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by Margaret Peterson Haddix

Download Leaving Fishers eBook
ISBN:
1442443146
Author:
Margaret Peterson Haddix
Category:
Growing Up & Facts of Life
Language:
English
Publisher:
Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (April 3, 2012)
Pages:
272 pages
EPUB book:
1899 kb
FB2 book:
1523 kb
DJVU:
1410 kb
Other formats
mobi lit rtf doc
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
560


Leaving fishers, written by Margaret Peterson Haddix. p. cm. Summary: After joining her new friends in the religious group called. Fishers of Men, Dorry finds herself immersed in a cult from which. she must struggle to extricate herself. ISBN-10: 0-689-81125-X (h.

Leaving fishers, written by Margaret Peterson Haddix.

Margaret Peterson Haddix (born April 9, 1964) is an American writer known best for the two children's series, Shadow Children (1998–2006) and The Missing (2008-2015). She also wrote the tenth volume in The 39 Clues, published by Scholastic. Haddix grew up on a farm about halfway between two small towns: Washington Court House, Ohio, and Sabina, Ohio. Her family was predominantly farmers and she grew up in a family of voracious readers.

Leaving Fishers - Margaret Peterson Haddix. Seven others went, falling and being caught in turn. Leaving fishers, written by Margaret Peterson Haddix. Then Pastor Jim called Dorry’s name.

It exposes the darkness that exists when people take something pure and twist it for their own evil purposes.

Overall, Leaving Fishers is a rare, well-written, extremely important take on cults. It exposes the darkness that exists when people take something pure and twist it for their own evil purposes.

Margaret Peterson Haddix. BEFORE EVERYONE BEGAN heading for be. rushing her teeth in the communal bathroom, Dorry whispered with some of the other girls about Moira’s conversion. It was like a movie, one of the others, Janelle, said, spitting out a mouthful of toothpaste. Except she wasn’t acting. Have any of you ever felt that close to God?. Everyone shook their heads. I have, Angela said. And if Dorry had envied Angela before because she was rich and pretty and good friends with Brad, she wondered now if maybe there wasn’t.

Leaving Fishers book. Dorry is unbearably lonely at her new high school until she meets.

Dorry is unbearably lonely at her new high school until she meets Angela and her circle of friends. She soon discovers they all belong to a religious group, the Fishers of Men. Margaret Peterson Haddix. Sukie is worried - her parents are acting strange

Margaret Peterson Haddix. In Under Their Skin, twins Nick and Eryn successfully met their new stepsiblings, Ava and Jackson. Sukie is worried - her parents are acting strange. When she runs in the house, her dad asks, "If all your friends jumped off a bridge, would you jump off a bridge too?"

Margaret Peterson Haddix grew up on a farm near Washington Court House, Ohio. English/creative writing and history.

Margaret Peterson Haddix grew up on a farm near Washington Court House, Ohio.

This book is part of a larger series by a variety of authors. Young Adult/Middle Grade Standalone Books. The House on the Gulf. Takeoffs and Landings. The Summer of Broken Things. The Always War. Claim to Fame. Don’t You Dare Read This, Mrs. Dunphrey.

Now with a new trim size and a new line look, “a chilling portrait of an insecure teenager gradually relinquishing her autonomy to a religious cult” (Kirkus Reviews) from New York Times bestselling author Margaret Peterson Haddix.Dorry is unbearably lonely at her new high school until she meets Angela and her circle of friends. She soon discovers they all belong to a religious group, the Fishers of Men. At first, as Dorry becomes involved with the Fishers, she is eager to fit in and flattered by her new friends’ attention. But the Fishers make harsh demands of their members, and Dorry must make greater and greater sacrifices. In demonstrating her devotion, Dorry finds herself compromising her grades, her job, and even her family's love. How much is too much? And where will the cult’s demands end?
  • Kamick
This is a terrific YA novel about a lonely young high school girl, Dorry, who's just had to move to a new city and high school, and whose insecurity, low self-esteem and loneliness is exploited by an authoritarian religious cult, The Fishers, that has spread to her school. It is a chilling, riveting, realistic, acute, age-appropriate and psychologically real and sympathetic and gentle story of this youngster's thoughts and feelings, loneliness and doubts and self-hatred and recovery as she gets manipulated into the group until events in the story lead her to the self-respect of leaving it.

You can read about the book from other reviews; I just want to correct a few misunderstandings in the very few negative reviews.

The novel is not anti-Christian; it is anti-cult, as we all are, and pro-Christian, pro-religion, for personal dignity and seeking. The story makes perfectly clear that this cult believes that it's the only true church, that any Christian church (including evangelical) that isn't run by "Pastor Jim" is evil and Godless and unbelieving, and that new cultists need to be "re-baptized" and never associate with even Christian parents and siblings and family unless they serve "Pastor Jim."

Again SPOILERS: After leaving, Dorry says that "I still believe in God. Just not the sick and twisted version Fishers gave me." (259) And when a former "Fisher" and now a skeptical friend tells Dorry that "Religion's evil," Dorry's reply is: "No. Fisher's was. Religion isn't." And she sums it up: "When I left Fishers, I didn't leave God. I left because of God." (P. 253).

It's terrific YA literature, not at all heavy-handed, and the gripping storyline itself carries with it a fascinating and clear-minded innoculation against the lure of authoritarian cults.
  • zmejka
This book was one of my favorites by Margaret Peterson Haddix . She is on of my all time favorite authors . The thing I didn't really like about it was the ending because she didn't say anything about about how fishers is now that everyone knows there secret and how Dorry`s life is without Fishers and how lara is. There are A LOT of typo errors like instead of I they would put 1. U can still understand what they say though . Great read though !!
  • Ttyr
Como nuevo
  • Zbr
Great book for teens. Leads to great discussions.
  • Kale
I purchased this book on Black Friday from a local bookstore because I thought it sounded interesting. As a Christian, I was a little concerned with the back cover - "Fishers of Men" sounded like a Bible reference, so I was worried this book was going to paint my faith as a cult. As I read the first chapter, not only did I not find the writing very good, it also seemed my fears would come true. I kept reading, though, and discovered two things: 1) once you get past some awkwardness in the second chapter, the writing really picks up and is quite good, and 2) once you hit p. 86, it quickly becomes clear this is not a legit Christian organization, but something veeery messed up.

Up until p. 86, the Fishers seemed nice, a little pushy, some weirdness, and it was obvious the one girl told an elaborate lie to Dorry, but overall they seemed to embody the true attitude of Christ. However, all hell breaks loose as soon as Dorry becomes an official member. This group uses principles of true Christianity to lure people in, traps them into joining, then switches to fear tactics and hypocrisy to keep their victims, er, new members in the group. So if anyone who's religious had their doubts about the message this book sends, I can assure you it ultimately sends the right one.

The Fishers of Men actually put me in mind of some experiences I've had in the past with people who profess Christ but twist things, ex: questioning the salvation of others or asking for crazy large super weird amounts of money on TV, claiming an angel gave them this exact number. I think if you're newer to your faith, you may want to hold off on reading this book as it can be hard to discern what is legit Christianity and what the Fishers are twisting, and you can start to worry their fear tactics are correct. I've been saved for many years and I still had a couple of moments where I had to remind myself that so much of what they were instilling into Dorry was wrong, or worse, was taken from Scripture but was terribly twisted. Mostly, however, the messed up moments in this book jumped right off the page at me as being wrong.

As for the writing itself, once you get into the book, it grabs you and you can't stop reading. As I got closer and closer to the end, I felt legitimately nervous and maybe even a little sick because of the mess Dorry's life had become and how much she had been messed up both mentally and spiritually by this cult. (Also, I wanted to throttle Angela sooo badly, as I'm guessing anyone who reads this book the whole way through does.) By the end of the book, Dorry is learning to discern true relationship with God from the practices of this cult. I really liked what she had going for her by the end, though there really isn't a good closing paragraph or sentence or anything to let us know the story is over.

Overall, Leaving Fishers is a rare, well-written, extremely important take on cults. It exposes the darkness that exists when people take something pure and twist it for their own evil purposes.