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Download The Diamond Isle (Book 3) eBook

by Stan Nicholls

Download The Diamond Isle (Book 3) eBook
ISBN:
0739478605
Author:
Stan Nicholls
Category:
Fantasy
Publisher:
Harper Collins (2006)
EPUB book:
1704 kb
FB2 book:
1504 kb
DJVU:
1909 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
894


During book 2 and especially book 3, he keeps doing amazing that is kept from the reader

During book 2 and especially book 3, he keeps doing amazing that is kept from the reader. At the very end of the trilogy, this special effect, which until now has affected one city at a time, suddenly covers two entire empires. And then he walks off into the sunset. However, by throwing his lot in with the rebels, he is trapped with them on Diamond Isle at a time when fellow maniac Prince Melyobar sets in motion a plot to kill anyone he deems opposes him. War is imminent, but unbeknownst to either side in the upcoming hostilities are the rivers of magic Quicksilver liquid are being altered, but who, if anyone, has the power to achieve this and what will it mean?.

Stan Nicholls is best known for the internationally acclaimed Orcs: First Blood series. His journalism has appeared in Locus, SFX, the Guardian, the Independent, the Daily Mirror, Time Out, Sight and Sound, and Rolling Stone, among many other publications. He currently lives in the West Midlands, . with his wife, the writer Anne Gay.

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Читать онлайн The Diamond Isle.

Stan Nicholls The Diamond Isle Book Three of The DreamtimeThe story so fa. he known world’s magical system was created long ago by extinct race the Founders, though the quality of their sorcery was infinitely more powerful. Magic serves as technology, an instrument of repression and even legal tender. It defines social status. Its many manifestations, commonly referred to as glamours, include fake lifeforms. Читать онлайн The Diamond Isle. Book Three of The Dreamtime.

Immortality has been Reeth Caldason's curse, for it comes with tormenting visions and a savage rage. Yet only here can Reeth discover the path that will lead him to an understanding of his true nature. if he can survive the devastation to come.

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Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Diamond Isle: Book Three of The . The Dreamtime Series. Книга 3. Stan Nicholls13 октября 2009 г. Продавец: Harper Collins. Добавить в список желаний.

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Immortality has been Reeth Caldason's curse, for it comes with tormenting visions and a savage rage

Immortality has been Reeth Caldason's curse, for it comes with tormenting visions and a savage rage.

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Immortality has been Reeth Caldason's curse, for it comes with tormenting visions and a savage rage. In hope of a cure, he has traded his fighting skills for potential access to powerful ancient magic-a desperate gamble that leaves him trapped on the Diamond Isle, at the mercy of the bloodthirsty pirates who plague the surrounding waters. Yet only here can Reeth discover the path that will lead him to an understanding of his true nature . . . if he can survive the devastation to come. For the specter of war looms large, one that threatens to alter or destroy the world he knows.
  • Mave
The final book of this trilogy (The Diamond Isle), was better than the middle book (The Righteous Blade), but not as good as the first one (The Covenant Rising). The ubiquity of magic replacing modern technology in a medieval setting continued to be an issue. It was jarring in the first book, wearing in the second, and by this book I'd somewhat accepted it. Because the rest of the trilogy is well written, I kept trying to make sense of the approach - for example, in this last book, it occurred to me that maybe Nicholls was re-creating space opera battles using ocean frigates - but none of my attempts really worked. What was clear was that Nicholls was inspired by post 9/11 real-world events to make some fairly direct points about civil liberties versus security, etc - direct enough to pull me out of the book, and wonder again about the purpose (e.g., was the entire trilogy a satire or parable? I decided not).

Taking the story for its own sake, then, as a fantasy: It could have been stronger. As is often true with series or big books, what you expect to find at the end isn't always what you get. In this case, I expected Nicholls to deal with big questions about the Founders, the Dreamtime, magic, and the nature of the universe. He provides bland answers to the first two, and skips the others almost entirely. Instead, the trilogy is about politics and individuals. The latter is often overlooked in epic fantasy, and I give Nicholls credit for addressing it here. Unfortunately, he doesn't carry through the strong characterization from book 1. For example, in book 2, several characters casually fall in love, and there's a terrible betrayal. In this book, we have to take for granted that casual love has turned into deep passion. The betrayal fades from a severe shock to a constant repetition of "I wish I hadn't done that." Despite a long setup, Nicholls doesn't wring from the situation the turbulent emotion and difficult choices that he could have.

Many of the deeper questions get pretty off-hand answers. For example, Reeth has been searching for something since book 1. Near the end of this book, he heads off, finds it right away, and casually walks in with "we must have been destined to find it, and that's why no one else did." It's pretty unsatisfying. Similarly, the fearsome warlord Zerreiss has been just off-screen for most of the trilogy. During book 2 and especially book 3, he keeps doing amazing that is kept from the reader. At the very end of the trilogy, this special effect, which until now has affected one city at a time, suddenly covers two entire empires. And then he walks off into the sunset.

Where book 1 was 3.5 stars, this one was 2.5. The writing was quite good, but the wrapup was disappointing.

In looking at the trilogy overall, I quite enjoyed book 1, Covenant Rising, but I can't really recommend the whole series.
  • Kage
Excellent read
  • Weiehan
If the price is right, I'll buy the book that finishes the series and then donate it to my local Library.
  • Angana
I bought this book for my girlfriend and she just loves it. It is part of a trilogy and this was the only one she hadn't read.
  • Forey
The third book in a series destined to disappoint me.

The Dream Time concept started interestingly enough, with a lone-wolf character (the grizzled veteran who likes no one, trusts no one, et cetera) taking on a young companion (moderately inept but good of heart). A well-known story, but moderately enjoyable.

The third book, however, seems intent upon doing several things, and one of them is finishing up everything on schedule. There are quite a few points where, in reading this book, I can see or imagine that Nichols had some grand plans in mind... but he ends up short-cutting his way to the end result, either out of time constraints, lack of patience or just because he's tired of writing this story. There was a big moment of that in "Orcs" and it really shows in the Dream Time series.

When characters flip a switch and answers that were elusive for decades are suddenly revealed, it lessens a story, and that's what happened here. After spending almost 100 years looking for a solution, the main character is guided to it with an ease that the author sells as "fate" and which I didn't appreciate.

None of the characters really develop in this book. The only change is really the ironic twist for the main character at the end, which is spelled out for us, and a page or two where the character achieves superpowers.

The final conflicts do not live up to the hype (which we spent two books and $25 getting to) and that's aggravating.

In short, I feel like this story was sloppily constructed and poorly executed. I say this even though it's the kind of story I would normally enjoy, as long as it was done right.

If you enjoyed Micheal Stackpole's "The Grand Crusade", Roger Zelazny's "The Dream Master" or David Eddings' "Elenium" series, you may well enjoy this book.
  • TheMoonix
I loved Orcs by Stan Nichols, so I thought I'd give this a shot. The same evocative writing was there, as well as the original ideas. I don't think it's quite as good as the Orcs series, but still well worth checking out.
  • Lynnak
The resistance knew they could not survive a direct confrontation with the dictatorial stronger Empire so they fled to Diamond Isle to forge their own society. However, betrayal has left them on the brink of annihilation.

The visions haunt him long after the last episode occurs; the blood curdling berserker gets out from within him too often. Reeth Caldason wants out of the madness of immortality so he has sought a magical Source that will enable him to die. However, by throwing his lot in with the rebels, he is trapped with them on Diamond Isle at a time when fellow maniac Prince Melyobar sets in motion a plot to kill anyone he deems opposes him. War is imminent, but unbeknownst to either side in the upcoming hostilities are the rivers of magic Quicksilver liquid are being altered, but who, if anyone, has the power to achieve this and what will it mean?.

The third Dreamtime fantasy is a terrific conclusion to an exciting saga. The story line initially sets in motion the final events towards the ultimate confrontation. Yet with plenty of action for the hero and others to contend with from pirates, Melyobar, Reeth's personal foe Devlor Bastorran and Zerreiss the barbarian leader, Caldason seems more human than the in the previous books (see THE RIGHTEOUS BLADE and THE COVENANT RISING). This is partly caused by his attraction to rebel warrior Serrah and his mentoring of apprentice mage Kutch. The various forces come together in an epic finale.

Harriet Klausner