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by Branch James Cabell

Download Jurgen (A Comedy of Justice) eBook
ISBN:
1428055754
Author:
Branch James Cabell
Category:
Fantasy
Language:
English
Publisher:
IndyPublish (April 12, 2007)
Pages:
300 pages
EPUB book:
1349 kb
FB2 book:
1578 kb
DJVU:
1437 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.3
Votes:
426


Jurgen, A Comedy of Justice is a fantasy novel by American writer James Branch Cabell, which gained fame (or notoriety) shortly after its publication in 1919.

Jurgen, A Comedy of Justice is a fantasy novel by American writer James Branch Cabell, which gained fame (or notoriety) shortly after its publication in 1919. It is a humorous romp through a medieval cosmos, including a send-up of Arthurian legend, and excursions to Heaven and Hell as in The Divine Comedy. Cabell's work is recognized as a landmark in the creation of the comic fantasy novel, influencing Terry Pratchett and many others.

By. James branch cabell. Of JURGEN eke they maken mencioun, That of an old wyf gat his youthe agoon, And gat himselfe a shirte as bright as fyre Wherein to jape, yet gat not his desire In any countrie ne condicioun. Before each tarradiddle, Uncowed by sciolists, Robuster persons twiddle Tremendously big fists. Our gods are good," they tell us; "Nor will our gods defer Remission of rude fellows' Ability to er. So this, your JURGEN, travels Content to compromise Ordainments none unravels Explicitly.

By. Now do you judge me fairly," cried Jurgen to his judges, "if there be any justice in this mad country

By. Now do you judge me fairly," cried Jurgen to his judges, "if there be any justice in this mad country. And if there be none, do you relegate me to limbo or to any other place, so long as in that place this tumblebug is not omnipotent and sincere and insane.

Cabell James Jurgen. A Comedy of Justice - читать книгу онлайн бесплатно. Of JURGEN eke they maken mencioun, That of an old wyf gat his youthe agoon, And gat himselfe a shirte as bright as fyre

By. Of JURGEN eke they maken mencioun, That of an old wyf gat his youthe agoon, And gat himselfe a shirte as bright as fyre. Wherein to jape, yet gat not his desire. A Foreword: Which Asserts Nothing. Nescio quid certe est: et Hylax in limine latrat. No thorough investigation of this epos can be said to have appeared in print, anywhere, prior to the publication, in 1913, of the monumental Synopses of Aryan Mythology by Angelo de Ruiz.

Jurgen; a comedy of justice. by. Cabell, James Branch, 1879-1958. Middle Ages, Devil, Wives. New York, R. M. McBride & company.

It is not always wholesome," Jurgen submitted, "to speak of Koshchei. It seems especially undesirable in a dark place like this

Онлайн библиотека КнигоГид непременно порадует читателей текстами иностранных и российских писателей, а также гигантским выбором классических и современных произведений. It is not always wholesome," Jurgen submitted, "to speak of Koshchei. It seems especially undesirable in a dark place like this. None the less, I suspect it is to him you must go for justice.

Why Jurgen Did the Manly Thing. 2. Assumption of a Noted Garment. 3. The Garden between Dawn and Sunrise. 4. The Dorothy Who Did Not Understand. 5. Requirements of Bread and Butter. 6. Showing that Sereda Is Feminine. 7. Of Compromises on a Wednesday. 8. Old Toys and a New Shadow. 9. The Orthodox Rescue of Guenevere. 10. Pitiful Disguises of Thragnar. 11. Appearance of the Duke of Logreus. 12. Excursus of Yolande's Undoing. 13. Philosophy of Gogyrvan Gawr. 14. Preliminary Tactics of Duke Jurgen. 15. Of Compromises in Glathion. 16. Divers Imbroglios of King Smoit.

Author: James Cabell. JAMES BRANCH CABELL1. 1. Why Jurgen Did the Manly Thing3. Assumption of a Noted Garment4. The Garden between Dawn and Sunrise5. The Dorothy Who Did Not Understand6. Requirements of Bread and Butter7. Showing that Sereda Is Feminine8. Of Compromises on a Wednesday9. Old Toys and a New Shadow10. The Orthodox Rescue of Guenevere11. Pitiful Disguises of Thragnar12

  • Scoreboard Bleeding
I read Jurgen the first time in 1954, when I was 20 years old. and then read everything else I could find by Cabell. Since that time, he had a bit of a revival, which I followed avidly. I took pleasure in Cabell's command of language, and was drawn into his medieval world of Poictesme.

Now, I find some other works more stimulating and challenging, such as ANYTHING by Robertson Davies, or among the classics, Les Miserables, or among the fantasy writers, William Gibson. But some of Cabell, such as Domnei, and The Cream of the Jest, still stand out in my mind.
  • Coiron
It's hard to believe it, but "Jurgen" was once a cause celebre. Widely banned in the US for its randy allusions, its open publication was supported by the likes of SInclair Lewis and even philosopher George Santayana. Nowadays, it merely seems a mildly off-color but charming fable of romantic sexual fantasy versus the dour but certain reality of the married life. It is written in a drolly archaic style that was rather mannered even in the 1920s, but deeply loved by readers of that time (in some ways, Cabell was the Tolkien of the Jazz Age) and years since.

The tale tells of Jurgen, a middle-aged medieval pawnbroker who inadvertently speaks well of the Devil, and is hence rewarded with a fantasy journey that puts him in intimacy with a wide variety of great beauties of the past in worlds of Cabell's learned imagination. The running joke is that Jurgen can get away with nearly everything if he properly observes the appearance of the middle-class proprieties. Of course, in the end he finds that even the intense fantasy of Helen of Troy cannot equal the humble reality of his own home and hearth, to which he begs to return.

The language is wonderful, and quite a few of the japes are still roaringly funny. This may be the best place to begin reading Cabell, one of the 20th century's under-appreciated important writers. But I think that some of his other fantasies, such as "The High Place" and "Figures of Earth" cut much deeper. So does his non-fantasy novel, "The RIvet in Grandfather's Neck."
  • LadyShlak
So, Amazon's algorithms Katherine up with Jurgen, citing my enjoyment of any number of obscure early fantasy books. I found it enjoyable, though dense and often obscure, and I am thankful for the education afforded me that I can follow the allusions and occasional bits of Latin. There were some surprisingly risque double-entendres, and a little research reveals that Cabell was indeed prosecuted for "indecency" (he won) . . . The obscurity of the text leads me to rate it 4 stars rather than 5, but the quality of the writing itself is really first-rate!
  • Ballalune
One of my favourite books. The explicit sex is dated, so that a young reader would be baffled upon reading it and surprised to know that was what it is. But unlike explicit sex of modern porn, this serves a purpose in telling a story. The story of Jurgen I won't spoil by retelling, but it is a magnificent ride and lively with the author's voice being very playful. It is an exploration of the nature of God by one who knows of God, but does not know him personally. It is beautiful but immature. When compared to the sequel Figures of Earth, an almost identical story but told with a more mature view of love, it completes a reader's education into US fantasy novels.
  • Xal
Like many others who have written reviews, I read Jurgen long ago and was totally captivated. This hardly meant that I even came close to "totally understaning" it. In my 20's I was able to teach it and other works by Cabell. I am now in my 70's and am able to re-read the great and not so great books of my youth. My advice to new reders is just to read it and don't be intimidated by the blend of history and faantasy, the archaic and fake-archaic spellings, and the constant anagrams. Eventually some things will be clear. They are not "secret meanings," just additional layers. Enjoy, then (if it strikes you) dig more.

Jurgen is not cheap victorian porn as at least one reviewer has suggested. It is a vicious and brutal attack on the prudish and hypocrtical criticism that are as much a reality today as they were in Cabell's day. The brutal kingdom of Philistia destroys as much "evil" today as it did in Jurgen's novel.

A clue to entering Cabell's world here is his return to the garden between dawn and sunrise, where Jrgen starts his second journey through life. This dream of returning to reclaim the beauties and adventures of youth and to get a second chance may be common to all men or just to the lucky few. It was a time when the objects of our desire were not quite as beautiful as they seemed and when even our greatest adventures were not quite as great or as adventurous as they seemed then. Going back allows us to view them from the perspective of age and time, and if we have become wise, to sort them out.

Cabell ended another book (The Devil's Only Son) with one charater observing that "dreams are the disease of youth; growing up is being cured of them." Enjoy reading Jurgen. Enjoy returning to the dreams of youth. Join Cabell in the sadness that comes not from the fact that we are no longer young, but from the realization that these were just dreams. . .
  • Taun
This book was briefly notorious back in the 1920s, when a group in New York City tried to ban it as "obscene." Of course, sales exploded.

The angst was all about some very coy and sophisticated double-entendres which would have gone over the heads of most readers in any era.

All the commotion at least brought some attention to this witty and entertaining fantasy. Cabell wrote many more books in the same vein and, perhaps, began to repeat himself. But here his ideas and voice are fresh and new.

It's not for everyone, but if you're the sort who enjoys the elegant wordplay and fantastical mannerisms of writers like Nabokov or Italo Calavino, you might want to give it a try.

And, hey, in this edition, it's free.

-- J.C. Legere