almediah.fr
» » Buddha, Vol. 1: Kapilavastu

Download Buddha, Vol. 1: Kapilavastu eBook

by Osamu Tezuka

Download Buddha, Vol. 1: Kapilavastu eBook
ISBN:
0007224516
Author:
Osamu Tezuka
Category:
Fantasy
Language:
English
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers (2006)
Pages:
400 pages
EPUB book:
1339 kb
FB2 book:
1814 kb
DJVU:
1949 kb
Other formats
doc mbr azw lit
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
528


Osamu Tezuka’s vaunted storytelling genius, consummate skill at visual expression, and warm humanity . Tezuka evidences his profound grasp of the subject by contextualizing the Buddha’s ideas; the emphasis is on movement.

Osamu Tezuka’s vaunted storytelling genius, consummate skill at visual expression, and warm humanity blossom fully in his eight-volume epic of Siddhartha’s life and times.

The birth of Siddharta practically just appeared in the last few pages of the 256-page manga. Though that surprised me a little, it makes sense.

Osamu Tezuka's vaunted storytelling genius, consummate skill at visual expression, and warm humanity blossom fully in his eight-volume epic of Siddhartha's life and times

Osamu Tezuka’s vaunted storytelling genius, consummate skill at visual expression, and warm humanity blossom fully in his eight-volume epic of. . Tezuka evidences his profound grasp of the subject by contextualizing the Buddha’s ideas; the emphasis is on movement, action, emotion, and conflict as the prince Siddhartha runs away from home, travels across India, and questions Hindu practices such as ascetic self-mutilation and caste oppression.

Osamu Tezuka (8 items) list by Nusch. Very rarely do I finish reading a Tezuka book feeling disgruntled and not surprisingly this was just about the absolute opposite of this book

Osamu Tezuka (8 items) list by Nusch. School didn't make it sound this cool. Very rarely do I finish reading a Tezuka book feeling disgruntled and not surprisingly this was just about the absolute opposite of this book.

A book that does not look new and has been read but is in excellent condition. No obvious damage to the cover, with the dust jacket (if applicable) included for hard covers

Devadatta (Buddha, Book 3) (Buddha) by Osamu Tezuka. A book that does not look new and has been read but is in excellent condition. No obvious damage to the cover, with the dust jacket (if applicable) included for hard covers. No missing or damaged pages, no creases or tears, and no ting of text or writing in the margins.

Uploaded by Gede Wahyu Prasetya. Flag for inappropriate content. Download as PDF or read online from Scribd.

Originated in the 1970s, Buddha is Osamu Tezuka's unparalleled rendition of the life and times of Prince Siddhartha. 400 page Trade Paperback · 9780007224517 Submit Corrections · Submit Variant Cover.

Osamu Tezuka’s vaunted storytelling genius, consummate skill at visual expression, and warm humanity blossom fully in his eight-volume epic of Siddhartha’s life and times. Tezuka evidences his profound grasp of the subject by contextualizing the Buddha’s ideas; the emphasis is on movement, action, emotion, and conflict as the prince Siddhartha runs away from home, travels across India, and questions Hindu practices such as ascetic self-mutilation and caste oppression. Rather than recommend resignation and impassivity, Tezuka’s Buddha predicates enlightenment upon recognizing the interconnectedness of life, having compassion for the suffering, and ordering one’s life sensibly. Philosophical segments are threaded into interpersonal situations with ground-breaking visual dynamism by an artist who makes sure never to lose his readers’ attention.Tezuka himself was a humanist rather than a Buddhist, and his magnum opus is not an attempt at propaganda. Hermann Hesse’s novel or Bertolucci’s film is comparable in this regard; in fact, Tezuka’s approach is slightly irreverent in that it incorporates something that Western commentators often eschew, namely, humor.
  • Shezokha
I had no issues reading this on both a Kindle Paperwhite and an Android phone. It's set in an odd format though: each page is read from left to right, but the book overall is read from right to left.

After a promising set up, this manga quickly becomes boring. The art is just too cartoony and childish, though ironically there is nudity and violence on every page. The plot wastes too much time with shonen antics and Buddha himself is not even in most of the book. It's an interesting concept that was poorly executed.
  • Malaunitly
Many people are most familiar with Tezuka through his 1960's anime TV shows, Astro Boy or Kimba, the White Lion as those are the works that received the widest world distribution. Those shows were inventive with strong references to Disney but also a jarring sense of anarchy. Many of Tezuka's manga stories are the same plus he frequently breaks the fourth wall especially during scenes of high drama with goofy comic slapstick or having his characters tear up the comic panels to express rage. What I found amazing was that unlike others authors Tezuka didn't feel that he needed to change his style when tackling the story of Buddha and this takes some getting used to. In later volumes Tezuka actually puts himself into the story questioning the liberties he's taking.

After I got past the anachronisms (characters referring to modern products) and the attempts to use modern idiom (example: the use of the phrase "my peeps"), it was hard to put the book down. In fact I read a volume a day. Tezuka draws the way he feels like and that means that the characters range from classic semi-realistic manga to Japanese comic style to pure Disney (especially the crocodiles) all against realistically drawn backgrounds. The female characters are almost always drawn half-naked, just like Indian sculpture and paintings from that period. It may be a little hard for the Western senses to have semi-naked women involved with serious religious discussion but that's our problem not the story. The dialog is in the percussive manga style but the ideas of Buddhism are there and you can follow the road of Buddha's conflicts as he reaches his final philosophy.
  • Faezahn
This series was recommended to me by a friend in Chennai, a biophysics professor whose daughter read the books, and who stumbled into it through her. He found Tezuka's Buddha series engaging, anachronistic, humorous, bizarre, gripping, and somehow also capturing the enormous spiritual and intellectual ferment and tumult of India in those far-off days, a vitality now almost entirely dissipated.
I was not terribly familiar with the details of the Buddha story, and knew Tezuka only through his Tetsuwan Atomu ("Iron-armed Atom", aka "Astro Boy") and so I took it up.
I found the series a compelling read, going straight through Vol 1-8 in about three days. I can sympathize with the reviewer who found it bizarre and disturbing; reference by 6th BC Indians to the New York Yankees baseball season does rather pull one up. Somehow though, and quite remarkably, Tezuka's innocence(?)/irreverence(?) succeeds in thoroughly humanizing Gautama Buddha, making both him & his times tangible and vivid and real. This is definitely not hagiography. Nor is it Herman Hesse-style adorational poetry. It is, however, wonderful and dynamic storytelling.
  • Gavinranara
I have just finished reading the complete series for the third time. I am always amazed how Tezuka managed to make a book about Buddha which is funny, touching and without pandering for religious groups. It is just the amazing journey of a man to find within himself the promise of peace and self preservation.
Tezuka has made the book very witty, and even adlibs here and there with funny characters. If you want to add some variety to your reading, this final series by the brilliant master of drawing, scripting and framing, Osamu Tezuka is strongly recommended.
Just read it for fun, without too much of an expectation, or looking to find flaws in the book, since it is linked to a man that becomes enlightened and starts a religion. Tezuka does not proselytize. He was at the end of his life, when writing this series, so he could care less. The series is fresh, and has some innocence to it, a quality that is so hard to find these days... I am sorry if the review sounds very one-dimensional, but I had never read anything by Tezuka, and this series was one of the best comic book series I have ever read.
  • Skyway
We've been reading the eight volumes from beginning to end in our Tezuka fever. Buddha certainly feels like a major work and I would recommend it both as a dedicated approach to the figure of Buddha and as classic of storytelling. But Buddha is most importantly enjoyable to see Tezuka developing some of his most irreverent and personal jokes, interwoven in story.

However, given the subject it lacks the sensationalist and gripping (if repetitive) taste of some of his one mammoth serialized volumes such as MV or the Ode to Kirihito. Buddha is published in English in 8 volumes and things really take shape towards volume 3 or 4, and become quite amazing in terms of the medium towards the final part. If you are not in for the full ride I'd probably recommend other works from him.