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Download Let's Talk About Race eBook

by Karen Barbour,Julius Lester

Download Let's Talk About Race eBook
ISBN:
0060285966
Author:
Karen Barbour,Julius Lester
Category:
Growing Up & Facts of Life
Language:
English
Publisher:
Amistad; 1st edition (January 4, 2005)
Pages:
32 pages
EPUB book:
1414 kb
FB2 book:
1534 kb
DJVU:
1714 kb
Other formats
docx mbr mobi doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
107


Julius Lester is the author of the Newbery Honor Book To Be a Slave, the Caldecott Honor Book John Henry, the National Book Award finalist The Long Journey Home: Stories from Black History, and the Coretta Scott King Award winner Day of Tears. He is also a National Book Critics Circle nominee and a recipient of the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award. His most recent picture book, Let's Talk About Race, was named to the New York Public Library's "One Hundred Titles for Reading and Sharing.

His most recent picture book, Let's Talk About Race, was named to the New York Public Library's "One Hundred . Karen Barbour has illustrated many books for children, including You Were Loved Before You Were Born; Fire!

His most recent picture book, Let's Talk About Race, was named to the New York Public Library's "One Hundred Titles for Reading and Sharing. In addition to his critically acclaimed writing career, Mr. Lester has distinguished himself as a civil rights activist, musician, photographer, radio talk-show host, and professor. For thirty-two years he taught at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. He lives in western Massachusetts. Karen Barbour has illustrated many books for children, including You Were Loved Before You Were Born; Fire! Fire! Hurry!

His most recent picture book, Let's Talk About Race, was named to the New York Public Library's "One Hundred . Karen Barbour has illustrated many books for children, including You Were Loved Before You Were Born; Fire! Fire! Hurry!

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Let's Talk about Race book

Let's Talk about Race book. So are you. So is everyone  . Karen Barbour's dramatic, vibrant paintings speak to the heart of Lester's unique vision, truly a celebration of all of u. .Former University of Massachusetts professor Julius Lester presents a beautifully illustrated book about our lives and the stories we tell. Just as I am a story and you are a story and countries tell stories about themselves, race is a story, too. Whether you're black like me or Asian, Hispanic or white, each race has a story about itself.

Julius Bernard Lester (January 27, 1939 – January 18, 2018) was an American writer of books for children and adults . Let's Talk About Race, illus. Karen Barbour (2005). On Writing for Children and Other People (2005). Day of Tears: A Novel in Dialogue (2005).

Julius Bernard Lester (January 27, 1939 – January 18, 2018) was an American writer of books for children and adults and an academic who taught for 32 years (1971–2003) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst  .

Let's Talk About Race. illustrated by Karen Barbour. Child Magazine Best Book. This wonderful book should be a first choice for all collections and is strongly recommended as a springboard for discussions about differences. A strong choice for sharing at home or in the classroom.

ca, Canada's largest bookstore. Karen Barbour's dramatic, vibrant paintings speak to the heart of Lester's unique vision, truly a celebration of all of us. "This stunning picture book introduces race as just one of many chapters in a person's story" (School Library Journal). Lester's poignant picture book helps children learn, grow, discuss, and begin to create a future that resolves differences" (Children's Literature). Julius Lester said: "I write because our lives are stories. Julius Lester says, "I write because our lives are stories. If enough of those stories are told, then perhaps we will begin to see that our lives are the same story. The differences are merely in the details. Hardcover, 32 pages. Published on January 4, 2005 by Amistad.

I am a story.So are you. So is everyone.

Julius Lester says, "I write because our lives are stories. If enough of those stories are told, then perhaps we will begin to see that our lives are the same story. The differences are merely in the details." Now Mr. Lester shares his own story as he explores what makes each of us special. Karen Barbour's dramatic, vibrant paintings speak to the heart of Lester's unique vision, truly a celebration of all of us.

  • Ariseym
I think the age for the intended audience is way off. I'm not sure if the publishing company, the author, or Amazon specifies the age range but this book seems suited for older children or children that have already had to deal with racism. I'm glad I read this book before reading it to my kids, ages 5 and 7.

Also, the author throwing in unrelated facts, like "I had a brother who was nine years older than me but he is dead" seems odd to me and would likely initiate more questions and such.

I would urge parents to read the book first to see that it's appropriate for your child(ren).
  • Goldendragon
Love this book, great illustrations, gave it a read with my daughter, who's nearly six and it made me a little uncomfortable, mostly because she lives in one of the most diverse areas in the nation (silicon valley, CA) and she doesnt really see borders between people...I kind of felt like this book might make her see that too early in a sense and make her a little more conscious of race, and she doesn't feel that way now. Hopefully that makes sense; I don't know if it will read well as a review...just my two cents. I just dont think kids under 6 or even 7 will really get it, ESP. If they're used to seeing a great variety of ethnicities on a day-to-day basis and it's never really pointed out...she doesn't care who she plays with, be it black, white, Chinese, Korean, east indian, etc., she just never thinks about skin color, and neither do I. Also, there's a couple of lines I kinda glossed over, like when the author states he has asthma and his brother's dead...although interesting, I found it too serious to relay that to my daughter.

In truth, as an artist, I just thought the illustrations were AMAZING & wanted this book more for that alone.

I'm Japanese/white and have many friends of various racial backgrounds.
  • Mavegelv
Beautiful art but not at all what I expected. I wanted an elementary-level explanation about how the cultural and social implications of race can be positive and yet also about the complicated history of racial oppression. This book implies that noticing racial differences is negative and seems to advocate a color blind ideology. Now I have to try to find a book that talks about what it means to be a racial minority in Western civilization in a kid-friendly way.
  • invincible
I love the illustrations in this book, but sadly it teaches color blindness which is not an effective way to deal with race. We are not all treated equally. Systemic racism exists regardless of whether we pretend to be color blind or not. I will keep this book to use as a starter for better conversations.
  • Hrguig
i cannot recommend this book. there are beautiful pictures, but the message is totally colorblind and does not address actual racism (race prejudice + power) no, we can't just all take off our skin and be the same.
  • Rleyistr
Book preaches a colorblind ideology. Does not teach about race. Do not purchase.
  • Winawel
I love the author but kind of feel like this is a last generation book. I hope we've won this level of the conversation by now.
I love the illustrations and the prose is beautiful but this book does not in any way, shape, or form, mention the racism that has been and is prevalent in America. Any book that discusses race and doesn't mention the reality of racism needs an update.