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Download The Way Things Never Were: The Truth About the Good Old Days eBook

by Norman H Finkelstein

Download The Way Things Never Were: The Truth About the Good Old Days eBook
ISBN:
0689814127
Author:
Norman H Finkelstein
Category:
History
Language:
English
Publisher:
Atheneum; 1st edition (July 1, 1999)
Pages:
112 pages
EPUB book:
1639 kb
FB2 book:
1192 kb
DJVU:
1730 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
653


Fun book that tells the truth about the "good old days" of the 50s and 60s. The environment was worse, nuclear fallout from . Norman H. Finkelstein is the author of eighteen nonfiction books, mainly for young readers.

Fun book that tells the truth about the "good old days" of the 50s and 60s. The environment was worse, nuclear fallout from the testing was in our food, divorce rate was lower but there were a lot of unhappy women, jobs for women and minorities were limited. He recently retired as a school librarian for the Brookline (Massachusetts) Public Schools but continues into his 32nd year of teaching history in the Prozdor Department of Hebrew College.

Norman H. Finkelstein, a teacher and former school librarian is the author of thirteen non-fiction books for young readers

Norman H. Finkelstein, a teacher and former school librarian is the author of thirteen non-fiction books for young readers. He is the recipient of two National Jewish Book Awards and the Golden Kite Honor Book Award for Non-Fiction. He lives in Framingham, Massachusetts. This book came out during the mid-1990s when Republican Party demagogues like Rush Limbaugh used an appeal to return to the mythic, Golden Age Thinking-based Good Old Days portrayed on Leave It To Beaver to appeal to voters who were in thrall to this largely mythical time. As one of a number of books published during that era on that subject, it ranks only midway.

The Truth About the "Good Old Days" .

It seems like kids are always hearing stories about America in the good old days

It seems like kids are always hearing stories about America in the good old days. Finkelstein does a tremendous job at showing that things in the past were not necessarily better than now. My own grandmother talks about how much better life was growing up for her. She doesn't seem to remember that she has lived through 2 world wars, the depression and countless other tragedies. A must read for young and old alike.

This is Norman H. Finkelstein's eleventh nonfiction book for young readers. Like all parents," Finkelstein says, "I enjoyed telling my children how much better life was when I was their age. The idea for The Way Things Never Were emerged when they began challenging my heroic tales of walking fifteen miles to school in waist-deep snow. Finkelstein is a school librarian for the Brookline, Massachusetts, public school system and a part-time instructor at Hebrew College.

Good news - You can still get free 2-day shipping, free pickup, & more. It seems like kids are always hearing stories about America in the "good old days. Try another ZIP code. But, in fact, the 1950s and 1960s were not as carefree as they sometimes seem. Through fascinating stories, advertisements, facts and photographs, Norman H. Finkelstein invites people of all generations to decide for themselves.

The Way Things Never Were: The Truth About the Good Old Days. Norman Henry Finkelstein was born on November 10, 1941, in Chelsea, Massachusetts, United States, to Sydney and Mollie (Fox) Finkelstein. B01K3JDEGY/ref sr 1 1?keywords Norman+H. Finkelstein%2C+The+Way+Things+Never+Were%3A+The+Truth+about+the+Good+Old+Days&qid 1561625676&s gateway&sr 8-1.

Compares how life was in the 1950s and 1960s to how things are now and points out that the good old days were probably not as good as people remembered. Not terribly well-written-reads like a listing of events. But it’s interesting to see how far society has come. Finkelstein believes that kids need to be disabused of the view, pushed on them by baby-boomer parents, that the 1950's and 60's were a golden time. His goal is to assure children that the reverse is true; that like a Florida condo village, the America of the 1990's offers a splendid five-star way of life against which the postwar decades look like a shabby tract-house development.

Good old days is a cliché in popular culture. Finkelstein, Norman H. (1999). The Way Things Never Were: The Truth About the "Good Old Days" (1st e. It refers to an era considered by the speaker to be better than the current era. It is a form of nostalgic romanticisation.

Presents a true account of how life really was in America during the 1950s and 1960s by exploring the issues, struggles, fears, and quality of life of that era through stories, documented information, and photos.
  • Visonima
A quick, easy read comparing the good-old days with today. It traces how things have evolved technologically. We have better cars, tv's, medicines, computers, phones, etc. And we have more life style choices now. The basic premise seems to be that we are better off now because we have better things.There doesn't seem to be any thought given for a basic, simpler life back then.
Another similar title, 'The Way We Never Were', is much more of a sociology textbook on the same subject, now vs. then.
  • interactive man
This book is thin on content and original research. Mainly just the authors opinion.
  • Gagas
This book came out during the mid-1990s when Republican Party demagogues like Rush Limbaugh used an appeal to return to the mythic, Golden Age Thinking-based Good Old Days portrayed on Leave It To Beaver to appeal to voters who were in thrall to this largely mythical time. As one of a number of books published during that era on that subject, it ranks only midway. Designed as a children's book, it become more of a "Gee Whiz, Look at All the Cool Stuff" themed book, not unlike the original General Electric House of the Future ride in the original Disneyland.

It contains a small number of relatively harmless factual errors [For example, Page 36 states that "Scientists were able to prevent the escape of radioactive gasses into the atmosphere" in the case of Three Mile Island, when, in fact, the NRC's 1980 Rogovin Report on the incident stated that "During the course of the accident, approximately 2.5 million curies of radioactive noble gases and 15 curies of radioiodines were released."], but is otherwise the obvious child of its author, a professional librarian.

Being rather a statistics-laden book, it falls rather short of discussing the thematic backdrop to this fascinating, scrappy era. If you can get over the withering references to comically flawed Socialist and Neo-Marxist thinking sprinkled liberally throughout, a better read is THE WAY WE NEVER WERE, by Professor Stefanie Coontz. Although as a roughly 300 page tome, it's not a children's book, it addresses themes more squarely. It's also a sexier title, and I suspect Steff got there first with the title.

But for a good lookback, it's a great source of facts and reminders of how things were, from iron lungs to burning rivers.
  • Zieryn
Wouldn't recommend it. It was a whole lot of nothing about nothing.
  • Mezilabar
The book is very accurate but doesn't quite do justice to how those of us who lived those times care to remember. The nearness of family and friends overcame all the bad things mentioned in the book.
  • Cashoutmaster
When I read this book, I knew it would upset some people for whom the mythical idea they had in their head of those "happier, simpler times" would be exploded. What Mr. Finklestien forced me to realize in my reading of the book were basically two things.
Firstly, the human memory tends to be mercifully selective, emphasizing the positive and glossing over the negative. Be honest. Do you not feel that most people, yourself included, tend to have idealized memories of people that have gone on to their eternal rest ? The mere act of their passing made them better people in the minds of many who knew them. That works equally well with things, places and times that will never return. Many readers of this book will want to criticize Mr. Finkelstein for making them face the truth of the matter that, in the words of Mr. Joel, "The good old days weren't always good..." I am not among those. Instead, I greatly appreciate the author for the dose of reality.
Secondly, I have always been of the opinion that you cannot really "solve" problems. The act of eliminating one creates another. I believe that if you look at the wide screen that encompasses both past and present, you get a good illustration of my point. Some things about America's golden age were indeed better; some indeed weren't. I could write you a list right now as long as your arm of things from that era that I would love to see return, then turn right around and write an equally long list entitled, "But for God's sake, please let me never again see....."
My bottom line....I found Mr. Finkelstein's work very informative and interesting. For those who can handle the truth, it's a good read. But if you're among those who may become traumatized by having your mental version of those "good old days" challenged, my recommendation to you is to simply stay away.