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Download Home is the Hunter (Star Trek, No 52) eBook

by Dana Kramer-Rolls

Download Home is the Hunter (Star Trek, No 52) eBook
ISBN:
0671666622
Author:
Dana Kramer-Rolls
Category:
Science Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Pocket Books (December 1, 1990)
EPUB book:
1619 kb
FB2 book:
1819 kb
DJVU:
1389 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
585


Home is the Hunter" is truly one of the better written Star Trek numbered novels.

Home is the Hunter" is truly one of the better written Star Trek numbered novels. One side note, this being a pre-warp culture, why were they there?). looking for something different? By Thriftbooks. com User, December 10, 1999. I am an avid Star Trek reader. This book is an excellent choice for someone looking for a book with the support characters featured. I Liked the time travel theme, but with a new twist.

Home is the Hunter (Star Trek, No 52. I think Ms. Kramer-Rolls would have been wise to drop one of the book's main story threads, preferably Chekov's WW2 adventures.

Home is the Hunter (Star Trek, No 52). ISBN. 0785751203 (ISBN13: 9780785751205). HOME IS THE HUNTER is set right after the events of STAR TREK: THE MOTION PICTURE, but it feels like an episode from the original show. It is entertaining, cheesy as hell, and ultimately pretty forgettable. Four separate timelines is simply too much, especially when three of the four have no impact on how the plot gets resolved.

Home Is the Hunter is a Star Trek: The Original Series novel written by Dana Kramer-Rolls. Captain Kirk, commanding the USS Enterprise, gets into a fight with a Klingon ship concerning arguments over a primitive planet and its inhabitants. A mysterious, powerful entity named 'Weyland' stops the fight and decides to punish three of the Enterprise crew with their own history.

Home Is the Hunter is a Star Trek novel, the 52nd book in the numbered series of TOS novels published by Pocket Books. This volume was written by Dana Kramer-Rolls and released in December 1990. A dispute over a planet and its primitive people leads Captain Kirk and a Klingon commander to pit their ships against each other in battle. But the fight is stopped by a mysterious and powerful alien being named Weyland, who decides to punish three Enterprise crewmembers with their own history.

Used availability for Dana Kramer-Rolls's Home Is the Hunter. November 1990 : USA Mass Market Paperback. November 1990 : UK Paperback.

Home Is the Hunter - Dana Kramer Rolls.

Episode 35: The Best of the Weird: There are good Star Trek episodes, there are bad Star Trek episodes. There are forgettable Star Trek episodes, and then there are the just plain weird ones. Home Is the Hunter - Dana Kramer Rolls.

Home is the Hunter by Dana Kramer-Rolls (Paperback, 1990). Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition

Home is the Hunter by Dana Kramer-Rolls (Paperback, 1990). Good Condition: A book that has been read, but is in good condition. Minimal damage to the book cover eg. scuff marks, but no holes or tears. If this is a hard cover, the dust jacket may be missing. Binding has minimal wear. The majority of pages are undamaged with some creasing or tearing, and pencil underlining of text, but this is minimal. No highlighting of text, no writing in the margins, and no missing pages.

by. Kramer-Rolls, Dana. Kirk, James T. (Fictitious character), Spock (Fictitious character), McCoy, Leonard (Fictitious character), Interplanetary voyages, Science fiction, American, Star Trek fiction. New York : Pocket Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Book of Star Trek: The Original Series. By Dana Kramer Rolls. But the fight is stopped by a mysterious and powerful alien being named Weyland, who decides to punish three EnterpriseĀ™ crewmembers with their own history. He places Sulu in feudal Japan during the period's most important and bloody power struggle, Scotty in 18th century Scotland on the eve of revolt, and Chekov in WWII Russia.

A dispute over a planet and its primitive people leads Captain Kirk and a Klingon Commander to pit their ships against each other in battle. But the fight is stopped by a mysterious and powerful alien being named Weyland, who decides to punish three Enterprise crewmembers with their own history. He places Sulu in feudal Japan during the period's most important and bloody power struggle, Scotty in 18th century Scotland on the eve of revolt, and Chekov in WWII Russia.

Now, the three time travelers must face overwhelming dangers as they are pulled by conflicting forces: their allegiance to their homelands, their duty to the Federation they serve, and the demands of history.

  • Kinashand
Great story where members of the Enterprise crew are thrown into their historical past facing impossible odds.

Sulu in medieval Japan and Chekov in World War II Russia face challenging situations.

I highly recommend this book to fans of the original series.
  • Gathris
Very good book
  • Hiylchis
I hesitated to read this one based on the descriptions, but after doing so must admit that it was both breezy and entertaining. If it had only included more Spock and Uhura, I would've rated it 5 stars, and declared it worthy of a feature film. Without them, it feels like a missing episode of Phase II, but that's not a bad thing.

I was worried that the time travel and emphasis on Sulu, Chekov, and Scotty would detract, but Kirk features prominently enough in the story, which splices Errand of Mercy (Klingon intrigue) with a Q-like tale. The book shifts so rapidly between time periods that it never gets old; we're talking 3-4 pages between shifts so nothing gets too bogged down, plus I could imagine the TMP-era characters extremely well, especially Mr. Scott with the moustache and salt & pepper hair.

I read it right after Ex Machina (an awesome direct sequel to TMP), Unseen Enemy (a fair who dunnit aboard the refit Enterprise), and The Kobayashi Maru (which also focused on Kirk, Scott, Chekov, and Sulu), and while I've yet to find the ultimate Trek from the second 5-year mission era, they've all been enjoyable thus far.
  • Andromathris
"Home is the Hunter" is truly one of the better written Star Trek numbered novels. The premise: The Enterprise is dispatched to Cragon V in order to compete with the Klingons over mineral rights. (One side note, this being a pre-warp culture, why were they there?). Once the Enterprise arrives they discover that the Klingons have been there for sometime and have been giving the locals some weapons and combat training. They also discover that they have to wait for the world leader, Weyland to get a decision as to who gets the mineral rights. Weyland himself is an interesting creature. Since this classic trek novel was published in October of 1990, the author obviously had been watching Star Trek The Next Generation and has come up with a creature who seems to be of the Q Continuum, but without blatantly stating he is. While on the planet, Captain Kirk, his crew and the Klingons finally meet with Weyland. The meeting doesn't go well for either side and they decide to depart. A skirmish begins between the opposing sides and an innocent child is killed along with a one of the Starfleet officers. Thus begets Weyland's reasoning behind disabling both the Enterprise and the Klingon vessel. He also hurls three of Captain Kirk's crew into the past. Scotty finds himself in Scotland in the year 1746. Sulu is in Japan in the year 1600 and Chekov is in Russia in the year 1942. Along with Scotty, Chekov and Sulu being thrown back in time, there is a very good story going on between Kirk and the Klingons. The Klingons seemed slightly out of character for Klingons. But not to worry, their characterizations only go slightly off the trail as far as how they are perceived as a culture.
As stated above, this is a wonderfully well written and thought out novel. The only odd thing about this is the author him or herself. It seems out of all of the Star Trek novels written, this seems to be the only one with this individuals name on it. Such a shame, she or he writes very well. Thank you once again to Chapulina R for the reading suggestion.
  • Mavivasa
Here is one of the few Star Trek novels I recommend reading. Like "The Final Reflection", it is not typical Trekkie fare. This fast-paced but intricate adventure begins with a dispute between the Federation and Klingon Empire for possession of Cragon V, a remote, mineral-rich planet. Little do Captains Kirk and Kral know that an omnipotent being from an unknown and unnamed Continuum has appointed himself "god" of Cragon's primitive population. Disdainful of the barbarism of the two 23rd-century powers, the capricious deity throws both of their ships into peril and their crews into chaos. For extra measure, he hurls Sulu, Scotty, and Chekhov into the distant pasts of their ancestral Terran homelands. He then amuses himself by observing how these lower life-forms will acquit themselves under their severely trying circumstances. This Trek novel distinguishes itself by its well-researched historical settings, as Sulu finds himself a Samurai in feudal Japan, Scott a Keltic clansman battling the British, and Chekhov a Soviet airman in the Battle of Stalingrad. At first desirous only of returning to the Enterprise, all three time-refugees become immersed in their warrior roles and the moral choices they are forced to make. Meanwhile, Kral and his courageous consort Vladra must survive a mutiny, then somehow form an alliance with Kirk to convince the Omnipotent One of their respective species' capacity for honor. "Home Is The Hunter" is outstanding among Trek novels for its characterizations, particularly those of Scotty, Chekhov, and Sulu, who are too often overlooked in favor of the "Big Three". Unfortunately, Uhura is almost completely ignored in this story. Personally, I wish she had also been sent time-traveling. She probably would have found herself among the Dahomeyan Amazons facing the French Foreign Legion!