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Download The Gift of the Crocodile: A Cinderella Story eBook

by Reynold Ruffins,Judy Sierra

Download The Gift of the Crocodile: A Cinderella Story eBook
ISBN:
0689821883
Author:
Reynold Ruffins,Judy Sierra
Category:
Geography & Cultures
Language:
English
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; 1st edition (November 1, 2000)
Pages:
40 pages
EPUB book:
1996 kb
FB2 book:
1282 kb
DJVU:
1828 kb
Other formats
mobi lit doc lrf
Rating:
4.9
Votes:
581


Judy Sierra (Author), Reynold Ruffins (Illustrator). Fans of the Cinderella story will enjoy this Indonesian version. Sierra's writing is clever and humorous, but also echoes the traditional narration style.

Judy Sierra (Author), Reynold Ruffins (Illustrator). The varying details in this story will keep readers fascinated. The author's note at the end of the book explains the different influences used in her story, including a short history of the Cinderella story itself. Ruffins' artwork is bold, mixing bright acrylic paints with miniature silhouettes.

I have read many books written by Judy Sierra and I was always intrigued . The Gift the Crocodile is a Folklore story that puts a twist on A Cinderella Story.

I have read many books written by Judy Sierra and I was always intrigued with her ability to retell stories that deal with folktales and myths (especially the brilliant children’s book The Gruesome Guide to World Monsters)! . Reynold Ruffins’ artwork is truly gorgeous to look at especially of the scenes where the characters are shown in a swamp and you can see the trees tangled up with each other and see how colorful the swamp looks like.

Ruffins entered the field of children's book illustration in 1969, and throughout the 1970s and early 1980s he frequently . The Gift of the Crocodile: A Cinderella Story (Simon & Schuster, 2000) - written by Judy Sierra. Marco's Run (Green Light Readers, 2001) - written by Wesley Cartier.

Ruffins entered the field of children's book illustration in 1969, and throughout the 1970s and early 1980s he frequently collaborated with writer Jane Sarnoff. In 1991, Ruffins teamed with Whoopi Goldberg and Herbie Hancock to produce "Koi and the Kola Nuts," a highly praised video for children which was part of Rabbit Ears Productions' We All Have Tales series Teaching.

Too bad they didn't know about Grandmother Crocodile. The Gift of the Crocodile, a tale from the Spice Islands in Indonesia, offers a colorful and dramatic twist on the universally adored Cinderella story. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, 1 нояб.

Free 2-day shipping The author's note at the end of the book explains the different influences . The Gift of the Crocodile" by Judy Sierra and Illustrated by Reynold Ruffin takes place on an island of Indonesia.

The author's note at the end of the book explains the different influences used in her story, including a short history of the Cinderella story itself. The illustrations vary between wide, two-page spread landscapes to intense close-ups of characters.

Illustrated by Reynold Ruffins. Judy Sierra is the author of many award-winning books for children including the bestsellers Antarctic Antics, illustrated by Jose Aruego and Ariane Dewey; Wild About Books, illustrated by Marc Brown; and The Secret Science Project that Almost Ate the School, illustrated by Stephen Gammell.

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The Gift of the Crocodile: A Cinderella Story (Simon & Schuster, 2000) - written by Judy Sierra.

Just better In 1991, Ruffins teamed with Whoopi Goldberg and Herbie Hancock to produce "Koi and the Kola Nuts," a highly praised video for children which was part of Rabbit Ears Productions' We All Have Tales series Teaching.

After the death of her mother, Damura invites misery by asking her father to marry a neighbor woman who has bribed her with the gift of a beautiful doll.

00 Title: The gift of the crocodile : a Cinderella story, by Judy Sierra ; illustrated by Reynold Ruffins

00 Title: The gift of the crocodile : a Cinderella story, by Judy Sierra ; illustrated by Reynold Ruffins. Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers, p2000, c2000 In this Indonesian version of the Cinderella story, a girl named Damura escapes her cruel stepmother and stepsister and marries a handsome prince with the help of Grandmother Crocodile.

In the Spice Islands, where clove and nutmeg trees grow, a girl named Damura lived long ago. Damura is a beautiful girl, as kind and lovely as the little green parrot that perches on the nutmeg tree. But Damura's stepmother and stepsister mistreat her. They force her to rise before dawn, carry out all the chores, and sleep on the floor. One day, while down by the river, Damura calls out to the creatures of the wild for help. Rising from the waters, an ancient crocodile answers the call. This unusual fairy godmother, aptly named Grandmother Crocodile, outfits Damura in a sarong of gold, with slippers to match, and sends her to the palace to dance for the prince. Once he sees her, the prince knows that she will be his bride. But the fairy tale isn't quite over. Damura's wicked stepmother and stepsister are so jealous that they push Damura into the river, where she is swallowed by a crocodile. Too bad they didn't know about Grandmother Crocodile.... The Gift of the Crocodile, a tale from the Spice Islands in Indonesia, offers a colorful and dramatic twist on the universally adored Cinderella story.
  • Burgas
I'm not too into the whole princess/Cinderella thing. However, my 5 yr. old daughter is... and for that genre, this is a great version. She first found this book at our local library, and fell in love with it. First of all, the story is written well, and the language is pleasurable to read. The pictures are beautifully illustrated with vibrant colors and descriptive imagery. The story and illustrations have an exotic island flair, which is a nice departure from the stereotypical disney-esque cookie-cutter pattern, although the story is basically a classic Cinderella tale, with a little more emphasis on the natural world. In it, the fairy godmother is an ancient crocodile who produces a sarong that sparkles and looks like the evening sky. Altogether, it's enjoyable even for this mom who generally avoids the princess/prince thing.
  • sobolica
What beautiful illustrations! It's amazing to me to find a classic folk tale from Halmahera published in such a beautiful format. I would love to see it translated into Bahasa Indonesia!
  • Xava
The book arrived in good time and was in great condition. I will be using this for a Fairy Tale Unit in my classroom.
  • Buge
My stoudents enjoyed this fairy tale very much!
  • Qag
My students liked this book and were intrigued but the differences from the traditional Cinderella story. They loved the illustrations as well.
  • Wishamac
This is an interesting take on Cinderella. You won't cry crocodile tears over this story. I'm always on the lookout for another rendition of Cinderella.
  • Qane
This version of the Cinderella fairytale comes from the Spice Islands. Damura's mother teaches her traditional dances and to respect the animals. When she dies, Damura is tricked into convincing her father to marry another woman in the village, who soon turns on Damura, treating her as a slave for herself and her daughter. When Damura is doing laundry at the river, she loses her old sarong, but Grandmother Crocodile gives her another made of silver. The stepsister tries to repeat Damura's success, but after spanking a baby crocodile and being short with Grandmother Crocodile, she is given a ragged sarong covered in leeches. When the prince holds a ball to choose a bride, the stepmother and stepsister leave Damura at home, stealing her silver sarong. However, Grandmother Crocodile once again gifts the girl with a beautiful sarong, made out of gold, and matching slippers.

Like other Cinderella stories, she loses a slipper at the ball, but the prince uses it to track Damura down. Unlike most other versions, Damura's story continues, as her stepmother and stepsister apologize, wishing to be friends. They take her on a boat ride, but then toss her overboard, where a crocodile eats her. When the prince tells Grandmother Crocodile of what happened, she gathers the other reptiles around her and forces the guilty croc to spit her out. Grandmother Crocodile brings Damura back to life and promises her and her children protection forever.

Fans of the Cinderella story will enjoy this Indonesian version. Sierra's writing is clever and humorous, but also echoes the traditional narration style. The varying details in this story will keep readers fascinated. The author's note at the end of the book explains the different influences used in her story, including a short history of the Cinderella story itself. Ruffins' artwork is bold, mixing bright acrylic paints with miniature silhouettes. The illustrations vary between wide, two-page spread landscapes to intense close-ups of characters. The trees, rivers, and figures flow and weave together and evoke the landscape of the story.
This Indonesian version of Cinderella hails from the Moluccas, or Spice Islands--the place to which Christopher Columbus was headed when he found the New World. In 1492 they were the only place in the world where cloves grew. The earliest written version of Cinderella is from China. As the author indicates in the afterward, no one knows where the story originated. But she speculates that Cinderella may have traveled West with the spices.
Damura was a child when her mother taught her to light a fire, cook, and to tend and harvest rice. But she still loved dolls when her mother died. The lorikeet and little green parrot outside in the nutmeg tree were not company enough for her. With a new doll, a neighboring widow bribed Damura into convincing her father to marry her. Her stepmother's two daughters were kind at first, but soon made Damura their servant. She cried at night that she had traded her happiness for a doll.
One day as she washed the family's clothes, she lost her sarong in the river. She called to the creatures of the wild for help, and a crocodile appeared. "Good morning Grandmother," she said to the crocodile.
The crocodile gave Damura her baby to care for, and returned with a silver sarong that sparkled like the night sky. She told Damura to take it and come to the river again if she ever needed anything.
Her stepsisters were naturally jealous of the sarong. But when they tried to entice the crocodile to help them, she saw through their façade. A year later, the village buzzed with excitement as the prince planned to hold a dance to choose his bride. Damura asked her stepmother if she might go, wearing her silver sarong. Of course her stepmother refused her.
The rest of this tale is very similar to that of Cinderella. But to find the unique ways in which it sparkles, you'll have to read this book. Alyssa A. Lappen