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Download Wine Wars: The Curse of the Blue Nun, the Miracle of Two Buck Chuck, and the Revenge of the Terroirists eBook

by Mike Veseth

Download Wine Wars: The Curse of the Blue Nun, the Miracle of Two Buck Chuck, and the Revenge of the Terroirists eBook
ISBN:
0742568202
Author:
Mike Veseth
Category:
Beverages & Wine
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (October 16, 2012)
Pages:
264 pages
EPUB book:
1961 kb
FB2 book:
1899 kb
DJVU:
1814 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
897


Wine and the wine business are at a critical crossroad today. However, the book has a number of limitations that lead it to deliver less than it could

Wine and the wine business are at a critical crossroad today. However, the book has a number of limitations that lead it to deliver less than it could. It is primarily about mass-marketed wines (both cheap and expensive) with almost no discussion of the role of boutique wineries. In some cases he reinforced my own observations, in others it was many of those "Of course!

possesses the art of expression: the Wine Wall, the DaVino Code, the McWine .

possesses the art of expression: the Wine Wall, the DaVino Code, the McWine Conspiracy and, without doubt one of the best, Ch'teau Cash Flow. Veseth pulls back the curtain on an ongoing 'bargain wine revolution,' talking about the provenance of Trader Joe's beloved Two Buck Chuck, and how conglomerates without house brands have bought their way into an assortment of once-local brands. This is a serious book about the future of the wine industry that does not take itself too seriously. The writing of wine experts has long been lampooned for its pretension and incomprehensibility to the layperson.

Two Buck Chuck, the second force, symbolizes the rise of branded products like the famous Charles Shaw . Will globalization and Two Buck Chuck destroy the essence of wine? Perhaps, but not without a fight, Veseth argues.

Two Buck Chuck, the second force, symbolizes the rise of branded products like the famous Charles Shaw wines sold in Trader Joe's stores. He counts on "the revenge of the terroirists" to save wine's soul.

Writing with wit and verve, Mike Veseth (. Two Buck Chuck, the second force, symbolizes the rise of branded products like the famous Charles Shaw wines sold in Trader Joe's stores.

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Two Buck Chuck, the second force, symbolizes the rise of branded products like the famous Charles Shaw wines sold in. .

brings all of these questions together in the only book on the wine business written engagingly for all lovers of wine. the Wine Economist) tells the compelling story of the war between the market forces that are redrawing the world wine map and the terroirists who resist them. It is the battle for the future of wine-and even for its soul. The fight isn't just over bottles bought and sold, however; power and taste are also at stake

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Globalization has pushed back the borders of the wine world, creating a complex, interconnected market where Old World and New World wines and producers compete head to head. Writing with wit and verve, Mike Veseth (a.k.a. the Wine Economist) tells the compelling story of the war between the market forces that are redrawing the world wine map and the terroirists who resist them. It is the battle for the future of wine-and even for its soul. The fight isn't just over bottles bought and sold, however; power and taste are also at stake. Who will call the shots in the wine market of the future? Who will set the price? Whose palate will prevail? Will it be Two Buck Chuck or tradition-steeped vintners? Veseth masterfully brings all of these questions together in the only book on the wine business written engagingly for all lovers of wine.
  • Laizel
I am a wine enthusiast (see below) who eagerly awaited Wine Wars and read it quickly. It's an easy-to-read book with numerous interesting observations, anecdotes, facts, and speculations about wine economics and the operation of the global wine industry. For that reason, I think most wine lovers will find it to be at least moderately interesting, and will be rewarded by insight into the industry.

Among the interesting pieces are discussion of wine customer segmentation, dissection of the local supermarket wine section, discussion of the Trader Joe's and Costco effects on wine, and the interweaving of wine merchandising history with speculations about the future development of the industry. And there are various interesting facts about the wine markup at Costco, the relationship between Two Buck Chuck and German wine habits, and various brands and historical episodes.

The economic parts are journalistic, meaning that the author does not expound any economic theory, and much less any specific models, equations, or data. It's a readable narrative such as might appear in magazine articles, not at all an academic work. That's a good thing for a general reader, I suppose.

However, the book has a number of limitations that lead it to deliver less than it could. It is primarily about mass-marketed wines (both cheap and expensive) with almost no discussion of the role of boutique wineries. I would have enjoyed extended discussion of boutique phenomena such as tasting rooms, wine holidays, and wine clubs. The author's focus on economic relevance no doubt eliminated such wineries as insignificant players in the global business, although I would argue that these phenomena are both relevant to branding efforts (e.g., wine tourism in Napa) and of interest to the people likely to purchase his book.

That highlights a second problem: it is unclear exactly who the reader should be. One might suppose that -- using the Constellation Brands segmentation it presents -- the audience would be wine enthusiasts. Who else would be so interested in the topic of wine economics? Yet if that is the case, he misses the mark: too much time is spent explaining things that don't need explaining to that audience (such as "Carignan is the sixth most-planted red grape variety ... Have you heard of it?"). And as I noted above, topics likely to be of intense interest to them are mostly ignored. For instance, I would love to see an economic treatment of questions such as: how do tasting rooms play into the picture? why do ultra-premium wineries succeed or fail? should one "invest" in wine? was there a real "Sideways" effect? do enthusiasts really have different taste?

A final issue is that the book is occasionally repetitive, repeating the same description of the supermarket "wine wall" and similar things in multiple chapters. This reflects the fact that it has been assembled in part from the author's blog, but closer editing would be welcome.

In summary: if you're a wine lover, it's worth the price, is easy to read, and will lead you to think more about the global wine business, its mass brands, and how the mass wine market operates. However, it won't give you much insight into the ultra-premium world that may be of greatest interest to enthusiasts.

(Kindle note: I would have preferred to read this on my Kindle, but it was available later than the print edition. If you have a Kindle, you might want to wait for that version scheduled for July. The book is a straight-through, easy read, with no need to flip back and forth or take notes ... perfect for a Kindle.)
  • Keath
I have been in the wine industry since 1972 (the height of Blue Nun) working in four countries over that time (in California at the start of 2$Chuck), so I found many of the observations made by Professor Veseth fitted with my own experiences. In some cases he reinforced my own observations, in others it was many of those "Of course! Why didn't I think of that?" moments.

Positives.
Over all the book has been well structured and entertainingly written. I found the 'updates' of the original text put in at the end of each section, making sense of events that have happened especially since the influence of the GFC.

Less than positives.
Many of the points made, though very valid, were often repeated or heavily laboured. I guess that repetition drive home the point in learning, however I found it unnecessary. My personal observations vary from the Professor's - the causal impetus for the popularity of Blue Nun and 2$Chuck might have been expanded on (we need to learn from experience) as might the causes of huge expansion of wine-drinking in the previously non-wine-drinking sections of our communities. I would have liked more of his insights into the possible future.

Overall, a good read, with good insights and would be especially valuable for people starting in the industry - both in production and in marketing.
  • Orll
An insightful look at the world of wine by an economist who can write well! The book contains surprises (I didn't know that Great Britain is the world's largest wine importer), predictability (the role of China going forward), and fun (the curse of the Blue Nun). There is also some real economic thinking embodied in the work (but simply used and not belabored). The use of "the wine wall" as an organizing device for the book was a terrific idea.

Wine Wars can be read and appreciated by a broad audience. To me it falls in with a few others that combine broad and deep knowledge of a product, good writing, and a touch of economic thinking: The Travels of a T-Shirt in the Global Economy: An Economist Examines the Markets, Power, and Politics of World Trade, and The Box: How the Shipping Container Made the World Smaller and the World Economy Bigger. I would also add Flower Confidential: The Good, the Bad, and the Beautiful to the list.

This book is definitely ready to read. Drink deeply!
  • Zepavitta
Mike Veeseth provides a different take on the world of wine than the standard wine books. Combining an economist’s view of the world in general with an obvious passion for and understanding of wine, Wine Wars creates a balanced view on the current state and prospective future of our local market’s wine wall. While there is some over-repetition in references to “two buck chuck” and the like, the book is a pleasant and informative read for anyone who is interested in wine.