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Download In the Line of Fire: Eight Women War Spies eBook

by George Sullivan

Download In the Line of Fire: Eight Women War Spies eBook
ISBN:
0606094644
Author:
George Sullivan
Category:
Geography & Cultures
Language:
English
Publisher:
Demco Media (March 1, 1996)
Pages:
118 pages
EPUB book:
1601 kb
FB2 book:
1300 kb
DJVU:
1690 kb
Other formats
mbr docx txt mobi
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
359


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Includes bibliographical references (pages 117-118). The incredible stories of eight women spies whose adventures were exciting, ingenious, and often tragic, for they sometimes paid with their lives

Includes bibliographical references (pages 117-118). The incredible stories of eight women spies whose adventures were exciting, ingenious, and often tragic, for they sometimes paid with their lives. Spy who saved George Washington - Rebel Rose - Confederate courier and agent - The spy who changed her color - The legendary Mata Hari - Family of spies - The cat - Code name Cynthia.

The stories of eight American women spies include the heroic tales of Lydia Darragh, who warned .

The stories of eight American women spies include the heroic tales of Lydia Darragh, who warned Washington of an imminent British attack, and Emma Edmonds, wh. .In many ways, especially in the past, it was easier for a woman to be a spy than a man. There was the strong social bias that women were the weaker sex, less intelligent, too emotional for the psychological rigors of spying and the chivalrous notion that men must protect women. Furthermore, since officers were male, there was the potential sexual component, namely that a man would reveal secrets to a woman to impress them so that sex would be his reward.

April 5, 2014 History. Eight Women War Spies. Published March 1996 by Scholastic. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. next from Katelin Hoffman. Are you sure you want to remove In the Line of Fire from your list? In the Line of Fire.

Spies proved to be the tipping point in the summer of 1778, helping Washington begin breaking the stalemate . Kilmeade and Yaeger have spun more than one story here.

Spies proved to be the tipping point in the summer of 1778, helping Washington begin breaking the stalemate with the British. "Kilmeade and Yaeger have spun more than one story here. This non-fiction book hovers dangerously close to the side of fiction" "Historians can refer with confidence to Alexander Rose’s book. Notes: 60 pages, documenting every quotation and inference.

In the Line of Fire: A Memoir is a book that was written by former President of Pakistan Pervez Musharraf and first published on September 25, 2006

In the Line of Fire: A Memoir is a book that was written by former President of Pakistan Pervez Musharraf and first published on September 25, 2006. The book contains a collection of Musharraf's memories and is being marketed as his official autobiography. The book consists topics regarding Musharraf's personal life to the international and national issues and his rise to power. He writes about his childhood, education and life.

Mason and Dixon's Line of Fire by Judith St. George (HC, DJ, 1991).

In the Line of Fire: Eight Women War Spies Sullivan, George Paperback Used - V. Mason and Dixon's Line of Fire by Judith St.

Historian Matthew Pinsker presents a quick rundown of women's involvement in the . Find out more about Rose O'Neal Greenhow and three other female informants who played a significant role in America’s bloodiest conflict. Known from a young age as Wild Rose, Rose O’Neal Greenhow ascended the ranks of Washington, . society as the wife of a wealthy and prominent doctor. Her charmed life took a tragic turn in the 1850s, when her husband and five of their eight children died.

The stories of eight American women spies include the heroic tales of Lydia Darragh, who warned Washington of an imminent British attack, and Emma Edmonds, who disguised herself as a male slave in a Confederate camp