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Download The Spirit Stone (Book Five of the Dragon Mage, 5) eBook

by Katharine Kerr

Download The Spirit Stone (Book Five of the Dragon Mage, 5) eBook
ISBN:
0007128711
Author:
Katharine Kerr
Category:
Fantasy
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper Voyager (2007)
Pages:
416 pages
EPUB book:
1411 kb
FB2 book:
1532 kb
DJVU:
1287 kb
Other formats
mobi docx rtf lrf
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
384


THE SPIRIT STONE is the thirteenth book in Kerr's fifteen book Deverry series, and . In THE SPIRIT STONE, Kerr takes the time to put a fine finish on the rough edges, and to clean up after herself, literarily.

THE SPIRIT STONE is the thirteenth book in Kerr's fifteen book Deverry series, and is book two of "The Silver Wyrm Cycle," the fourth and concluding cycle in the saga. The Deverry books concern the life stories of Jill, the heroine of the saga. The second half of THE SPIRIT STONE recounts the assault on the Horsekin fortress of Zak Gral.

Book Five of The Dragon Mage. For all my readers without whom this series would not have existed. In some sense, every magician is a weaver, merely one who works with invisible strands of the hidden light. With it we weave our various forms, just as a weaver produces cloth, and then stitch them into the images we desire, just as a tailor sews cloth into a tunic or robe. But if we have plumbed the secret recesses of our art, if we are masters of our craft, then we can both weave the forms and place our own bodies within them.

Goodreads members voted The Spirit Stone (The Silver Wyrm, into the following lists: Best Heroic Fantasy, Best Books of the 21st Century, Sci-Fi, Fa. .Best Fantasy Books Under the Radar. 1893rd out of 1,949 books - 2,072 voters.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Spirit Stone: Book Two of.To help him destroy this threat, the elven prince has called upon his allies: the dwarven folk of the northern mountains and the human men of Deverry to the east.

Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Spirit Stone: Book Two of The Silver Wyrm" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. Their leaders know that if the Westlands fall to the Horsekin, their own throats will feel that dagger next. Joining them are two powerful dragons, who have their own bitter reasons to hate the Horsekin. But the fanatical Horsekin believe they have the most powerful ally of all, a new goddess.

Book Two of The Silver Wyrm.

A dagger laid against our throat. Book Two of The Silver Wyrm.

Book five of the Dragon Mage sequence by Katharine Kerr.

Katharine Kerr The Spirit Stone. I remember this,’ he said. Branna closed the book of medicines and walked over to the window

Katharine Kerr The Spirit Stone. Branna closed the book of medicines and walked over to the window. Outside lay the familiar view of her uncle’s dun wall and the green fields beyond. She’d half-expected to see a different prospect, though the details had escaped her memory. Somewhere I’ve never been, she thought, not as me, anyway. For a moment she saw their surroundings: a windowless stone room, and at the top of the walls ran a carving of circles and triangles, abruptly broken off as if someone had deliberately defaced it. Stop! she told herself. You’re Branna; Branna, not Jill.

The Spirit Stone Katharine Kerr. Book Five of The Dragon Mage. Book thirteen of the celebrated Deverry series, an epic fantasy rooted in Celtic mythology that intricately interweaves human and elven history over several hundred years. A dagger laid against our throat. So Prince Dar of the Westlands calls Zakh Gral, a new fortress built by the Horsekin, the ancient enemies of his people.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Such is the description Prince Dar of the Weslands uses for Zakh Gral. Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Joining them are two powerful dragons, who have their own bitter reasons to hate the Horsekin

Book Two of The Silver Wyrm. This interest soon led her into th. ore about Katharine Kerr.

  • adventure time
The author has developed an extremely interesting, challenging & complex series with her books. If you're able to read them in order, you'll see how each character is introduced then thoroughly developed down the line. I am only disappointed in the fact that there aren't more series from her - I've read her dragon books as well ;-) Amazon is to be HUGELY thanked for offering the books that it does at prices I can afford - the Sellers that I have dealt with are fantastic as well!
  • Shadowbourne
This is only one in a long series from Katherine Kerr. The entire series is very entertaining, and well-developed.
  • Doktilar
It's said that J.R.R. Tolkien invented an entirely new genre, "Sword and Sorcery," by creating The Lord of the Rings (I was recently advised by a role-playing fanatic that Tolkien's work, and Katharine Kerr's, falls under the rubric of "High Fantasy," but the difference between the two genres seems to be equivalent to the difference between purple and violet).

More relevantly, fully 30% of all fiction books published today fall into the genre, whatever name we give it. In truth, Tolkien breathed life back into the old Northern European myths about Elves and Dwarves and Trolls. The good Professor, an Oxford Don whose specialty was Philology, would be proud of Ms. Kerr, who puts her own fascinating and lively spin on the old myths.

The prolific Katharine Kerr taps into the ancient Celtic traditions to create the world of Annwn (literally meaning "Nowhere" in Welsh), an incredibly detailed, incredibly graphic land of the imagination filled with lost mountains, far valleys, and towns and villages whose denizens, most unknowingly, exist in a world filled with "Dweomer."

"Dwimmer," meaning "magic" or "sorcery," is an ancient English word, probably derived from the original Brythonic language spoken by the Celtic Britons in pre-Roman times. Likewise, "cwm" or "coombe," meaning "valley," appears only on Great British maps, the first variant being Welsh and the other Old English. "Weird" is a modern English word which means "bizarre," but it derives from the earlier word "weirding," a term applied to occultists who were supposedly able to alter fate.

Kerr's representational humans are descendants of European Continental Celts (Gauls), an historic people made up of numerous tribes who were decimated and dominated by the Roman legions commanded by Julius Caesar, circa 50 B.C. According to Kerr's mythology, the tribe living in the invented Gaulish Kingdom Devetia Riga was magically transported to Annwn, where they established the Kingdom of Deverry.

In keeping with ancient Celtic beliefs, Kerr crafts her epic in the form of an Eternal Knot. Theoretically, every tale she tells is the beginning, the middle, and the ending of the story, so that beginning the series with The Red Wyvern, book number nine, should bring you right up to THE SPIRIT STONE. However, given the numerous storylines and recurring characters in different incarnations that have developed over the course of thirteen novels so far, it's far easier to read the books in sequence (and you're advised to ignore the separate cycles, which do not really stand alone). THE SPIRIT STONE is the thirteenth book in Kerr's fifteen book Deverry series, and is book two of "The Silver Wyrm Cycle," the fourth and concluding cycle in the saga.

The Deverry books concern the life stories of Jill, the heroine of the saga. What Jill does not know is that her life is inextricably bound up with that of the Dweomermaster Nevyn. Long ago, Nevyn was once Galrion, a Prince of the Realm, but youthful impetuosity led to his exile, and more importantly, to the deaths of several innocent people including his royal fiancee, the Princess Brangwen, Jill's preincarnation.

Brangwen's tragic death caused Nevyn to take a rash vow---to live until he had undone all the wrong he'd caused. Kerr tells the long tale of Brangwen and Galrion in what amounts to a series of short novelettes-within-the-Deverry-novels. Along the way, Kerr fleshes out her colorful, lively universe, which is populated not only by the Deverrians, but by Elves and Dwarves, among many other beings.

THE SPIRIT STONE follows immediately upon The Gold Falcon. The warlike Horsekin, driven by their increasing religious fervor for the Alshandra Cult, have built a fortress right at the place where Horsekin lands, Gel Da'Thae lands, Elven lands, Dwarven lands, the Kingdom of Deverry and The Rhiddaer all share their borders, essentially dominating Annwn with the ability to strike in any direction. The fortress must be destroyed.

After briefly sketching out the crisis facing modern-day Deverry, Kerr takes us back in time to just before the opening of Daggerspell (book one of the saga). After the death of Branoic the Silver Dagger, Nevyn has been searching for Brangwen's latest reincarnation, and finds her. Her name is Morwen, and she is Jill's immediate preincarnation. Abused, mocked and feared as a witch for having a harelip, Morwen's only real happiness in life is being nursemaid to Salamander, who is her young, half-elven nephew. When Salamander's Elven father comes to take him away from his neglectful mother, Morwen happily goes with them. She befriends Loddlaen, the son of Nevyn's old apprentice, the dweomermaster Aderyn and the Elven dweomermaster Dallandra. Not even a formal apprentice himself, Loddlaen, unbeknownst to anyone else, recklessly decides to teach Morwen dweomer.

The second half of THE SPIRIT STONE recounts the assault on the Horsekin fortress of Zak Gral. During the assault, Salamander discovers a "shewstone" that holds the secret to the Silver Wyrm's transformation back into a man.

If you haven't read Katharine Kerr's "Deverry" books, you will find that very, very unlike Tolkien's Middle Earth, Annwn is rather tumbledown and casually violent. The stink of horse manure fills the air of the towns, roadside inns crawl with lice, ale, the universal drink, is dipped from open barrels (flies and all), drunken men with swords go to war over herds of pigs and cows or an inflated sense of ego disguised as honor, rape and robbery are commonplace, illegitimate children, though scorned, are ubiquitous, and the Deverrian tongue is replete with curses, most of which cannot be reprinted here. Kerr seems to delight in coming up with more and more outrageous expletive phraseology, my favorite of which is, "By the scaly underside of a dragon's ... !"

J.R.R. Tolkien wrote like the restrained University Don he was. Middle Earth has the vertical intellectual airiness of the dreaming spires of Oxford. Kerr writes like the Rust Belt native that she is. Working-class Deverry spills horizontally off the pages in an entertaining flood, which is why it took fifteen full novels to tell the tale.

The individual plotlines of the Deverry storylines are straightforward rather than rococo, with just a few curves here and there. There's not a lot of mystery here, not a lot of unanswered questions, and any resolution of suspense tends to be pretty much what you'd predict. In the end, the reader has to keep track of more than enough incarnations and karmic twists that the addition of diversionary plot elements within the stories themselves probably would have had the average reader screaming.

In reviewing the earlier Deverry novels, I noted that Kerr's writing was often unpolished and rough-edged despite the incredible energy of her storytelling. Kerr's introductions of new characters and plot twists always seemed to have an odd sense of afterthought about them. Since the series is written non-linearly, Kerr was able to plug in elements as needed to move the storylines along, but these plug-ins sometimes seemed sloppy, as when unforeshadowed events suddenly troubled preincarnated characters we already thought we knew well, throwing the basis of their storylines a bit out of balance. In THE SPIRIT STONE, Kerr takes the time to put a fine finish on the rough edges, and to clean up after herself, literarily.

The volumes of "The Silver Wyrm" Cycle "feel" different than the rest of the Deverry Saga; there is a sense of completeness to them that the earlier volumes simply didn't have. This is not merely because the story is drawing to its close. Rather, the books feel more self-contained. A reader, unfamiliar with Deverry, could pick up THE SPIRIT STONE and enjoy it as a stand-alone novel.

Kerr's authorial voice is stronger than it has ever been. In describing Morwen's first sight of the Sea of Grass, Kerr writes so splendidly that even I, a person with no graphic arts talent to speak of, was moved to consider sketching what she presented to my mind's eye, a perfect portrait in words.

As I noted in my review of The Gold Falcon, Kerr suffered a serious health problem and was forced to take a lengthy hiatus from the Deverry saga between 2000 and 2006. While just a shade less satisfying than its predecessor book, THE SPIRIT STONE earns five well-deserved stars. Katharine Kerr's ability to write matured tremendously in those six years, and her deft handling of plot twists, past events, and new characters is a sign of her growing ability and sheer talent as an author.
  • KiddenDan
good read
  • Rias
Another book in the Deverry series is done. I enjoyed it and I'm looking forward to the next in the series. Nothing earth shattering and it is consistent in stake from her other books. I liked getting to know more about the characters in different situations.
  • Kagda
Awesome book!
  • Siatanni
A good book, fits very well in the Deverry saga. Makes me very curious for what comes in the last books
I was specifically looking for The Spirit Stone for a DIFFERENT Katherine Kerr series (The Silver Wyrm) but instead I received The Spirit Stone for The Dragon Mage series. What author knowingly entitles two books the same?!?