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by C. J. Cherryh

Download Forty Thousand in Gehenna (Alliance-Union Universe) eBook
ISBN:
0886774292
Author:
C. J. Cherryh
Category:
Science Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
DAW; Reissue edition (September 4, 1984)
EPUB book:
1744 kb
FB2 book:
1283 kb
DJVU:
1163 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.4
Votes:
485


Forty Thousand in Gehenna, alternately 40,000 in Gehenna, is a 1983 science fiction novel by American writer C. J. Cherryh.

Forty Thousand in Gehenna, alternately 40,000 in Gehenna, is a 1983 science fiction novel by American writer C. It is set in her Alliance-Union universe between 2354 and 2658, and is one of the few works in that universe to portray the Union side; other exceptions include Cyteen (1988) and Regenesis (2009).

The Alliance–Union universe is a fictional universe created by American writer C. It is the setting for a future history series extending from the 21st century out into the far future.

Forty Thousand in Gehenna, alternately 40,000 in Gehenna, is a 1983 novel by science fiction and fantasy author C. Cherryh

Forty Thousand in Gehenna, alternately 40,000 in Gehenna, is a 1983 novel by science fiction and fantasy author C. The science fiction novel is set in her Alliance-Union universe and is one of the few works in that universe to portray the Union side of the conflict (the other notable exception being Cyteen).

C I am partial - a long time fan of . A good stopgap novel between Cyteen and Regenesis. Offers a bit of insight into the azi mind.

J. Cherryh planned to write since the age of ten. When she was older, she learned to use a type writer while triple-majoring in Classics, Latin and Greek. At 33, she signed over her first three books to DAW and has worked with DAW ever since. I am partial - a long time fan of .

Forty Thousand in Gehenna. The Finest in. DAW Science Fiction. from C. CHERRYH: The alliance-union universe. The Era of Rapprochement. Forty thousand in gehenna.

Alliance-Union Universe Series. 16 primary works, 16 total works. Shelve Forty Thousand in Gehenna. just like real history.

Forty Thousand In Gehenna-When forty thousand human colonists are . C. When she was older, she learned to use a typewriter while triple-majoring in Classics, Latin.

Forty Thousand In Gehenna-When forty thousand human colonists are abandoned for political reasons on a planet called Gehenna, and re-supply ships fail to arrive, collapse seems imminent. Yet over the next two centuries, the descendants of the original colonists survive despite all odds by entering a partnership with the planet's native intelligence-the lizard-like, burrowing calibans. When she was older, she learned to use a typewriter while triple-majoring in Classics, Latin, and Greek.

Set in the same future as the Hugo-winning Downbelow Station, but fully self-contained, this is a story on the classic theme of human understanding of the alien.

Forty Thousand in Gehenna (Alliance-Union Universe). 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Are you sure you want to remove Forty Thousand in Gehenna (Alliance-Union Universe) from your list? Forty Thousand in Gehenna (Alliance-Union Universe). Published September 4, 1984 by DAW. Communication, Union Ministry of Defense, to US Venture. in dock at Cyteen Station. ATTN: Mary Engles, capt. Accept coded packet; navigation instructions contained herein. US CAPABLE and US SWIFT will accompany and convoy.

"Set in the same future as the Hugo-winning Downbelow Station, but fully self-contained, this is a story on the classic theme of human understanding of the alien. . . . Once again, Cherryh proves herself a consistently thoughtful and entertaining writer."--Publishers Weekly. Reissue.
  • Olma
Robert Silverberg once said that "The thing about aliens is that they're alien." C.J. Cherryh is one of the few SF writers who truly understands this. Even when her aliens are humanoid - as in the long Foreigner series - they are very different from humans, unlike the aliens of <i>Star Trek</> who are almost all nothing more than humans in heavy makeup. In <i>Forty Thousand In Gehenna</i> Cherryh is at her alien best.

The human part of the galaxy has become two different "nations" - Union and Alliance. Union plants a colony on a world the first explorers named Gehenna, though the official name is now Newport. The plan is to drop just over 40,000 citizens and azi (non-citizen cloned humans) on Gehenna to begin building the colony, with more ships in three years to bring more colonists and equipment. But what the colonists don't know is that Union has deliberately designed the colony to fail. A treaty already under negotiation will grant the area of space in which Gehenna lies to Alliance, and so that government will have to expend time and energy and resources dealing with the abandoned colony, and others in the same region, thus making easier for Union to pursue its own goals.

What no one has counted on, because no one has realized it (indeed, the scientists on Gehenna debate the matter for years) is that the native calibans aren't dumb animals. They resemble gigantic lizards, though they're not actually lizards in the same sense as lizards on Terra, and though they're alien in every way, they are intelligent. They don't speak, they don't write...but they do make patterns with pebbles or huge mounds and ridges and spirals of earth, patterns which communicate literally across the entire world. And as the abandonment of the colony leads to the breakdown first of equipment and society, some humans begin living more and more closely with the calibans.

As the generations pass, things settle down into two major communities - the towers on the Styx River, near the original settlement, and another group of towers on the Cloud River, where refugees from a caliban-human attack had fled. And the differing cultures - both human-caliban, but with some major differences (for instance, on the Styx people eat gray calibans, while on the Cloud they don't) - in the grip of the aggressiveness both of calibans and humans go to war, with literally the fate of the entire world at stake.

Meanwhile, Alliance observers have been on the planet for many years. One set of scientists gains access to the Styxside settlement, while one person, Elizabeth McGee, befriends the heir to the towers on the Cloud. These observers, going native - in McGee's case, almost against her will - and caught up in the societies they're supposed to observe, wind up in the war.

But it's McGee who comes to truly understand the communication of the patterns, and recognizes that though in outward appearance the colony has regressed to a stone age standard, in fact the humans and calibans have constructed a true civilization, one that is utterly alien to anything humans off Gehenna have ever known.

Here in <i>Forty Thousand in Gehenna</i> we have echoes, or foreshadowings is a better term, of ideas that became prominent in Cherryh's Foreigner series. What is McGee, in the end, but a <i>paidhi</i> - someone who translates not merely between different languages, but between different cultures? And though the atevi of that series resemble giant humans, they are aliens in their emotions and thoughts, just as are the calibans. It is necessary to do more than learn the language to understand either species - one must realize, in the Foreigner series, that an ateva literally <i>can't</i> like you; or in <i>Forty Thousand In Gehenna</i>, that what the ariels, gray calibans, and brown calibans do with pebbles and earth isn't just instinctual mound building, but actual communication on a global scale. Cherryh does all this masterfully. No doubt it's an illusion (of course it is - this is a work of fiction, not a documentary), but by the time you come to the end of the book, you believe that you too have come to understand patterning, at least to an extent, and that you aren't, quite, as purely human as you were in the beginning.
  • Virtual
I freely admit that this is one of my absolutely favorite books. I've read it so often that I've destroyed paperback. I've taught it in a sophomore literature course. My students were completely engaged by it. The plot is typical Cherryh: complex and full of intrigue. The characters are well-drawn and articulated. The payoff is phenomenal. Everyone I've given this book to has lauded it -- even a colleague who swears she doesn't read science fiction. Read this. Soon.
  • net rider
This book just gets better and better as you read it.
It starts somewhat slow, as most of Cherryh's books do. I would contend, however, that it only _seems_ slow as you begin to recognize the characters and the plot lines.
Cherryh leaves us with an incredibly complex book. The complexity of the book is not in the characters, nor in the plot itself. Rather, she has woven perhaps one of the most complex societies and man:man, man:environment conflicts I've ever read.
The continuing question throughout the book is debated by people removed from the situation (I won't go in to details for the sake of the prospective readers), and new details come to life as the story progresses.
What really makes this book a shining example of what a good author can do is Cherryh's creation, quite literally of the ground up, of a new race. A new society. And describing that race, and that society, at every step of the way. Not only does she create conflict and strong interactions between characters and groups of characters, but she creates a new morality, a new language, and indeed a new culture.
This book shows the talent of one of Science Fiction's most gifted authors. Highly, highly recommended. I buy this book for anyone who will read it.
  • Gavinranara
Cherryh is one of my favorite authors, so you'll need to temper my enthusiasm with that knowledge. I haven't ever read anything by her that I didn't like. And many many books (she's extremely prolific) that I absolutely loved. This is not one of her best - but it is very good. Combines science, genetics, sociology, psychology and great story telling.
The reason this isn't one of her best books is that it doesn't spend the kind of time with characters that it could. Her greatest strength is placing very real and complex characters into real and complex environments. But this book takes place over hundreds of years, and doesn't ever get deeply involved with any one or group of characters. So it doesn't shine like she typically does. But there is a greatness to this book and I recommend it to anyone who has read any Cherryh fiction. As a first exposure I'd stick to Downbelow Station, Finity's End, Merchanter's luck, or Cyteen.
  • Hi_Jacker
I am partial - a long time fan of C.J. Cherryh's. A good stopgap novel between Cyteen and Regenesis. Offers a bit of insight into the azi mind.
  • Bumand
Great book and great service!
  • Freighton
Classic C.J. Cherryh novel. One of her best.
Reread this book after many long years to find it just as fascinating as the first time. The characters are not as addicting as some in her other books, but the underlying ideas are. If you love Cyteen and Regenesis you definitely need to read this as a companion book.