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Download Helium (Understanding the Elements of the Periodic Table) eBook

by Heather Hasan

Download Helium (Understanding the Elements of the Periodic Table) eBook
ISBN:
1404207031
Author:
Heather Hasan
Category:
Science Nature & How It Works
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rosen Central (August 31, 2006)
EPUB book:
1408 kb
FB2 book:
1953 kb
DJVU:
1634 kb
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
904


I've read several books in the "Understanding the Elements of the Periodic Table" series for young adults (YA), and .

I've read several books in the "Understanding the Elements of the Periodic Table" series for young adults (YA), and although they follow the same format, much depends on the familiarity of the author with his or her subject. Helium's author, Heather Elizabeth Hasan has a vigorous and interesting style, but could have presented some of her facts a bit more carefully. For instance, contrary to the author's contention, Helium is indeed bound by gravity (as are all objects with mass-light, too, according to Einstein).

Each element within the periodic table has its own block. Within these blocks are identifying numbers and letters. The number on the very top is called the atomic number and it represents the number of protons in a single atom of the element.

Since its conception, the periodic table and the elements contained within it have shaped our modern lives

Since its conception, the periodic table and the elements contained within it have shaped our modern lives. The use of many elements is now ubiquitous and essential for the modern technologies we have now become accustomed to. However, our use of some elements may be considered as unsustainable and their current use may create both economic and environmental pressures. The United Nations have designated 2019 the International Year of the Periodic Table

Bibliographic Details. Title: Aluminum (Understanding the Elements of the. Explains the characteristics of aluminum, where it is found, how it is used by humans, and its relationship to other elements found in the periodic table.

Bibliographic Details. Publisher: Rosen Publishing Group. Publication Date: 2006. Visit Seller's Storefront. Excellent customer service.

The modern periodic table uses atomic number to arrange the atoms. Each successive atom has one more proton, thus the atomic number increases by one with each element. Atomic masses were the basis for the periodic table that Mendeleev developed. Since 2 + 2 4, we know that the mass number of the helium atom is 4. Finally, the helium atom also contains two electrons since the number of electrons must equal the number of protons.

Presentation on theme: "Understanding the Periodic Table of Elements"- Presentation transcript . 30 Groups or Families- vertical columns Elements in the same family have similar characteristics and the same number of valence electrons. 31 Some families have their own names.

Presentation on theme: "Understanding the Periodic Table of Elements"- Presentation transcript: 1 Understanding the Periodic Table of Elements. 2. 3. 4 Left of the Staircase are metals: 5 Properties of metals are: 6 Left of the staircase. 8 Malleable- Can be hammered into a thin sheet. 32 Alkali Metals First family Very reactive because of only 1 valence electron.

This title explores the second most abundant element in the universe. Helium (Understanding the Elements of the Periodic Table). 1404207031 (ISBN13: 9781404207035).

The first period of the periodic table is complete at helium, when the K shell is filled with two electrons. The first and second short periods represent the filling of the 2 s and 2 p subshells (completing the L shell at neon) and the 3 s and 3 p subshells (at argon), leaving the M shell incomplete. The successive periods of the system hence correspond to the introduction of electrons into the following orbitals: There are advantages to replacing the K, L, M . hells by a different grouping of the subshells, in which those with nearly the same energy are grouped together, in close correlation with the periodic system.

The periodic table of elements can be one of the more intimidating areas of study for young adults. This new series successfully breaks down six of the most common elements on the table by explaining each element in a clear manner

The periodic table of elements can be one of the more intimidating areas of study for young adults. This new series successfully breaks down six of the most common elements on the table by explaining each element in a clear manner. These compelling books approach the material in a unique fashion, taking the complex nature of the subject, and presenting it with easy-to-unde The periodic table of elements can be one of the more intimidating areas of study for young adults. This new series successfully breaks down six of the most common elements on the table by explaining each element in a clear.

Key to the periodic table, elements are organized on the table according to their atomic .

Key to the periodic table, elements are organized on the table according to their atomic number, usually found near the top of the square Common elements and symbols hydrogen helium, the hydrogen square sits atop the group aikali, and helium on top of the noble gases but neither are members of those groups. Hydrogen is in a class of its own, as is helium. They are gases at room temperature.

Explains the characteristics of helium, where it is found, how it is used by humans, and its relationship to other elements found in the periodic table.
  • Whitehammer
I've read several books in the "Understanding the Elements of the Periodic Table" series for young adults (YA), and although they follow the same format, much depends on the familiarity of the author with his or her subject. `Helium's author, Heather Elizabeth Hasan has a vigorous and interesting style, but could have presented some of her facts a bit more carefully.

For instance, contrary to the author's contention, Helium is indeed bound by gravity (as are all objects with mass--light, too, according to Einstein). Atoms of Helium are able to evaporate from Earth's atmosphere, but have more difficulty escaping from massive objects such as the Sun.

It is also not quite true that "Helium is the only element to be identified in space before being found on Earth!" Technetium (element 43) was discovered in the spectra of S-type red giant stars in 1952, before it was isolated in Congolese pitchblende ten years later.

"Helium" contains short but interesting discussions on noble gases and valence electrons, the hydrogen bomb, and superfluids. It is profusely illustrated in color, with photographs of the many uses of this element by a welder, scuba diver, balloon, and the air-tight case protecting the U.S. Constitution.

This would have been a good book to insert a few pages on the actual creation of the elements, since hydrogen and helium were born in inconceivable fury at the very birth of our Universe. For readers who would like to gain an understanding of how the elements were actually created, I can highly recommend Marcus Chown's The Magic Furnace: The Search for the Origins of Atoms.

For those readers who would like to further explore the mysteries of the periodic table, Nature's Building Blocks: An A-Z Guide to the Elements (2003) by John Emsley and The Periodic Table: Its Story and Its Significance (2007) by Eric R. Scerri are two very good treatments. For more general reading on the periodic table and how it sparked the interest of young scientists, two outstanding autobiographies are available: Uncle Tungsten: Memories of a Chemical Boyhood (2001) by Oliver Sacks and The Periodic Table (1975) by Primo Levi.
  • MARK BEN FORD
great book. This book really breaks the facts down for a beginner like me. Its easy to get overwhelmed when studying chemistry but this book will ease you in.