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Download Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel eBook

by Raul Colon,Patricia Storace

Download Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel eBook
ISBN:
0786807911
Author:
Raul Colon,Patricia Storace
Category:
Geography & Cultures
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jump At The Sun (June 19, 2007)
Pages:
48 pages
EPUB book:
1942 kb
FB2 book:
1980 kb
DJVU:
1929 kb
Other formats
lrf lit azw doc
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
770


Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel Hardcover – July 2, 2007.

Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel Hardcover – July 2, 2007. by. Patricia Storace (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. In this tropical retelling, a young fisherman's pregnant wife craves sugar cane.

Patricia Storace's lyrical and poignant retelling of the Rapunzel tale in a Caribbean setting is perfectly matched with Raúl Colón's lush illustrations. An unforgettable feast for the senses.

You live in a tower without a stair,Sugar Cane, Sugar Cane, let down your hair This is a fine telling of the Rapunzel story, set in the Carribean. Well told and well illustrated. My daughter (10) loves this book.

You live in a tower without a stair,Sugar Cane, Sugar Cane, let down your hair. This is a fine telling of the Rapunzel story, set in the Carribean.

Information about the book, Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel: the Children’s, Hardcover, by Patricia Storace (Jump At The Sun, Jun 19, 2007) . Tell us what do you think about Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel. Please consider supporting us by disabling your ad blocker.

by. Patricia Storace. Folklore - Caribbean Area. Jump at the Sun/Hyperion Books for Children. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; ctlibrary; china; americana.

Then one night, someone does hear her song, but could this young man with a gift for music break the spell of Madam Fate and help Sugar Cane set herself free? Patricia Storace’s lyrical and poignant retelling of the Rapunzel tale in a Caribbean setting is perfectly matched with Raúl Colón’s lush illustrations.

The Caribbean - Sugar Island Slavery in the Age of Enlightenment, the Political Economy of the Caribbean . To prepare ñeque, panela (sugar cane juices) is dissolved in water until a density of one Baume degree is reached.

The Caribbean - Sugar Island Slavery in the Age of Enlightenment, the Political Economy of the Caribbean World. By StinchcombeArthur . .Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995. This solution is fermented approximately for seven days obtaining a must. After that, the must is distilled obtaining the alcoholic beverage as distillate.

Storace's glimmering prose and Colón's luminous artwork are a perfect combination and complement to the story, and a dreamlike . A Caribbean Rapunzel. Get weekly book recommendations

Storace's glimmering prose and Colón's luminous artwork are a perfect combination and complement to the story, and a dreamlike tribute to the beauty of the sea. (Fiction. by Patricia Storace & illustrated by Raúl Colón.

Fairy Tales in Different Cultures: Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel. Children's Books About Anger Management for Toddlers to Teens. African American Literature American Children American Art Children Books Kid Books Books To Read Rapunzel Traditional Literature Black Books. Sugar Cane: A Caribbean Rapunzel by Patricia Storace, Raul Colon via- Classroom Gallery. A lovely version of Rapunzel with beautiful pictures. What others are saying. Winter solstice books for kids serve as a gentle reminder of the cyclical nature of the changing seasons for children of all ages and religious backgrounds.

Sugar was the main crop produced on plantations throughout the Caribbean in the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Most islands were covered with sugar cane fields, and mills for refining it. The main source of labor, until the abolition of chattel slavery, was enslaved Africans. After the abolition of slavery, indentured laborers from India, China, and Java migrated to the Caribbean to mostly work on the sugar plantations. These plantations produced 80 to 90 percent of the sugar consumed in Western Europe.

“You live in a tower without a stair,Sugar Cane, Sugar Cane, let down your hair.”Stolen away from her parents on her first birthday by island sorceress Madam Fate, beautiful Sugar Cane grows up in a tower overlooking the sea. With only a pet green monkey named Callaloo for company, Sugar Cane is lonely—her only consolation is her love of music. Often she stands at her window and sings, imagining that the echo of her voiceis someone answering her. Then one night, someone does hear her song, but could this young man with a gift for music break the spell of Madam Fate and help Sugar Cane set herself free? Patricia Storace’s lyrical and poignant retelling of the Rapunzel tale in a Caribbean setting is perfectly matched with Raúl Colón’s lush illustrations. An unforgettable feast for the senses.
  • Mr.Savik
This is a wonderful book. It has beautiful, rich illustrations, and it has wonderfully poetic text. The story is much more fleshed out than many versions of Rapunzel - and I'm not ashamed to admit how happy I am to have a princess story that avoids all that long blond hair. I'm tired of my two biracial nieces complaining about their hair because it's "not princess hair". Really, it breaks my heart to hear it.

I firmly recommend this to any child's library. One major caveat though - this is a long book. A LONG one. And it's hard to cut out the text without really selling the story short. It takes easily 25 minutes to read on its own - and that's if you rush and don't spend any time to really enjoy and appreciate the art or to savor the words you just read.

Don't try this on any child too young to have any real attention span (there's a reason this book is listed as appropriate for children over the age of 4) and don't try this when you don't have the time. You'll just cheat yourself. Set aside some real time for this one - it's worth it.
  • Oveley
I ordered this on the strength of a review of recent renderings of the Rapunzel myth in The New York Review of Books ("The Girl in the Tower" by Alison Lurie, May 1, 2008), which also explored why this story has such staying power. The artwork is beautiful and the story is well told, with a very scary sorceress as the villain. This is a far cry from the usual wan blond waiting for help in the tower.
  • Maman
The author used names of Caribbean foods as names of people.
Sugar cane is a well known plant in the Caribbean which produces sugar .
The author named the girl Sugar Cane, and her pet monkey Callaloo which is a food dish in the Caribbean.
Very interesting reading.
  • Dusar
Since we live in the Caribbean, I purchased this as an extra summer reading book for my 8 year old daughter and 10 year old niece. We received the book yesterday, I read it at bedtime and they LOVED it. The girls did not want me to stop reading. To test their attention/comprehension; I would pause after each page and ask questions: they could repeat the story word-for-word!

I also enjoyed the incorporation of Caribbean lifestyle and culture in the story: carnival customs, local fruits and daily living. The illustrations are beautiful! I love the art work.

We need more books like this!
  • Kelenn
I was searching for books for my daugher that showed Caribbean culture and I was so excited to find this book. THe story is full of culture of the islands and its a great find. The seller was also amazing as I had a small shipping issue and they were very accomodating to help me resolve.
  • Dagdage
Wonderful story with beautiful illustrations! I highly recommend this book for girls and boys a like. It's a fantastic opportunity to teach children about different cultures, and celebrate beauty in all it's colors.
  • Thetalen
I brought this book for my niece I read it loved it and neicey may have to read it at my house. I could actually feel the characters I am having a hard time giving it up
Beautifully written--magical realism. Illustrations are gorgeous.