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Download Revenge Of The Rose eBook

by Michael Moorcock

Download Revenge Of The Rose eBook
ISBN:
0441718442
Author:
Michael Moorcock
Category:
Fantasy
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ace Hardcover; 1st edition (November 1, 1991)
Pages:
244 pages
EPUB book:
1636 kb
FB2 book:
1806 kb
DJVU:
1649 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
689


Home Michael Moorcock The Revenge of the Rose. This time he headed eastward, into the lands known as the Valederian Directorates, where he had heard of a certain globe said to display the nations of the future

Home Michael Moorcock The Revenge of the Rose. The revenge of the rose, . This time he headed eastward, into the lands known as the Valederian Directorates, where he had heard of a certain globe said to display the nations of the future. In that globe he hoped to learn something of his own fate, but in seeking it he earned the enmity of that ferocious horde known as the Haghan’iin Host, who captured and tortured him a little before he escaped and joined forces with the nobles of Anakhazhan to do battle with the. The Chronicle of the Black Sword. Book one concerning the fate of empires.

A Hellblade Misplaced

A Hellblade Misplaced.

Michael John Moorcock (born 18 December 1939) is an English writer and musician, primarily of. .The Revenge of the Rose (1991).

Michael John Moorcock (born 18 December 1939) is an English writer and musician, primarily of science fiction and fantasy, who has also published literary novels. She illustrated some of Moorcock's books, including covers, including the Gloriana dustjacket  . The Dorian Hawkmoon series (1967–1975), including

Revenge of the Rose book. New from World Fantasy Award-winning author Michael Moorcock, the powerful conclusion to his epic Elric saga.

Revenge of the Rose book. With his vampiric blade, the albino warrior embarks on his most astonishing quest ever-for the father who never loved him, and for the revenge of his beautiful and powerful ally, a woman called The Rose.

Michael Moorcock, 1939 - Writer Michael Moorcock was born December 18, 1939 in Mitcham, Surrey, England . Moorcock also wrote books and stories that featured the character Jerry Cornelius, who had no consistent character or appearance.

Michael Moorcock, 1939 - Writer Michael Moorcock was born December 18, 1939 in Mitcham, Surrey, England to Arthur and June (Taylor) Moorcock. He was married to writer Hilary Bailey from 1962-1978 and had three children with her. He also married Jill Riches, in 1978, and Linda Mullens Steele, in 1983. The Condition of Muzak" completed the initial Jerry Cornelius tetralogy and won Guardian Literary Prize in 1977.

Michael Moorcock has the power to draw us into a fantasy world like no other. You won't be able to put this book down as you travel through the universe with the main character Elric. HIs emotional journey is spellbinding. Some sequences are spot-on awesome (fire beetles, tons of corpses blow apart via sorcery); and many are silly and wildly coincidental (a cameo from Whiskers the winged, fighting cat, really?). Moorcock has a weird milieu in his Eternal Champion multiverse, and has dream-like worlds. In Fortress, this dreaminess is explicit, since Elric travels in dreams for 50% of the book.

Revenge of the Rose is written in a different style than the original series, which is no surprise, considering each of the . I would not recommend picking this book to start your reading in Moorcock's universe

Revenge of the Rose is written in a different style than the original series, which is no surprise, considering each of the 6 books are different in their own right. Revenge has some of the MOST descriptive scenes about Elric I have read yet. The scene in the Gypsy Nation whene Elric creeps down in the early morning to painfully ingest Dragon Venom gave me chills. I would not recommend picking this book to start your reading in Moorcock's universe. But for those already indoctrinated, it is a wonderful revel in the lands introduced in at least a couple of Moorcock's other tales, with Moorcock's favored theme of having characters from different series intermingle.

Feared by enemies and friends alike, Elric of Melnibone walks a lonely path among the worlds of the multiverse. The destroyer of his own cruel and ancient race, as well as its final ruler, Elric is the bearer of a destiny as dark and cursed as the vampiric sword he carries - the sentient black blade known as Stormbringer. The soul of Elric's father is tortured and suffering. To free it, Elric must face the princes of hell, and put all of his trust in one woman - the Rose.

The Revenge of the Rose. Moorcock wrote a rich and emotional without being long winded; the narrative is also infused with twists and turns and some hints of melodrama that ideally works well with this type of tale. Hardcover Paperback Kindle. The other thing that you will find amazing about this novel is the concept of dream couch which the Melnibonean rulers make use of.

Continuing Moorcock's saga of Elric the albino sorcerer prince and mercenary warrior (The Fortress of the Pearl, 1989, et., whose blade Stombringer devours the souls of those it slays. This time out, a dragon brings Elric before the ghost of Sadric his father; Sadric requires Elric to locate his soul, now reposing in a rosewood box in a far distant land, and restore it to him-or Sadric's ghost will be welded to Elric with horrid consequences.

After hearing the voice of his dead father--a man who, while living, had been caught between the bitter rivalry of two lords--Elric, the albino warrior, embarks on his most astonishing quest
  • Vojar
It's okay for an Elric novel I guess. Michael Moorecock switches back and forth between past tense and present tense VERY often. Sometimes he does it in the same sentence. That, and the ridiculously elaborate explanations that go on and on and become run on sentences really made me not want to read it. At several points, I felt like yelling "WE GET IT!" If you like the bizarre, this is for you because it goes off the charts even for an Elric book.

I felt it was a good story but very annoying to read.
  • Faebei
The Elric saga are some of the best Sword & Sorcery stories ever written and this book is no exception. Highly recommended along with the rest of the series. Michael Moorcock is a genius.
  • Kulafyn
Easily my favorite in the Elric Saga. I had this edition once before and lost it. I'm so happy to have another copy and in such excellent condition.
  • Oreavi
great
  • Nightscar
Moorcock is truly a master of fantasy.

Give him a read if you want to know what good fantasy is like without the influence of Tolkien. (He was a contemporary, and said in interviews that he never read Tolkien.)

Tolkien focused on norse mythology, but Moorcock grew up reading Finnish mythology at his boarding school. It shows, and the resulting work is masterful, and of a very different flavor than the post-Tolkien fantasy world. I hope more people read Moorcock, especially writers!
  • Zodama
Michael Moorock returned to the most famous character of his multiverse in the late 1980s and early 1990s as he brought back Elric, the aristocratic antihero who ranks as one of the most popular creations in the fantasy genre. The result were books like "The Fortress of the Pearl" and "The Revenge of the Rose."

"The Revenge of the Rose" is a bit of an odd fit in the Elric books and fans of the earlier novels--some of which were penned almost three decades before this one--will find it to be quite different. Elric remains at the center of the story but Moorock is more willing to allow readers his view on society, such as a stinging look at contemporary capitalism and real estate in a strange nomadic city. It's different than some of the earlier books and Moorcock also goes deeper into his multiverse. There is an excellent foil for Elric in this book who would come back to haunt him in later novels--Gaynor the Damned, a fallen knight who was trying to preserve the balance between Law and Chaos. There are some fun action scenes and the book should hold the attention of most readers.

Still, there are some problems. Moorcock tries to leave the reader with a sense of time being disrupted by playing around between past and present tense. It simply did not work. Moorcock's attempts to bring humor to the story with a poet familiar with contemporary literature and Elric's reactions to them. This is inconsistent at best. Some of the supporting characters--including the Rose included in the title--are not fully fleshed out, something of a disappointment compared to other recent Moorcock works.

Still, while this does not rank among the best Elric books, "Revenge of the Rose" is a solid story that should appeal to most fans of Moorcock, Elric and the multiverse.
  • Hanad
It seems like a lot of Elric fans are kinda down on this installment of the eternal saga, but I can't really see why. Moorcock's voice here seems to have matured well, and I found it on the whole quite an enjoyable ride. If I were to complain about anything, just to have something negative to say, I'm a bit surprised that his editor let him get away with quite so many monstrously long run-on sentences, but that's a quibble. Highly recommended for fans who do not work at The Android's Dungeon.
The last (so far) installment of Moorcock's Elric Saga, The Revenge of the Rose is a book written for fans only. I would not recommend picking this book to start your reading in Moorcock's universe. But for those already indoctrinated, it is a wonderful revel in the lands introduced in at least a couple of Moorcock's other tales, with Moorcock's favored theme of having characters from different series intermingle. The timeless wit of Wheldrake (from Moorcock's award-winning Glorianna) is a pleasant counterpoint to the dark, doom-ridden Elric, and the Rose is a wonderfully rich character all her own. Perhaps most interesting is the examination of the relationship between Elric and his spiteful father (who, for you non-initiates, blamed Elric for killing his mother in childbirth and hated Elric until his death, sometime before the stories begin). The idea of two souls who despise each other being trapped in the same body may not be new, but Moorcock's angle on the situation is brilliant and innovative. More intelligent and true to the original series than the other concurrent-sequel, The Fortress of the Pearl (which wasn't exactly shabby itself), this is a must-read for any fan of the albino anti-hero.