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Download Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome eBook

by Christopher Pavsek,Alexander Kluge

Download Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome eBook
ISBN:
0822317354
Author:
Christopher Pavsek,Alexander Kluge
Category:
Science Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Duke University Press Books (July 24, 1996)
Pages:
128 pages
EPUB book:
1956 kb
FB2 book:
1665 kb
DJVU:
1392 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
290


Fiction writer, internationally known filmmaker, critical theorist, Alexander Kluge is perhaps postwar Germany’s most prolific and diverse intellectual. With this translation of Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome.

Fiction writer, internationally known filmmaker, critical theorist, Alexander Kluge is perhaps postwar Germany’s most prolific and diverse intellectual.

Alexander Kluge, Christopher Pavsek (Translation).

See if your friends have read any of Christopher Pavsek's books. Christopher Pavsek’s Followers. None yet. Christopher Pavsek. Christopher Pavsek’s books. The Utopia of Film: Cinema and Its Futures in Godard, Kluge, and Tahimik.

Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome. Fiction writer, internationally known filmmaker, critical theorist, Alexander Kluge is perhaps postwar Germany's most prolific and diverse intellectual.

Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome (Durham, North Carolina: Duke University Press, 1996). Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Previous versions of this entry.

Learning Process with a Deadly Outcome, translated by Christopher Pavsek, Durham, 1996. Pavsek, Christopher, "The Storyteller in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Alexander Kluge's Reworking of Walter Benjamin," in Found Object, Fall 1993. KINO-Gespräch mit Alexander Kluge," interview with A. Meyer, in KINO (Berlin), May 1974. Staunton, Denis, "Vox Appeal," in Guardian, 8 November 1993. Schulte, C. and G. Vogt, "Vorwort," in Augen-Blick (Marburg), no. 23, August 1996.

His films include The One and All (2002) and To Those Born After (2005), and he is the translator of Alexander Kluge's Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome.

Translated from the German (published as part of a collection by the same title, Lernprozesse mit Toedlichem Ausgang, Suhrkamp 1973) by Christopher Pavsek, who also provides an introduction and afterword.

Place of Publication. His films include The One and All (2002) and To Those Born After (2005), and he is the translator of Alexander Kluge's Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome. Country of Publication. Film, TV & Radio. Film and Culture Series. List of : The Idea of Cinema1. What Has Come to Pass for Cinema: From Early to Late Godard2. Kidlat Tahimik's Third World Projector 3. The Actuality of Cinema: Alexander bliographyIndex.

Fiction writer, internationally known filmmaker, critical theorist, Alexander Kluge is perhaps postwar Germany’s most prolific and diverse intellectual. With this translation of Learning Processes with a Deadly Outcome, a novella first published in German in 1973, one of Kluge’s most important literary works becomes available to an English-speaking audience for the first time. Written in a quasi-documentary style, this fascinating hybrid work combines science fiction with modernist forms of montage and reportage to describe a future in which Earth has been almost totally destroyed following the catastrophic Black War. The planet’s remaining inhabitants have been driven underground or into space where the struggle to establish a new society rages on.Whether describing the scene in China where the devastated landscape is reconstructed according to old paintings, or in the galactic realm of the Starway where giant, turf-battling, corporate colonizing forces exploit the universe’s resources, Kluge tells his tale by inventing various forms of “evidence” that satirize the discourses of administrative bureaucracy, the law, military security, and the media. He gives us some of his most bizarre and hilarious characters in this peculiar world in which the remains of the past are mixed with the most advanced elements of the future. The cast includes highly specialized women workers who have adapted to the massive gravitational field of their heavy-metal planets, a commander with lethal foot-fungus, and ex-Nazi space pioneers who, in their lonely exile from the conflagrations on earth, spend their time carving enormous facsimiles of operatic sheet music in the forests of uninhabited planets.With parody, and humor, Kluge shows how the survivors of Armageddon attempt to learn the art of civilization, and, despite the disaster they have suffered, how they set out to reproduce at new sites a caricature of a classic and fascistic feudal capitalism.