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Download The Inexplicables: A Novel of the Clockwork Century eBook

by Cherie Priest

Download The Inexplicables: A Novel of the Clockwork Century eBook
ISBN:
0765329476
Author:
Cherie Priest
Category:
Science Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Tor Books; 1 edition (November 13, 2012)
Pages:
368 pages
EPUB book:
1617 kb
FB2 book:
1242 kb
DJVU:
1734 kb
Other formats
txt doc mbr lit
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
882


Cherie Priest has gotten dumped on a bit for this one, with some calling it the weakest of the Clockwork Century books. My first Cherie Priest book was Boneshaker and I thought it was fantastic.

Cherie Priest has gotten dumped on a bit for this one, with some calling it the weakest of the Clockwork Century books. I think that's a bit unfair. Even though it's clearly not the strongest entry by a long shot, I think I enjoyed its basic story (and certainly the back half) to be much more enjoyable than Clementine. I bought the Inexplicables and hoped that Cherie would continue to build upon the characters, the lore of the world she created and threads of the plot line. She did although not as aggressively as I had hoped.

Author : Cherie Priest. Genres : Science Fiction. Series : The Clockwork Century Published : November 13th 2012. It seems some outsiders have decided there’s gold to be found in the city and they’re willing to do whatever it takes to get a piece of the pie unless Rector and his posse have anything to do with it. List Chapter or Page: 1. Page 1. 2. Page 2. 3. Page 3. 4. Page 4. 5. Page 5.

In this book a young man we'd met briefly several books earlier in the Clockwork Century series . This is probably my biggest disappointment read of 2012 as I am a huge Cherie Priest fan, and I love this series.

In this book a young man we'd met briefly several books earlier in the Clockwork Century series, Rector "Wreck'em" Sherman is kicked out of the orphanage that he'd called home since the age of 2. Or at least the assumption was that he was about 2 at the time he was dropped off. Know one cue sing-song falsetto Awesome! ok, done singing now Once again Cherie Priest delivers a fully realized world, full of fully fleshed-out people (well, except for the zombies. fully engaging my imagination. This is probably my biggest disappointment read of 2012 as I am a huge Cherie Priest fan, and I love this series Until next time!

Home Cherie Priest The Inexplicables. He grew into a pallid, gangly thing, skinny like most of the refugees.

Home Cherie Priest The Inexplicables. The inexplicables, . Part of The Clockwork Century series by Cherie Priest. At first, people in the Outskirts had bartered for what they could and took ships and airships out into the Sound to fish; but within six months, Blight-poisoned rainwater meant that little would grow near the abandoned city. And many of the children-the ones like Rector, lost and recovered-were stunted by the taint of what had happened.

Электронная книга "The Inexplicables: A Novel of the Clockwork Century", Cherie Priest. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Inexplicables: A Novel of the Clockwork Century" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

The Inexplicables, November 2012, Tor Books  . Bringing Out the Undead: Cherie Priest's Eden Moore Novels Are Perfect Complements to an October Night". Retrieved February 23, 2012. ISBN 978-0-7653-2947-9. Fiddlehead, November 2013, Tor Books 'Hell's Bells,' Grant’s Pass, Morrigan Books 2009. The Catastrophe Box', a short story Son of Retro Pulp Tales, Subterranean Press 2010. Reluctance', a short story, part of "The Mammoth Book of Steampunk", first published in the UK by Robinson, an imprint of Constable & Robinson Ltd, 2012. Articles (non-fiction).

CHERIE PRIEST is the author of Four and Twenty Blackbirds; Boneshaker, the first book in the Clockwork Century series; and several other novels. She lives in Seattle, Washington.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. CHERIE PRIEST is the author of Four and Twenty Blackbirds; Boneshaker, the first book in the Clockwork Century series; and several other novels.

The third book in the Clockwork Century series, following Cherie Priest's steampunk adventure-and runaway hit .

The third book in the Clockwork Century series, following Cherie Priest's steampunk adventure-and runaway hit-Boneshaker and its sequel, Dreadnought The air pirate Andan Cly is going straight. If only it hadn't killed most of the men who'd ever set foot inside it. But it's those "if onlys" that will decide whether Cly and his crew will end up in the history books, or at the bottom of the ocean. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Stonewall Jackson survived Chancellorsville. This is the Clockwork Century. It is dark here, and different

Stonewall Jackson survived Chancellorsville. England broke the Union’s naval blockade, and formally recognized the Confederate States of America. It is dark here, and different. Part One: Hunkered shoulders and skinny, bent knees cast a crooked shadow from the back corner of the laboratory, where the old man tried to remember the next step in his formula, or possibly–as Edwin was forced to consider–the scientist simply struggled to recall his own name. On the table against the wall, the once estimable Dr. Archibald Smeeks muttered, spackling his test tubes with spittle and becoming increasingly agitated until Edwin called out, Doctor?

Rector tried to keep up, and he tried to respond when a response was called for; but the underground was full of stairs.

Rector tried to keep up, and he tried to respond when a response was called for; but the underground was full of stairs. Surely thousands of them, maybe just in the. And since people don’t just fall their way underground, unless they’re being chased by long-armed monsters and happen to land in a chuckhole, the residents put in stairs. That was fine-even sensible-but Rector would’ve given anything to stumble upon one of the elevators Houjin mentioned in passing.

Rector "Wreck ‘em" Sherman was orphaned as a toddler in the Blight of 1863, but that was years ago. Wreck has grown up, and on his eighteenth birthday, he'll be cast out out of the orphanage.

And Wreck's problems aren't merelyabout finding a home. He's been quietly breaking the cardinal rule of any good drug dealer and dipping into his own supply of the sap he sells. He's also pretty sure he's being haunted by the ghost of a kid he used to know―Zeke Wilkes, who almost certainly died six months ago. Zeke would have every reason to pester Wreck, since Wreck got him inside the walled city of Seattle in the first place, and that was probably what killed him.Maybe it's only a guilty conscience, but Wreck can't take it anymore, so he sneaks over the wall.

The walled-off wasteland of Seattle is every bit as bad as he'd heard, chock-full of the hungry undead and utterly choked by the poisonous, inescapable yellow gas. And then there's the monster. Rector's pretty certain that whatever attacked him was not at all human―and not a rotter, either. Arms far too long. Posture all strange. Eyes all wild and faintly glowing gold and known to the locals as simpley "The Inexplicables."

In the process of tracking down these creatures, Rector comes across another incursion through the wall―just as bizarre but entirely attributable to human greed. It seems some outsiders have decided there's gold to be found in the city and they're willing to do whatever it takes to get a piece of the pie unless Rector and his posse have anything to do with it.

  • Uste
I've lost track of what volume number in the Clockwork Century Series The Inexplicables represents, but the mind, and pen, of Cherie Priest delivers this installment in a way that is still refreshing. The usual cast of characters is there, plus a new teen protagonist. If this is your first venture into this alternate late nineteenth century, shame on you for not discovering it sooner! No worries, though, as there are enough mild explanations as to who the cast of characters are that you should be up to date in no time. For veterans of this blight filled Seattle, there is more history of revealed.

Perhaps because this story comes back inside Seattle, I felt The Inexplicables was the strongest since the original Clockwork Century novel, Boneshaker. The big twist here, without giving away too much, was a guest appearance by Sasquatch. While some may argue that the Sasquatch related elements could be removed without influencing the plot, I have a distinct feeling this character will be back. I've come to appreciate Ms Priest's storytelling and don't think she would introduce such an element unless there was a really good reason to bring that character in.

I am also coming to appreciate some of the underlying social commentary that runs through this Time That Never Was. In addition to advancing the Good Guys vs Bad Guys plot, we have a story of redemption. Rector Sherman, the newest character, lives in an orphanage and makes money on the side selling "Sap" . . . when he's not sampling from his latest batch. When we meet Rector, he is at the end of his time in the orphanage and possibly near the end of his life because of the drug usage. Through support of friends he finds physical redemption and by the time we leave him, he is well on the road to physical recovery. My compliments to the author for getting this across, without having to hit the reader over the head with this moral, while still advancing the rest of the plot.

The action is well paced and the dialog is well done. The development of the main characters is very well done. The flaws lie in the development of secondary characters. For the most part, they are confined to the wings: they are talked about, but there is no real history revealed about them and not much development of these secondary characters. While the science may be somewhat flawed, you just need to remind yourself, this is Steampunk. Science is reinvented and reconceived as needed to fit the times.

Despite these misgivings, The Inexplicables is thoroughly enjoyable and a welcome addition to the Clockwork Century. Overall, I'll go four stars for this work. If you're a fan of this series, you need it for your collection. If you are new to Steampunk, the American twist is refreshing.

(Review Originally Published on Librarything)
  • Gna
Cherie Priest has gotten dumped on a bit for this one, with some calling it the weakest of the Clockwork Century books. I think that's a bit unfair. Even though it's clearly not the strongest entry by a long shot, I think I enjoyed its basic story (and certainly the back half) to be much more enjoyable than Clementine. That still remains the weakest entry for me.

That said, I think most people have issue with the main character, Rector. He's a whiny, angsty teenager with a drug addiction. This isn't a coming of age story, though. It's a redemption story. I applaud Cherie Priest for writing a protagonist that isn't likable from the word go and turning him into someone who eventually is. She's written her fair share of anti-hero protagonists, but all of them had a certain rogue charm as soon as the reader is introduced to them. Rector doesn't. His utter lack of charm as a thief and junkie makes the first few chapters of the book a big of a slog, but it creates a real arc for the character that moves slowly and has a payoff.

I enjoyed returning to the Blighted Seattle of Boneshaker (which will still remain an epic that's head and shoulders above everything else in Clockwork Century except for maybe Ganymede) and seeing all of the characters introduced in many of the previous volumes work together to take out a new series of threats to their poisoned but hard-earned city. Definitely a worthy volume to read if you're into the series, but I certainly wouldn't start here. You will be lost and perplexed. Definitely start with Boneshaker.
  • MarF
My first Cherie Priest book was Boneshaker and I thought it was fantastic. I can almost smell the movie rights now....

I bought the Inexplicables and hoped that Cherie would continue to build upon the characters, the lore of the world she created and threads of the plot line. She did although not as aggressively as I had hoped.

Don't get me wrong, the book was still a solid "A". I really enjoyed it although I read it in a little under two days. Yes, I am a college educated 47 year old so digesting this shouldn't be a stretch.

I liked Boneshaker so much I actually re-read parts of it. Throughout the Boneshaker I thought the imagery was so rich I thought of the Harry Potter series and JK Rowlings ability to paint a scene within my imagination. I liked Boneshaker that much.

The Inexplicables was not far off from that however it built upon some characters that were introduced in Boneshaker and cleaned up in the aftermath of the war and Dr. Minnericht plus further definition of the blight and some of its long term effects.

Did I like it? Absolutely. It had some well designed action and further detailed out the steam punk Seattle that Ms. Priest has so beautifully laid out. After I read it I wanted a little bit more though. I liked the angle of the blight getting out although the whole idea of the capture and illicit use of the blight got tiresome after a while. It became a drug war with zombies playing a bit part and the real bad guys being other drug manufacturers. Good villains no doubt but short lived ones at best.

So was it a good read? 100%. Was it as good as Boneshaker? Not quite. Would I still buy and read it? Absolutely. Was it fun. Unequivocally yes.