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Download Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers: A Jungian Guide Through the Paradoxes of Peace, Conflict and Love That Mark a Lifetime eBook

by Bud Harris

Download Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers: A Jungian Guide Through the Paradoxes of Peace, Conflict and Love That Mark a Lifetime eBook
ISBN:
1453736778
Author:
Bud Harris
Category:
Psychology & Counseling
Language:
English
Publisher:
CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (December 19, 2010)
Pages:
210 pages
EPUB book:
1858 kb
FB2 book:
1100 kb
DJVU:
1383 kb
Other formats
doc lit azw txt
Rating:
4.2
Votes:
512


Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers: A Jungian Guide Through the Paradoxes of Peace, Conflict and Love That Mark a Lifetime Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers: A Jungian Guide Through the Paradoxes of. Peace, Conflict and Love That Mark a Lifetime READ Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers: A Jungian Guide Through the Paradoxes of Peace, Conflict and Love That Mark a Lifetime.

The message in Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers is that the more conscious we become of the personal patterns, the . Bud Harris defines himself as a husband, a father, grandfather, psychologist and Jungian analyst

Bud Harris defines himself as a husband, a father, grandfather, psychologist and Jungian analyst. Early in his life he earned a bachelor’s degree in management from Georgia Tech in Atlanta Georgia.

Answers : A Jungian Guide Through the Paradoxes of Peace, Conflict and Love That Mark a Lifetime

Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers : A Jungian Guide Through the Paradoxes of Peace, Conflict and Love That Mark a Lifetime. Bud Harris is a lantern on the path - clear eyed, big hearted, and illuminating" -Julia Cameron, author, The Artist's Way The message in Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers is that the more conscious we become of the personal patterns, the better able we will be to live the answers to life's questions rather than just suffering through them and learning. nothing from them or about them.

The following is an excerpt from Becoming Whole: A Jungian Guide to Individuation. Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers Nov 17, 2011.

com's Bud Harris Author Page. The following is an excerpt from Becoming Whole: A Jungian Guide to Individuation.

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Knowing Life’s Questions and Living the Answers Means Accepting the Paradoxes of Peace, Love and Conflict that Mark Our Lifetimes

Knowing Life’s Questions and Living the Answers Means Accepting the Paradoxes of Peace, Love and Conflict that Mark Our Lifetimes.

The paradox of choice will probably still be an issue for you even after you’ve narrowed down your pool. You might be a one-book-at-a-time reader. Or maybe you’re like Naval Ravikant, who advocates for reading 10 to 50 books at any given time.

Your discussion will live here. Start typing, we will pick a forum for you). Please select a forum. In this guide we will be giving you a rough guide on how to answer the seen poetry question in your English Literature exam, as well as a variety of practise questions you can use and a basic analysis of each poem. The speaker walks through the streets of London talking about all the negatives, and how the poor have no power, money or freedom while the government control everything.

Ego – Leave a Mark on the World. Social – Connect to others. Freedom – Yearn for Paradise. The 12 Archetypes in Detail.

We live in an era of pop psychology, where self-help books offer five easy steps to fixing your life, and television personalities like Dr. Phil solve marital problems in fifteen minute segments. It is refreshing to encounter work that challenges us to forego instant gratification, and instead take a long view of the work we each need to do to understand ourselves and our problems. Dr. Bud Harris, a Jungian analyst with several decades of clinical therapeutic experience, examines these essential topics in a thoughtful presentation of the psychological challenges we face over a life span.The ideas are complex, and the tone of the work is sober and scholarly. Fortunately, Harris writes beautifully, with simple, lucid prose. He elucidates how reflection and insight into the root causes of our behavior and attitudes can help us take "psychological responsibility for our previous unconscious actions, "and ultimately "weave the experiences of our life and our fate...into the patterns of our destiny and begin to comprehend what life wants of us." He hastens to add that this effort has minimal support and value in "a society focused on extroversion, identity, and productivity." But he effectively argues the case for such soul-searching, and suggests that the effort is rewarded in a far richer, happier life.Using Carl Jung's seminal concepts, Harris describes the developmental stages of our lives, including struggles with identity as we move into adulthood, midlife conflicts, and late-life efforts towards emotional maturity. He uses his own conversations with therapy clients to illustrate how some of these issues can play out, and details how clients' dreams can be remarkably useful in illuminating unconscious messages. In one example, he recounts the story of a woman who had started over in a midlife with a new career and a new relationship, feeling herself to be a different person. A dream repeating several times, however, found her in her old home with her former husband, who "looked at her and smirked knowingly." Therapist and client worked together to see that the dream was pointing out her denial of her past life and former self, and that the task of integrating the old with the new still remained. Rather than breaking and new ground, the author provides a synthesis of ideas in the field, drawing from and appropriately acknowledging the work of Jung, Sam Keen, Joseph Campbell, Marie-Louise von Franz, and others. But while there is nothing particularly innovative here, the work is nonetheless impressive as a gracefully written, clearly presented guide to a complex school of thought-Laurie Sullivan
  • Shou
I have read dozens of book by and about Carl Jung. I have even taken advanced courses in psychology. None of those books or classes prepared me for the disarming honesty and straight-forward advice that Dr. Harris gives to readers who are trying to improve themselves and their relationships, both inside and out. Forget convention. Forget what nice people are supposed to do or say. To have a healthy mind, heart, and soul requires honesty with yourself and others. In particular, Dr. Harris has taught me (1) it is more important to be honest with yourself than to be "hypocritical" towards people who don't deserve our forgiveness. (2) that humans are complicated, dualistic creatures of both light and darkness. You cannot become a happier person by denying the dark parts of yourself...only by acknowledging your dual nature and accepting the good with the bad. (3) peace is only the space between wars, both literally and spiritually. We, as human beings, must be striving to conquer the next great challenge before us. To do otherwise is to die a little more each day. Thank you , Dr. Harris, for this wonderfully insightful and practical-minded book. Reading your book made me feel alive again.
  • Brakora
Best summary of what it's like to be a Jungian analyst that I have ever read. Encourage persons wanting an easily read introdution to read.
  • Faebei
In our adult lives, we often spend a lot of time and energy seeking successes by conforming to the demands of the outer world of our culture. Often those cultural demands take us further from the inner world of our developing potential. While enjoying the rewards of cultural successes, we often feel an emptiness-because of the undeveloped potential of our inner world. In his book, Knowing the Questions, Living the Answers, Dr. Bud Harris gives us examples of people who, like ourselves, rediscover that potential and who develop that potential and who then are able to live their lives more creatively. This adult journey usually requires a guide. Dr. Harris is a Jungian analyst who clearly serves as an excellent guide. In his book, he discusses how to knock down those walls of conventional thought that keep us from reconnecting with our hidden inner potential and how to build bridges that reconnect us with our inner potential. Dr. Harris demonstrates how love leads us on this journey: love and respect for ourselves and the love and respectfulness of those meaningful people around us. This adult journey is not an easy one and there are lots of distractions along the way, but the journey can bring us a new level of awareness and understanding, and a satisfaction and grace that is felt deeply.
  • Axebourne
This book is one of my favorites and one in which I return to when I seek wisdom, encouragement, and a companion in my journey. Dr. Harris' voice is one that can reach across educational, cultural, socio-economic boundaries..he speaks directly to the human experience~the human heart.
If you are transitioning into uncomfortable or new circumstances buy this book and explore the questions along with a caring, Jungian analyst as your guide.