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by Harry Harrison

Download Star Smashers/galaxy eBook
ISBN:
0441783619
Author:
Harry Harrison
Category:
Science Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ace (July 1, 1983)
EPUB book:
1748 kb
FB2 book:
1924 kb
DJVU:
1431 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.9
Votes:
258


Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers is a 1973 comic science fiction novel by American writer Harry Harrison. It is a parody of the space opera genre and in particular, the Lensman and Skylark series of E. E. "Doc" Smith.

Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers is a 1973 comic science fiction novel by American writer Harry Harrison. The main characters are homages to Tom Swift Jr. and his buddy, Bud Barclay. It also includes a homage to Larry Niven's Ringworld (1970).

Harry Harrison was born in Stamford, Connecticut in 1925 and lived in New York City until 1943, when he joined the United States Army. He was a machine-gun instructor during the war, but returned to his art studies after leaving the army

Harry Harrison was born in Stamford, Connecticut in 1925 and lived in New York City until 1943, when he joined the United States Army. He was a machine-gun instructor during the war, but returned to his art studies after leaving the army.

Harry Harrison was born Henry Maxwell Dempsey in Connecticut, in 1925. He is the author of a number of much-loved series including the Stainless Steel Rat and Bill the Galactic Hero sequences and the Deathworld Trilogy.

Star Smashers of the Galaxy Rangers' makes Harrison's Stainless Steel Rat series look staid and sensible. It's so typically and unapologetically Harry Harrison that there's not any way to rate this book. It was fun, it was stupid, the amazing coincidences were there. It is an absurd parody of space adventures, starring two handsome and athletic young men of great scientific genius, a spy turned good, and a constantly put-upon young woman called Sally. After inadvertently inventing a super-weapon of astounding destructive power, the heroic four go A dear friend recommended this book as cheering when one is feeling under the weather.

v. Initial release - Kronos v. Removed extra linebreaks resulting in 1 line per paragraph, added blank line between paragraphs. Harry Harrison was born in Stamford, Connecticut in 1925 and lived in New York City until 1943, when he joined the United States Army.

I loved this book as a teenager in High School. It was a very hard book to put down. Very entertaining, funny and full of fast paced sci-fi action.

Harry Harrison6 januari 2015. BenBella Books, Inc. Toevoegen aan verlanglijstje. When the two college students develop a faster-than-light space drive in their homemade workshed, they decide to sneak it aboard their football team's airplane as a prank.

  • Tcaruieb
I originally read this in high school. Ran across "Barlowe's Guide to Extraterrestrials" which reminded me of it. Very dated now (the commie reds are the big threat). But it is a great parody of its genre and a lot of fun... especially the last few paragraphs. Should totally be brought to the big screen - would be a great cult classic!
  • Fato
Never a dull minute. It made you wonder what would be coming next. Didn't really like the ending but we all can't be writers
  • huckman
I split my sides laughing.
  • Adoranin
Disjointed
  • xander
Ok, I am a great fan of Harry Harrison. I think he's a magnificent author. But, this book, is the biggest piece of trash I have read. I have a version printed in 1976, copyrighted in 1973 and it reads like something from the 1940s in attitude, content and style. If it's supposed to be serious, it's not, because you can't take it seriously; if it's supposed to be funny, it also misses the mark. If I wanted people to become fans of Harry Harrison and his work, I would steer them away from this book. I can not imagine what anyone was thinking to suggest this be reprinted again in the 2000s.
  • Rocky Basilisk
Yes it IS a parody, But what a parody! This has everything you could wish for if you grew up with Tom Swift, Tom Swift and His Flying Lab (The New Tom Swift Jr. Adventures No. 1) eagerly awaiting the next book; discovered E. E. Smith The Skylark of Space and eagerly awaited HIS next book; while at the same time absorbing all of the rest of science fiction at the maximum rate of intake! This is E. E. Smith in the Style of Victor Appleton! The star of the story is the Flying Lab (I loved that plane - exactly the same size as a Lockheed C-5A or a 747, but VTOL - and 10 years earlier!). The unexpected discovery of the space drive (X = cheese!?!) just like Skylark Of Space. The exponential escalation of the technology (each new alien species, no matter how horrible looking, becomes good buddies and speaks English with a British accent, and contributes the next order of magnitude of power, which the boys incorporate into the plane in a few minutes.) It has Tom Swift's loyal old negro janitor (who turns out to be a KGB physicist spy) who becomes one of the heroes of the story. It has the stereotypical girl cheerleader who tags along and faints or is captured by monstrous tentacled aliens at all of the right places. One of my favorite books was Spacehounds Of IPC Spacehounds of IPC, where the chain of engineering challenges probably affected my attitude toward engineering and my life career choices. There is an homage to that slice of ship as one of the alien allies is rescued from just such a slice. There are the immortal, wise, alien observers of the Lensman series. First Lensman (The Lensman Series, Book 2) And of course the evil, telepathically controlling alien bad guys that no one had ever seen! The masterful conclusion brought thousands of alien races and thousands of allied spaceships all together at... Hula Hoop World! Ringworld

You either don't get or you will love it. It not only needs to be in print again; there needs to be a movie!
  • The_NiGGa
I am prompted to write because I just finished reading a comparable book, Douglas Adams' Hitch Hikers' Guide to the Galaxy, after hearing the radio shows many years ago. THHGTTG doesn't make its way into prose very well, and seems really dated.
By contrast, Harrison's is really sharp satire, and he uses the liberties that science fiction gives him to make his points with great force and absurd humour.
If we discover a species is stupider than we first thought, can we eat them? Who should one side with in a war; a cruel democracy or a kind dictatorship? And when does hero-worship cross the line into homoeroticism?
Harrison raises issues of politics, racism, sexism and a thousand other touchy subjects in a hilarious and outrageous book.
The galaxy's star-fleet being led by a souped-up 747 is a delightful image which sticks in my mind from this book.
Oh, and I think Harrison raided his legal textbooks to name the aliens. A garnishee is a claim you can make over someone's wages or property, and Lord Percy was an English Judge.
This book deserves to be in print again....and, especially, tobe made into a high-budget movie.
This is one funny, funny, enjoyable book. A farcical take off on silly space operas, the action is wild, the characters hilariously idiotic, the settings imaginitive, and one of my favorite all-time endings.
But it's even funnier if you've read the grand old space operas of E.E. "Doc" Smith. This is a dead-on satire of Smith's most famous works, the "Lensman" and "Skylark" series. Harrison gets in all of Smith's trademarks: The hysterical prose, the cliffhanger chapter endings, the amazing BEMs, the questionalbe science, the all-American cardboard idiocy of the heroes, the vapidity of the heroines, the simplistic black-and-white morality, the wonderful and imaginitive settings, the jingonistic patriotism, the nonstop action, even Smith's love of a good steak. If you've read any of Smith's work (and possibly if you haven't), you'll laugh until you wet your pants.
Good hunting! Copies are kind of rare, so start now!