, Aristotle, and Pythagoras. Please try your request again later.

Science in Ancient Greece book. In recent years, Kathlyn Gay has collaborated with family members, sons Martin and Douglas Gay and daughter Karen Hamilton, on various books. Books by Kathlyn Gay.

Learn More at LibraryThing. Kathlyn Gay at LibraryThing.

Science in Ancient Greece (Science of the Past). by Kathlyn Gay. ISBN 9780613191258 (978-0-613-19125-8) Turtleback Books: A Division of Sanval, 1999. Learn More at LibraryThing.

Modern Greeks don't look like modern Greeks, there is a huge diversity .

Modern Greeks don't look like modern Greeks, there is a huge diversity throughout Greece, and you'll see that diversity even inside a random single village. Which in turn will look kind of different from the next village. Ancient Greece carried more or less the same Haplogroups as modern Greeks which means ancient Greeks looked like modern Greeks. Wouldn't your mention of more blondes coming in and mixing into the general population have had the opposite effect, and have resulted in the modern Greek look more vaguely Nordic?

The ancient Greeks and Romans were known to have white/olive skin with brown/black hair. The Greeks used to bleach their hair to look lighter, and the Roman women used to bleach their skin or put articial cremes (sorry forgot the name they used) to make their skin look whiter.

The ancient Greeks and Romans were known to have white/olive skin with brown/black hair. They had long heads and were naturally shorter than Nordics. The average height for a Roman was 5'6. The Romans and the Greeks used to imagine their Gods and Goddesses as blonde and blue eyed, as that was seen as a rare color in Ancient Greece and Rome. Of course thats not to say there werent any blondes.

Discusses the theories of ancient Greek ts such as Ptolemy, Pythagoras, Hippocrates, and Aristotle, and describes some of the scientific.

Ancient Greece Homes had shutters, were whitewashed, had a courtyard, had a few mats, a many stools, and a. .The city structure in ancient Mesopotamia look like a great wall surrounding many homes that look sort of like apartments made of brick.

Ancient Greece Homes had shutters, were whitewashed, had a courtyard, had a few mats, a many stools, and a men's room. What did Ancient Thebes Greece look like? What did Thebes look like? What does the ancient Greece trophies look like in pictures? they look like symbols. What did the ancient India homes look like? The homes in the Indus valley (ancient india) probably loked like bricks put togheter but sun dried bricks. So they looked like tan houses. What does a house look like in ancient Greece?

In classical antiquity, writers such as Herodotus, Plato, Xenophon, Athenaeus and many others explored aspects of homosexuality in Greece

In classical antiquity, writers such as Herodotus, Plato, Xenophon, Athenaeus and many others explored aspects of homosexuality in Greece. The most widespread and socially significant form of same-sex sexual relations in ancient Greece was between adult men and pubescent or adolescent boys, known as pederasty (marriages in Ancient Greece between men and women were also age structured, with men in their thirties commonly taking wives in their early teens)

This was the world of ancient Greece, a supposed gay paradise in which . We know very little about the lives of same-sex attracted women in Greece

This was the world of ancient Greece, a supposed gay paradise in which same-sex love flourished without discrimination. It was a powerful, captivating dream, one which scholars of ancient Greece have started to pull apart, revealing a culture in which homosexuality was much more regulated and controlled than previously thought. We know very little about the lives of same-sex attracted women in Greece. The Greeks become a little more disappointing, but also more real.

  • DrayLOVE
There are (at least) two editions of this book: the 1988 hardcover edition and the 1998 paperback edition. Parents should be aware that there are significant differences in the two editions.

The original hardcover edition contains much denser text with more advanced prose and a much greater depth of material covered. However, the older text is entirely in black and white, with few illustrations (although those that are included are relevant and helpful).

The newer edition has much larger print containing easier-to-read vocabulary and much less information overall. And annoyingly, there are no dates in this book -- instead of specifying that something happened in "450 B.C." as the 1988 edition does, this text vaguely reads "about 2,500 years ago." (I had to read this with a calculator next to me and then pencil in the approximate dates so that my children and I could have an idea when things were happening.)

The plus side of the newer edition is that its pages are glossy paper with very nice full-color photographs on nearly every page. Plus, some of the (simplified) information has been organized into sidebars, which does draw attention to it.

If you are reading this with younger children, the newer edition might be more interesting for them. But any student in middle or high school would greatly benefit from the better depth of coverage contained in the hardcover edition. (It's too bad that the original text couldn't simply have been augmented with the newer color photographs, without "dumbing it down," but I guess this is the trend in nearly all school textbooks.)
  • Oso
Interesting book.
  • Hatе&love
I used this to teach ancient history to 6th graders. This book helped my students understand how science developed throughout history, as well as how subjects are related. It is far better that children understand sooner, rather than later, that all subjects are related, i.e., mathematics, science, religion, politics, literature, history.... This book is also useful for sparking an interest in history in a child who is interested in science but thinks Ancient Greece or history is boring. Children always learn more when the subject matter is interesting to them.
  • Wnex
We do a thematic literature approach to homeschooling and I love it when I can find books that bring in science to our studies. We find this series especially helpful. It doesn't go into deep detail, only a general overview, but is a good starting point when studying Ancient Greece. I also like to include "Archimedes and the Door of Science," "Aristotle and Scientific Thought," and "Classical Kids" which includes a lot of Greek science projects.