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Download The King of the Crags: The Memory of Flames, Book II eBook

by Stephen Deas

Download The King of the Crags: The Memory of Flames, Book II eBook
ISBN:
0451463765
Author:
Stephen Deas
Category:
Fantasy
Language:
English
Publisher:
Roc; First Edition edition (February 1, 2011)
Pages:
400 pages
EPUB book:
1363 kb
FB2 book:
1577 kb
DJVU:
1378 kb
Other formats
mbr lrf lit docx
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
631


Stephen Deas never gives too much away about any of them yet at the same time never makes them so closed that . King of the Crags actually seems to bump up the stakes and pretty much no one gets out of this book without some sort of tragedy.

Stephen Deas never gives too much away about any of them yet at the same time never makes them so closed that you don’t care for them either. I have a passionate dislike What I Liked: The pace of the story is carefully measured, never too slow, often fast and always keeping you reading all the way through. just so it can hurt when he ruins them.

Электронная книга "The King of the Crags: The Memory of Flames", Stephen Deas. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The King of the Crags: The Memory of Flames" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

I just finished reading The King of Crags, book two of the Memory of Flames series, by Stephen Deas

I just finished reading The King of Crags, book two of the Memory of Flames series, by Stephen Deas. I had a hard time at first knowing what was going on, who was whom, and what their motivations were. The king of the crags. Пользовательский отзыв - Kirkus. The brutal scheming continues in Book II of The Memory of Flames series (The Adamantine Palace, 2010), set in a world where king and queens enslave dragons with alchemical potions that deaden the.

Fire will sweep the bones of the world. Out of flames there shall come a white dragon, and with the dragon a red rider.

The King of the Crags ( Memory of Flames - 2 ) Stephen Deas Stephen Deas The King of the Crags Prologue The Dead The Worldspine surrounded them. Mountains like immense. Fire will sweep the bones of the world. Thieves and liars shall quiver and weep, for the rider's name shall be Justice and the dragon shall be Vengeance. The hand pressed harder against his brow.

I just finished reading The King of Crags, book two of the Memory of Flames series, by Stephen Deas. I had a hard time at first knowing what was going on, who was whom, and what their motivations were; the book apparently picks up right after the events of first book and, to me, does little to explain what came before except for a little bit in passing that can be inferred from conversations or from other events. But once I got into the book, I couldn't put it down!I happen to like a good dragon book, and The King of Crags doesn't disappoint with dragons. These dragons are oppressed.

The King of the Crags: The Memory of Flames, Book I. I enjoyed these books, dragons with an awareness, and somewhat human qualities makes for really good reading, the book is full of drama happiness sadness.

The King of the Crags: The Memory of Flames, Book II. Stephen Deas. I enjoyed these books, dragons with an awareness, and somewhat human qualities makes for really good reading, the book is full of drama happiness sadness, and war. Can't wait to see who survives. Are the realms completely taking over. Who's coming from over the sea a book and I can't wait wait to read the next one is a good one.

The Memory of Flames, Book II. by Stephen Deas. In his "utterly fascinating" (Book Smuggler) debut, The Adamantine Palace, Stephen Deas "restored to all their scaly fire- breathing glory" (Daily Telegraph)

The Memory of Flames, Book II. In his "utterly fascinating" (Book Smuggler) debut, The Adamantine Palace, Stephen Deas "restored to all their scaly fire- breathing glory" (Daily Telegraph). Now, as the Realms teeter on the brink of war, the fate of humanity rests in the survival of one majestic white dragon. Prince Jehal has had his way-now his lover Zafir sits atop the Realms with hundreds of dragons and their riders at her beck and call. But Jehal's plots are far from over, for he isn't content to sit back and watch Zafir command the earth and sky.

Stephen Deas The King of the Crags Prologue The DeadThe Worldspine surrounded them. The flames of destruction have come, and out of the flames the red rider shall be born. Be Justice, Rider Semian. Mountains like immense teeth, jagged and huge and white, reared up all around their little valley. Monsters overshadowing the dense dark greens and blacks of the pine forest surrounding a lake of glacier water, the brightest purest blue that Kemir had ever seen. Very slowly, they were dying. Be the red rider and find the dragon whose name is Vengeance.

Stephen Deas, born in 1968 in Southeast England, is an English fantasy author. He is most famous for his fantasy opus, the Memory of Flames sequence, set in a fantasy world inhabited by dragons. Deas was raised in a town full of army veterans. He has a bachelor's degree in theoretical physics at Cambridge University and had a job at BAE Systems, doing "mathsy stuff". He now lives in Essex, writes full-time, and is married and has two children. The Adamantine Palace (2009). The King of the Crags (2010). In his utterly fascinating (Book Smuggler) debut, The Adamantine Palace, Stephen Deas restored to all their scaly fire- breathing glory (Daily Telegraph)

The Memory of Flames, Book II. Part of Memory Of Flames. Category: Epic Fantasy. In his utterly fascinating (Book Smuggler) debut, The Adamantine Palace, Stephen Deas restored to all their scaly fire- breathing glory (Daily Telegraph).

In his "utterly fascinating" (Book Smuggler) debut, The Adamantine Palace, Stephen Deas "restored [dragons] to all their scaly fire- breathing glory" (Daily Telegraph). Now, as the Realms teeter on the brink of war, the fate of humanity rests in the survival of one majestic white dragon. Prince Jehal has had his way-now his lover Zafir sits atop the Realms with hundreds of dragons and their riders at her beck and call. But Jehal's plots are far from over, for he isn't content to sit back and watch Zafir command the earth and sky. He wants that glory for himself- no matter who he must sacrifice to get it. The one thing Jehal fears is that the white dragon still lives-and if that is so, then blood will flow, on all sides...
  • Karon
King of Crags picks up right where The Adamantine Palace left off. The realms are in chaos, Zafir is speaker and the white dragon is still on the lose.

I quite enjoyed The Adamantine Palace. It was a great mix of action, dragon flights and political intrigue. The King of Crags maybe focuses a little too much on the dragon flights and the intrigue.

Stephen Deas is a great writer. His prose is clear and just fun to read, and he paints some amazing images of mountains and soaring dragons. But they're not terribly exciting.

Much of the book seems to be people arguing about going to war, rather than actually going to war. And while this (for the most part) is done quite well, it felt very drawn out.

About a third of way in, I got excited. The King of Crags had arrived. Then nothing. He's an old man who falls asleep through a meeting. The book would have been better named, The King of Furymouth, as the main character is obviously Jehal.

Jehal. Are we meant to feel sorry for him? I did a little. But he brings so much of his trouble on himself. I'd rather have read more about Kemir and Snow, but much of those chapters are very similar (almost too similar) to the Kemir and Snow chapters of book 1.

Reading back over this review, it sounds like I didn't like King of the Crags. So why give it 4 stars? Well I did like it. It was a fun, fast read and I enjoyed it.

The problem? King of Crags is very much a "middle-of-the-trilogy" kind of book. There's a lot going on but nothing really happens.

Stephen Deas is a great fantasy writer and one that I will definitely continue to follow. Here's looking forward to book 3.
  • Coiwield
This was really a depressing book and also rather confusing. The characters seemed to change sides so often that sometimes it was hard to keep track of them all. Also, the white dragon seemed to be left behind and was hardly mentioned at the end. I read the Adamantine Palace and was enough interested to want to find out what happened with the characters. However, this book was so bleak that if there is a sequel, I don't think I'll bother reading it.
  • Gorisar
Battelogue. Competently written. I have absolutely no desire to read further than the first trilogy once it was obvious it was going to more of same.
  • Mariwyn
Book II of Memory of Flames is much better than Book I in my opinion, though I enjoyed Book I very much. However, I had to adjust my understanding of past books I read and realize that the author is very different from others and the manner and style should not be a detriment but in fact a refreshing way to read stories.

Because there was a lengthy pause between purchasing Books I and II, I re-read Book I to familiarize myself with the characters and plot and discovered something I hadn't realized the first time around. Now, for those of you that may be having difficulty with these books due to PLOT(s), let me give you a major Aha! moment, think Lord of The Rings. Not because the story(s) is similar, but because of the different plot lines that traveled simultaneously parallel to each other and yet where very much a part of the story.

If you recall in LOTR, there where many characters that once they meet they all go their separate ways to achieve the same goal. And in the movie we watch how each goes about doing their tasks. In both books - Memory of Flames - the same occurs. We are introduced to characters from different "families" and go along in their ventures as they attempt to survive incidences that are either predestined or manipulated by others, to achieve a final "cause". We the reader are witnesses to each of their occurrences, and we have to appreciate what happens wether we like it or not. Now that that's put in perspective somewhat, I hope it helps you move through the books.

"King of Crags" is truly a remarkable tale full of intrigue and mystery. Don't get too wrapped up on the title, it's my belief that it's a set up for Book III though I could be wrong.

One last note, I really like how this author takes important characters and uses them to their maximum potential and leaves the reader agasht in how they are manipulated. It's brilliant that we as a reader can become so invested in a character and not realized their value in a plot or story line when something happens to them until much later. I love how this author used the reader to impose emotion in character importance where there was none, and yet our emotions continue to drive the story forward because we insist that vengeance must be served.

Book III is already out in Europe, but I'm holding out until 2012 because I want the cover that matches the other two books.

Personally I love the series Memory of The Flames!
  • MOQ
"I remember, I remember The Flames." --Silence, The Dragon.

This book takes up where the very stale, "Adementine Palace" ends at. This book has more detail and added history necessary to understand the trilogy also it has the one thing the first book is lacking A MAP!

The story starts off with Zafir as Speaker of the Realms, and that is enough for all the chaos to break forth. Snow, is just being Snow, eating people, trying to regain her memory, going back and forth with Kemir, and trying to formulate a plan to liberate the dragons from the power of oppressive mankind.

Jehal, is Jehal and has a roller coaster adventure in this tale. The addition of The Night Watchman and other intrigue as the realms head for total war.

The most interesting character, "The King of Crags" shows up for a little bit and committs to a major action.

Rider Semian goes mad, which made the book difficult to read as it focuses on him and the, "Red Riders" a bit too much, but once it weaves it's way through their portion of the story it takes off.

Better depth than the first book.
  • Raniconne
It's hard to stop reading. The characters are such that you wish them to burn! Or succeed, depends on preference. Love the building of the world and its histor. Recommended for sure.
  • Blackstalker
Great story; love the development of the dragons and the hints at a larger historical context
Loving the series so far, love how the story is progressing. This particular book takes a little getting used to with the jumping around the timeline but still awesome!