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Download Urban Girls: Resisting Stereotypes, Creating Identities eBook

by Bonnie J. Leadbeater,Niobe Way

Download Urban Girls: Resisting Stereotypes, Creating Identities eBook
ISBN:
0814751075
Author:
Bonnie J. Leadbeater,Niobe Way
Category:
Psychology & Counseling
Language:
English
Publisher:
NYU Press (June 1, 1996)
Pages:
410 pages
EPUB book:
1431 kb
FB2 book:
1484 kb
DJVU:
1982 kb
Other formats
docx lrf mbr mobi
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
401


Bonnie J. Leadbeater is Professor of Psychology at the University of Victoria and co-author, with Niobe Way, of Urban Girls and of Growing up Fast.

Bonnie J.

Sexual Harassment and Masculinity: The Power and Meaning of Girl Watching. Gender & Society, 16(3), 386-402. Quirk, . & Lelliot, P. (2002). Acute wards: Problems and solutions. A participant observation study of life on an acute psychiatric ward. Psychiatric Bulletin, 26(9), 344-345. Rademakers, J. J. D. van den Muijsenbergh, M. E. T. Slappendel, . Lagro-Janssen, A. L. & Borleffs, J. C. (2008). Ross Leadbeater & Niobe Way (Ed. . New York: New York University Press. 408 pp. ISBN 0-8147-5108-3.

Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. On the Relation Between Sociology and Ethics. Eviction and the Reproduction of Urban Poverty. Leadbeater, Niobe Wa. Leadbeater, Niobe Way. NYU Press, 12 февр. and her award-winning Growing up Fast: Transitions to Adulthood among Inner-City Adolescent Mothers (Erlbaum Press, 2001).

Leadbeater, Bonnie J. Ross, 1950-; Way, Niobe, 1963-.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Urban Girls: Resisting Stereotypes, Creating Identities as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Urban girls: Resisting stereotypes, creating identities. BJ Leadbeater, BJR Leadbeater, N Way. NYU Press, 1996. Quality of mother–toddler interactions, maternal depressive symptoms, and behavior problems in preschoolers of adolescent mothers. BJ Leadbeater, SJ Bishop, CC Raver. Developmental Psychology 32 (2), 280, 1996.

Urban Girls: Resisting Stereotypes, Creating Identities," on the development of urban poor and working-class adolescent girls. Including both quantitative and qualitative essays, as well as contributions from psychologists, sociologists, and public health scholars, this volume explores the lives of girls from diverse ethnic and class backgrounds. Topics covered include identity development, the role of racism and sexism in development, parent and peer relationships, sexuality, and health risks.

In this book the authors examine in depth the lives of inner-city adolescent mothers, going beyond stereotypes to illuminate the diverse pathways to young adulthood taken by these young women. The different ways they respond to becoming a parent reflect a range of abilities, aspirations, and supports. Their often-creative solutions to living in poverty, the intensity of their desires to make their children's lives better, the height of their youthful ambition when they succeed, and the depth of their pain when they fail, all show a surprising range.

Sociologists have tried to analyze adolescents as long as the discipline has existed. However, most studies have focused on suburban youth, ignoring a large segment of the population, the urban adolescent.

Urban Girls tries to reverse this trend. The researchers included in this ambitious project realize there is more to adolescence than the suburban experience. The city has unique effects on the people who live there, and they on it. Drawing on experts from across the country, Urban Girls investigates what it is like to be young in an American city. This book also explores the minority experience in America. It is wonderful to see studies of Black and Latina youth that do not automatically label them as future convicts, drug dealers, or with other negative stereotypes.--The American Reporter

Traditional psychology textbooks have ignored the normative development of urban girls and the unique situations they face on a daily basis. Lumped together with their suburban, mostly white and middle class counterparts, their voices are frequently subsumed within the larger study of adolescent development. Urban Girls is the first book to directly focus on the development of urban poor and working class adolescent girls.

Including both quantitative and qualitative essays, and including contributions from psychologists, sociologists, and public health scholars, this volume explores the lives of a diverse group of girls from varying ethnic and class backgrounds. Topics covered include the identity development of Caribbean-American girls, the role of truth telling in the psychological development of African-American girls, relationships between mothers and daughters of different races and ethnicities, friendships, sexuality, health risks, career development, and other subjects of importance to human development. Filling a gap in the literature of human development, Urban Girls is sure to be of use to psychologists, sociologists, and social workers.