almediah.fr
» » From Where I Sit: Making My Way With Cerebral Palsy

Download From Where I Sit: Making My Way With Cerebral Palsy eBook

by Shelley Nixon

Download From Where I Sit: Making My Way With Cerebral Palsy eBook
ISBN:
059039584X
Author:
Shelley Nixon
Category:
Growing Up & Facts of Life
Language:
English
Publisher:
Scholastic Paperbacks (December 1, 1999)
Pages:
136 pages
EPUB book:
1530 kb
FB2 book:
1642 kb
DJVU:
1786 kb
Other formats
lit rtf docx doc
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
397


From Where I Sit book. See a Problem? We’d love your help.

From Where I Sit book.

Shelley Nixon was born with Cerebral Palsy. Many readers will expect an informative look at CP, along with an emotional description of dealing with a disability. Instead, we get a straightforward look at a young woman looking back on her childhood and adolescence. She may not be as introspective in "From Where I Sit" as you might like, but insight can be found in her poetry, particularly "A Tree For M. Shelley Nixon may one day write a book about her disability, but first, she chose to write about herself. That alone is a strong statement about embracing one's own abilities.

com's Shelley Nixon Author Page. From Where I Sit: Making My Way With Cerebral Palsy Dec 01, 1999. Mass Market Paperback.

Every day, twenty-one-year-old Shelley Nixon faces a new obstacle. The result of complications that robbed Shelley's brain of oxygen when she was born, the cerebral palsy affects her muscles and her speech

Every day, twenty-one-year-old Shelley Nixon faces a new obstacle. Whether it's getting dressed or just eating breakfast, Shelley is often a prisoner of a debil. The result of complications that robbed Shelley's brain of oxygen when she was born, the cerebral palsy affects her muscles and her speech. As Shelley grew older, her parents began to notice that she did not develop at the pace of other children. And at about seven years old, Shelley, herself, became self-conscious of her differences. lt;/p

Another great education story is Angela Oyama. Oyama has spastic Cerebral Palsy, but never let that get in the way of achieving her academic dreams.

There are many ups and downs in life and we all could use some inspiration to keep us headed in the right direction. Since we love sharing good stories, we found 10 inspiring stories about Cerebral Palsy. Another great education story is Angela Oyama.

Books with the subject: Cerebral Palsy. From where I sit. Shelley Nixon. People with disabilities, Cerebral palsy.

The book is recommended for ages 10 and up and for grades 5-8. The story was written in first person, featuring Melody Brooks, a girl with cerebral . Melody Brooks is an eleven-year-old girl who was born with cerebral palsy

The book is recommended for ages 10 and up and for grades 5-8. The story was written in first person, featuring Melody Brooks, a girl with cerebral palsy. Melody Brooks is an eleven-year-old girl who was born with cerebral palsy. As a result, Melody has to fight to get her wishes.

Shelley Nixon loves to laugh, to write stories and poetry, and to challenge herself

Mentally retarded Charlie Gordon participates in an experiment which turns him into a genius but only Frankenstein Marry Shelley From Where I sit, Making my way with Cerebral Palsy Shelley Nixon Ghosts of mercy Manor, The Betty Ren Wright Gift of Magi Glory of a Unicorn, A O’ Henry Bruce Coville Gold Bug and other Tales Edgar Allan Poe Gold Nugget Trip Candri. Shelley Nixon loves to laugh, to write stories and poetry, and to challenge herself. In this heartfelt autobiography, she tells readers how she does all this while confined to a wheelchair and living with all the other challenges of cerebral palsy.

This autobiographical account of a young woman explores how it feels to live with cerebral palsy while struggling to have a full life despite the challenges facing her every day. Original.
  • ACOS
Shelley's story is emotional without being maudlin, funny without being silly, and serious without being dry. What you get from this book is a picture of a unique person who has a bunch of characteristics, including, but not only, Cerebral Palsy. I read it to try to understand what my daughter will go through as she grows up with Cerebral Palsy. Shelley is a strong and talented woman and the book reflects that. I hope my daughter grows up as well!
  • lolike
Great read! The suspense is unbearable!
  • artman
I had the privilege of knowing Shelley and had also gone to school with her. Like most kids, I didn't fully understand her CP because it wasn't talked about or discussed in school. That was the biggest mistake the school made because I didn't find out until now that hers wasn't anything having to do with a mental disability, only a physical one. I can't believe it took me this long to come to understand Shelley wholly as a person. This book showed me what a brave and courageous mother she has who had pushed for her daughter in ways that only mothers can. This book also solidified my opinion of the health care system as it still is the same way today - not giving any information out and making patients be 150% proactive when the doctors don't give the help or info you need. It's a health care system that needs a serious overhaul for this reason. This book showed me what a loving family Shelley has - which I already knew, but never to the extent that I have found out. Since her CP was never brought up in school, and we were never required to take a class that explained it (I think health class briefly glossed over it), most of us didn't know what Shelley could and could not do. I, like many, believed that she was limited in everything - not knowing the real God's honest truth. This provided that horrible buffer, this not knowing, and made it harder for Shelley to navigate the social landscape of school. Knowledge is power and if only we, her classmates, knew, it would have made life easier on her as well as us! It's terrible to think of how much time went by before I could realize this gem of information. I loved her stories of her family and her humor. This was a very quick read and only because I am fascinated by this girl's strength. I would love to see this book as mandatory reading in schools. Kids need to understand and embrace differences - not just the cultural ones (which are stressed in schools) but other kinds of cultures as well (deaf, blind, gay & lesbian, developmental disabilities). I am so glad Shelley did so well with this book and is doing so well in life. I hope that she continues to write and lets us know how life has been since she turned 21!
  • Maveri
Shelley Nixon was born with Cerebral Palsy. Many readers will expect an informative look at CP, along with an emotional description of dealing with a disability.
Instead, we get a straightforward look at a young woman looking back on her childhood and adolescence. Shelley's CP is, of course, the catalyst for a lot of her life's events, but she refuses to devote her autobiography to her disability. Instead, she writes, with funny and honest prose, about childhood, friendships, family, crushes, and art - all things important to her. She doesn't shy away from descriptions about her physical limitations and numerous surgeries (and the emotional struggles of dealing with her disability), but she refuses to be defined by Cerebral Palsy, in both her book and her life. She may not be as introspective in "From Where I Sit" as you might like, but insight can be found in her poetry, particularly "A Tree For Me."
Shelley Nixon may one day write a book about her disability, but first, she chose to write about herself. That alone is a strong statement about embracing one's own abilities.
  • Vijora
As a woman with Cerebral Palsy myself, I was very interested in this book. I found it to be well-written, clear, and honest. It demonstrates maturity, and is a good treatment of many facets of life with a disability. In a previous review on this page, however, it was mistakenly assumed that Cerebral Palsy is a disease. Although this is more than understandable, I would like to point out that it is, rather, a condition caused by a lack of oxygen to the brain before, during, or after birth. Diseases are generally progressive, and many can be fatal. Although the mobility level of a child with CP often decreases with maturity (due to growth) CP is neither progressive nor fatal, and a full understanding of both the book and the disability is greatly helped by the knowledge of this.
  • Burirus
I am priviledged to know Shelley and to work with her in a volunteer theater group to which we both belong. Shelley is one of the most uplifting, positive people I have ever met. She meets her disability and its challenges without hesitation every day. Shelley's poetry is often featured in the performances that the group does, and her writings are always greeted enthusiastically by the audience. The poetry in this book is honest, forthright and does not gloss over the hardships of being disabled. Instead, Shelley's book and her life offer other people a view of someone who deals realistically with CP every day, and does not let the disability hold her back from living her life fully.
  • Marige
Everyone should read this autobiography by Shelly Nixon; it is that gripping and insightful! I don't care how old or young you are, your life will be truly enriched by this woman's point of view. I was highly impressed by the depth of self-understanding she has mastered expressing in print. Shelly's writing is crafted with a acute skill of self-perception, making for a valuably sage autobiography. Shelly's open and personal 'voice' reveals and articulates aspects of human life conditions (specifically her unique human experience) with entertaining personal anecdotes which she synthesizes to provide a clear view of life from where she sits. Shelly's approach is both informing and appropriate to the uplifting message she has to communicate.