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Download Lying in Weight: The Hidden Epidemic of Eating Disorders in Adult Women eBook

by Trisha Gura PhD

Download Lying in Weight: The Hidden Epidemic of Eating Disorders in Adult Women eBook
ISBN:
0060761482
Author:
Trisha Gura PhD
Category:
Diets & Weight Loss
Language:
English
Publisher:
Harper; 1 edition (May 1, 2007)
Pages:
384 pages
EPUB book:
1251 kb
FB2 book:
1211 kb
DJVU:
1814 kb
Other formats
doc mbr azw mobi
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
993


In the United States, binge eating is estimated at 4 million people.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. In truth, twenty-five to thirty million American women twenty-five and older suffer from serious food issues, from obsessions with calorie counting to compulsions to starve then overeat.

Trisha Gura, PhD13 October 2009. Sold by Harper Collins. These diseases often linger from adolescence or emerge anew in the lives of adult women in ways that we are only now starting to recognize.

Lying in Weight book.

In truth, twenty-five to thirty million American women twenty-five and older suffer from serious food issues, from obsessions with calorie counting to compulsions to starve then overeat.

Автор: Gura Trisha Название: Lying in Weight: The Hidden .

Mobile version (beta). Download (pdf, . 2 Mb) Donate Read. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

In the United States, binge eating is estimated at 4 million people. It is a type of emotional eating, having to do with feeling bad. Of those who binge, 40% are men and 60% are women. This book is a honest inside look of adult women suffering in silence.

A girl with an eating disorder grows up. And then what?

In this groundbreaking new book, science journalist Trisha Gura, Ph.D., explodes the myth that those who suffer from eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, are primarily teenage girls. In reality, these diseases linger from adolescence or emerge anew in the lives of adult women in ways that we are only starting to recognize.

Millions of American women twenty-five and older suffer from serious food issues, from obsessions with calorie counting to compulsions to starve then overeat. Because of the assumption that age provides eating-disordered immunity, the medical and mental health communities have long overlooked these women and minimized their dangerous habits. Yet the number of women in their thirties, forties, and older now seeking treatment is double and triple that of five years ago. The growing awareness of this understudied population is raising relevant questions: How does an adult woman's eating disorder affect her choice of a husband—or his choice of her? How does she cope with her expanding body during pregnancy? How does she feed her children when she cannot properly feed herself? And how does she weather aging in a culture that informs all women that they can never be too old to be too thin?

Drawing on her own experience with anorexia, the most up-to-date research, and extensive interviews with clinicians and sufferers, Gura addresses these concerns and concludes that eating disorders, at least some vestigeof them, tend to lie dormant throughout a woman's life. Eating disorders in adults may not replicate those of adolescents and tend to emerge at the most vulnerable periods in a woman's life—marriage, the birth of a child, stress from child rearing, marital difficulties, depression, and menopause. Though the media may tell us that the girl with an eating disorder overcomes her demons with age and hard work, the reality is that she often doesn't. A girl with an eating disorder is a woman prone to relapse.

Lying in Weight is a startling, timely, and imperative investigation of eating disorders "all grown up." Women are suffering from a hidden, horrid, and life-threatening epidemic. This book is a shot across the bow to confront the problem and address the real issues. Isn't it time to end the suffering?

  • Hellmaster
"Lying In Weight" is a well written book about eating disorders in adult women. I was thrilled to find this book as most books on eating disorders refer to children, teenagers and college age women. Finally, a book I can relate to. It breaks the adult years down into stages and tells how eating disorders affect each stage. I've read a lot of books on eating disorders. I came away with new information and advice. This book is very insightful. I highly recommend it to other adults suffering with eating disorders as well as family members who are trying to understand.
  • black coffe
Lying in Weight exposes the myth that eating disorders are time-limited ones that resolve themselves when a woman leaves the battleground of adolescence. Although eating disorders tend to have their roots in adolescence, the author convincingly argues how "An eating disorder can fit into any part of development and slowly but powerfully disrupt proper development of the whole."

A main theme of this book is that when the key psychosocial developmental milestones have not been achieved, women are more vulnerable to eating disorders during stressful life transitions. In particular, the adolescent who does not develop a solid identity is at increased risk for an eating disorder when life stresses arise during her young adulthood, pregnancy, parenting, and older adulthood phases of life. This book provides a wealth of information, understanding, and insight as to how the "latent beast" of eating disorders can surface throughout the lifespan. And, equally as important, Lying in Weight provides hope that with therapy, commitment, and resiliency, recovery is possible: for the 16 year-old struggling with anorexia, for the 65 year-old battling bulimia, and for everyone else in between.
  • Gralmeena
This is one of several new books on eating disorders in adult women (as opposed to children and teenagers). The author speaks with an authentic voice and gives real examples of women who have come face-to-face with eating disorders. She makes no false promises about recovery, but gives suggestion on what someone who has one of these terrible diseases can do to improve their life. Gura also looks at the husbands/partners in an eating disordered woman's life and differentiates them by personality type.

Perhaps the most chilling statistic is the "rule of thirds": one third of women with eating disorders will recover completely, one third will never recover, and one third will achieve partial recovery. That's either two-to-one for improvement, or two-to-one against recovery. Take your pick.

Even so, her writing is eloquent, and she speaks from a place of knowledge. She doesn't sugar coat the facts.
  • BoberMod
This is a well written book that covers a topic not often seen in this spectrum - adult women with eating disorders. The author is thorough and covers important life events (marriage, divorce, pregnancy, child rearing, aging.)
However, the introduction foreshadows a lot of what is to come. First, she reveals that she herself suffered from anorexia and considers herself to currently suffer from a "sub-threshold" eating disorder. She also reveals that she does not believe one can be "fully recovered" from an eating disorder -- something i vehemently disagree with. (However, I still found the book helpful).
The life events covered in the book were events she struggled with. It didn't cover others such as, say, dating, disease, death of loved ones, etc. I also felt that it labeled "adult" as "one who is married with a child." In the eating disorder world, i would classify 'adult' or 'sub-threshold' age as post-college. But this is yet another example of her bias.

I read this in one weekend, as it was a very compelling read. Though I disagreed with some of the content and the message that one can only go as far as being in "remission" from an eating disorder, I'm glad that the curtain has been drawn from the lie that one is miraculously healed from an eating disorder once graduated from college.
  • Runemane
From: [...]
Author & Book Views On A Healthy Life!

Book Review: Lying In Weight by Trisha Gura, Ph.D.

In the United States, binge eating is estimated at 4 million people. It is a type of emotional eating, having to do with feeling bad. Of those who binge, 40% are men and 60% are women. Being an eating disorder practiced in secret, it is linked to obesity and subjects are difficult to locate for interviews.

Trisha Gura, Ph.D., the author of Lying In Weight, explains that bingeing is eating within a two-hour period, "an amount of food that is definitely larger than most people would eat during a similar period and under similar circumstances." Often feelings of uncontrolled eating regarding amount of food or type of food accompany the binge. Ms. Gura goes on to state that these episodes can be identified with three or more of the following markers:

1. Eating much more rapidly than normal

2. Eating until feeling uncomfortable full

3. Eating large amounts of food when not feeling physically hungry

4. Eating alone because of being embarrassed by how much one is eating

5. Feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or very guilty after overeating

Practiced over time, the disorder becomes addictive. Binge eating often is found hand-in-hand with depression, anxiety, and other mood disorders. Find treatment.

Lying In Weight explores anorexia, bulimia, and other eating disorders as well as bingeing.

5 Stars