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Download Eden eBook

by Phil Rossi

Download Eden eBook
ISBN:
1897492200
Author:
Phil Rossi
Category:
Science Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dragon Moon Press (November 14, 2011)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1614 kb
FB2 book:
1621 kb
DJVU:
1805 kb
Other formats
txt doc mobi docx
Rating:
4.7
Votes:
796


FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Science can't explain what is sometimes called 'magic. Magic can't explain the wonder of EDEN.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

My Other Patreon Exclusive Podcasts: Friday Flash Fiction returning in August.

Phil Rossi-writer, musician, and an embracer of "new media"-has a passion for story-telling matched only by. .

Phil Rossi-writer, musician, and an embracer of "new media"-has a passion for story-telling matched only by the pleasure he derives from keeping his fans awake at night. Crescent, Rossi's debut novel, was originally released as a podcast in 2007 and has since lured 20,000 listeners into a dark, twisted world of nightmares and things that go bump in the night. Phil Rossi's writing has been paralleled to Stephen King, Philip K. Dick, and HP Lovecraft. His the father of two little storytellers.

The tree is beautiful and they call her Eden. Phil Rossi-writer, musician, and an embracer of "new media"-has a passion for story-telling matched only by the pleasure he derives from keeping his fans awake at night.

Read Eden, by Phil Rossi online on Bookmate – The tree is beautiful and they call her Eden. The tree is beautiful and they call her Eden.

The biggest problem I have with Phil Rossi is that he is not nearly as prolific as I would have him be. He is a very talented author, and while I know him primarily from his Audio Books (Crescent, Harvey and Eden to name a few), he has great skill in the horror genre

The biggest problem I have with Phil Rossi is that he is not nearly as prolific as I would have him be. He is a very talented author, and while I know him primarily from his Audio Books (Crescent, Harvey and Eden to name a few), he has great skill in the horror genre. If you want to read a book that doesn't just give the "cheap scares" of cats jumping out of the dark, read Rossi. Crescent and Harvey kept me up nights.

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Science can't explain what is sometimes called 'magic. - Scott Sigler, New York Times best-selling author of Contagious The tree is beautiful and they call her Eden.

Read online books written by Phil Rossi in our e-reader absolutely for free. Author of Crescent at ReadAnyBook.

0 ответов 2 ретвитов 5 отметок Нравится.

"Science can't explain what is sometimes called 'magic.' Magic can't explain the wonder of EDEN."- Scott Sigler, New York Times best-selling author of Contagious The tree is beautiful and they call her Eden. Her branches reach for the stars. She is like all other trees on planet Earth save for her enormous size. Still, she has leaves and she has bark. She turns sunlight into life. But this tree does not sprout from the dirt. Eden fills the sky, high in orbit above the blue expanse of Uranus. Eden changes humanity's very concept of extraterrestrial life. Dr. Malcolm Green is sent to Eden to audit a science team studying this extraordinary tree from the dark confines of space station Lola. But with unexplainable accidents plaguing the team, tensions are mounting between scientists and custodial staff. Is there a future for this project and Lola? Only Malcolm Green can make that call. From the second he sets foot on Lola, Malcolm's own future is in jeopardy. He soon finds that love, friendship, and his own mortality tremble like a leaf at the sound of Eden's call.
  • Saberdragon
Eden was an enjoyable read, a science fiction story about a huge tree found around Uranus and the the space station personnel there studying the tree. The story focuses on Malcolm Green, biologist who arrives from Earth as the latest addition to the space station. Shortly after his arrival, mysterious accidents occur and the staff experience apparent hallucinations. The plot and characters are well developed and I found the story engaging and interesting. A few things stopped me from rating this higher:

1. The story is way too short (106 pages). I wish publishers would be more transparent about this when we purchase it. I finished it in about 45 minutes. I don't knowing the length when I purchase and it's not a great value for 2.99 (there are better ones out there).

2. The plot is a little weak on science details or description about the tree - I found myself wanting more about where it was located, how it was structured, and the like -- the description primarily focused on the bark and the leaves, which made it a little challenging to put it all into contest. Still, the author did a nice job with creativity and storyline around the tree.

3. I'd have to describe the ending as less than satisfactory -- while the author tried to resolve the primary plot, I don't feel it had a satisfactory conlusion. It was bit vague and superficial and really raised more questions than it answered. The ending wasn't completely open-ended, mind you, just a little perfunctionary for my taste.

Short and sweet, an enjoyable forty-five minute read.
  • Drelalak
I just finished this book, I could not put it down. Eden was a great story about some folks up in the deep space of our universe doing research on a huge tree. Well, other than sounding totally silly, I still had to read it. I enjoyed the story, not to many forced details but just enough so you get the idea of what is going on. I would be nuts if I was in their shoes! Anyway, it was a cliff hangar all the way up to the end which was like eating your favorite candy bar only to find a bug on the end of it inside the wrapper. It could have gone so much better. I did give it 4 stars only because I appreciated the entertainment factor of the story. I did like the story, just wish the ending was far more developed and planned out.
  • Gaeuney
I was torn on how to review this one. It really had me gripped about halfway through, and it is really a cool little story, but when I looked at other books I have given 4 stars, I didnt feel that this one quite matched up to them in terms of quality. The story itself s unique and entertaining, and quite creepy too, so if you like that sort of thing, you'll like it. My main issues were 3-fold: first, there are a lot of punctuation, spelling, and grammatical errors, so it needs a little editing. Second, the characterization was a little thin, but not terrible(Hugh Howey's "WOOL" has shown me just how much characterization you can pack into a short read), and third, the ending felt a bit rushed. All that said, I really couldn't put it down until it was over, so I would definitely reccommend this book!!
  • Direbringer
I have read the other reviews. Even the ones that criticize Phil's little short story state they couldn't put it down. Not really a horror story, not just sci/fi, it is a creep-you-out little story of how the unexplained can take over your thoughts, your life, your soul. read it. you WILL get something out of it.
  • Stylish Monkey
Eden by Phil Rossi is not as good as his other novel, "Cresent". But I still found it an interesting read. There don't seem to many horror/sci-fi novels out there for some reason.
  • Feri
An unusual premise, a well written story and one I'd recommend. I was a little disappointed in the ending and some things that weren't explained, but I did enjoy the story.
  • Ustamya
I greatly enjoyed this. Interesting concept and vivid imagery considering the length. The reviewer that referred to it as "the Lovecraft of space" is accurate.
I have been looking forward to this one for a long, long time. Even though I knew how it ended, even though 'most every word was going to be familiar. I wanted simply to read this story and not be distracted by all of the bells and whistles (very distracting and sexy and haunting bells and whistles) that accompanied its podcast version. Said podcast version being my favorite, possibly ever.

So how does the story stand up on its own?*

Marvelously.

Eden is the name the men and women working for a corporate exploiter of outer space and its resources have given to an anomaly found more or less orbiting the planet Uranus. Said anomaly being a giant (seriously giant, as in getting compared to legendary world ash tree Yggdrasl giant) tree, hanging out on its own in space, lush green leaves and all. Self-generated atmosphere and all. Undeniably compelling pull on the scientists examining it and all.

Sounds nice, doesn't it, off the wall and possibly lyrical? Which it is. But this is Phil Rossi, absolutely the H.P. Lovecraft of outer space, and things are gonna get creepy, even as they get ever more ravishing. Beauty is terror, and terror can be beautiful, sez Phil, and goes on to prove it in gorgeously descriptive, note-perfect prose.**

All of this is conveyed to us by a marvelously flawed protagonist, out to explore the tree with questionable motives, seemingly incapable of following his moral compass, curious, overwhelmed but still trying, in his fumbling but stylish way, to do what he's out there to do even as he lands right in the middle of a crappy, pre-fabricated space station in crisis. His sense of wonder and his guilt don't drive the story -- the events that unfold upon his arrival feel too inevitable -- but they suck the reader/listener in and make her feel like, or wish, she was there, even though she knows things aren't going to end well.

I already knew I was going to love it, of course.

*Not that it's ever truly on its own. I defy anyone who has ever listened to a Phil Rossi fiction podcast not to hear his growling drawl in his or her head while reading his prose. I'm pretty sure it's not possible. But I could be biased that way.

**Rossi's Lovecraftiness does not extend to his precursor's tendency to purple prose. He is Lovecraftian because he presents us with vast, impersonal, unknowable cosmic horror, dwelling in that space (ha ha!) in which incomprehension shades into madness, not because he emulates the overheated pre-modern prose style. To which I say: hooray!