almediah.fr
» » Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen: Capturing the Vibrant Flavors of a World-Class Cuisine

Download Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen: Capturing the Vibrant Flavors of a World-Class Cuisine eBook

by Rick Bayless

Download Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen: Capturing the Vibrant Flavors of a World-Class Cuisine eBook
ISBN:
0684800063
Author:
Rick Bayless
Category:
Regional & International
Language:
English
Publisher:
Scribner (October 21, 1996)
Pages:
448 pages
EPUB book:
1154 kb
FB2 book:
1984 kb
DJVU:
1213 kb
Other formats
txt rtf txt lit
Rating:
4.4
Votes:
816


Bayless's Mexican Kitchen' is restaurateur, PBS show host Rick Bayless' second major book on Mexican cuisine in cooperation with his wife, Deann Groen Bayless, and the first with collaborator, JeanMarie Brownson.

Bayless's Mexican Kitchen' is restaurateur, PBS show host Rick Bayless' second major book on Mexican cuisine in cooperation with his wife, Deann Groen Bayless, and the first with collaborator, JeanMarie Brownson. The primary point of view which distinguishes this book from both his earlier & Mexican' book and his later PBS tie-in, & One Plate at a Time' is that it deconstructs major aspects of Mexican dishes by breaking them down into & recipes and recipes which use these essential preparations as an ingredient.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 428) and index. Chef and teacher Rick Bayless provides the inspiration and guidance that home cooks have needed, from essential recipes and explorations of Mexico's many chiles to quick-to-prepare everyday dishes and pull-out-the-stops celebration fare. He begins by introducing the building blocks of Mexican cooking. Cultural background and practical tips help readers to understand these preparations and make them their own.

Bayless begins the journey by introducing us to the building blocks of Mexican cooking. With infectious enthusiasm and an entertaining voice, he outlines 16 essential preparations-deeply flavored tomato sauces and tangy tomatillo salsas, rich chile pastes and indispensable handmade tortillas. With infectious enthusiasm and an entertaining voice, he outlines 16 essential preparations-deeply flavored tomato sauces and tangy tomatillo salsas, rich chile pastes and indispensable handmade tortillas

Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen. Mexican Kitchen : Recipes and Techiniques of a World-Class Cuisine. Bursting with bold, complex flavors, Mexican cooking has the kind of gusto we want in food today.

Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen. by Rick Bayless and Deann Groen Bayless. Until now, American home cooks have had few authorities to translate the heart of this world-class cuisine to everyday cooking. In this book of more than 150 recipes, award-winning chef, author and teacher Rick bayless provides the inspiration and guidance that home cooks have needed.

Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen book. Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen: Capturing the Vibrant flavors of a World-Class Cuisine. 0684800063 (ISBN13: 9780684800066).

And, in Rick Bayless's skillful hands, this cuisine is within the reach of even the most amateur cook-all the instructions are contained within each recipe, with no cross referencing. 4 people like this topic.

of Cooking, and Rick Bayless’s Mexican Kitchen. Like a meal served at the streamlined Winesap, it adheres to a more classic ideal of what makes a book worth reading

Upon request, she also supplied me with a list of must-have cookbooks, which included Nigel Slater’s Appetite, the perennial classic Joy of Cooking, and Rick Bayless’s Mexican Kitchen. Proust’s peas and asparagus evoke the 19th-century still lives of Édouard Manet, whose numerous depictions of kitchen stock and cuisine include a hare hung by the legs and a platter of raw oysters accompanied by lemon wedges. Consider also Gertrude Stein’s Tender Buttons and its portraits of food. Like a meal served at the streamlined Winesap, it adheres to a more classic ideal of what makes a book worth reading. It doesn’t aspire to rework the novel as form, nor does it attempt to.

By Rick Bayless, JeanMarie Brownson and Deann Groen Bayless (Scribner, Fall 2000) Rick Bayless understands that preparing the bold flavors of Mexican food requires more time than most of us have for weeknight dinners. His latest cookbook is filled with recipes for fresh, delicious, nutritional meals that take less than 30 minutes to make. Salsas that Cook Currently out of stock.

photos Concept artwork Cover CD/DVD/Media scans Screen capture/Screenshot . Alll about the food (33 books items).

Please select Production or behind the scenes photos Concept artwork Cover CD/DVD/Media scans Screen capture/Screenshot. Please read image rules before posting. Dj Levels rated this 6/10 1 year, 11 months ago. Explore Content.

Bursting with bold, complex flavors, Mexican cooking has the kind of gusto we want in food today. Until now, American home cooks have had few authorities to translate the heart of this world-class cuisine to everyday cooking.In this book of more than 150 recipes, award-winning chef, author and teacher Rick bayless provides the inspiration and guidance that home cooks have needed. With a blend of passion, patience, clarity and humor, he unerringly finds his way into the very soul of Mexican cuisine, from essential recipes and explorations of Mexico's many chiles to quick-to-prepare everyday dishes and pull-out-the-stops celebration fare. Bayless begins the journey by introducing us to the building blocks of Mexican cooking. With infectious enthusiasm and an entertaining voice, he outlines 16 essential preparations-deeply flavored tomato sauces and tangy tomatillo salsas, rich chile pastes and indispensable handmade tortillas. Fascinating cultural background and practical cooking tips help readers to understand these preparations and make them their own. Each recipe explains which steps can be completed in advance to make final preparation easier, and each provides a list of the dishes in later chapters that are built around these basics. And with each essential recipe, Bayless includes several “Simple Ideas from My American Home”—quick, familiar recipes with innovative Mexican accents, such as Baked Ham with Yucatecan Flavors, Spicy Chicken Salad, Ancho-Broiled Salmon and Very, Very Good Chili. Throughout, the intrepid Bayless brings chiles into focus, revealing that Mexican cooks use these pods for flavor, richness, color and, yes, sometimes for heat. He details the simple techniques for getting the best out of every chile-from the rich, smoky chipotle to the incendiary but fruity habanero. Then, in more than 135 recipes that follow, Bayless guides us through a wide range of richly flavored regional Mexican dishes, combining down-home appeal and convivial informality with simple culinary elegance. It's all here: starters like Classic Seviche Tostadas or Chorizo-Stuffed Ancho Chiles; soups like Slow-Simmered Fava Bean Soup or Rustic Ranch-Style Soup; casual tortilla-based preparations like Achiote-Roasted Pork Tacos or Street-Style Red Chile Enchiladas; vegetable delights like Smoky Braised Mexican Pumpkin, or Green Poblano Rice; even a whole chapter on classic fiesta food (from Oaxacan Black Mole with Braised Chicken, Smoky Peanut Mole with Grilled Quail and Great Big Tamal Roll with Chard with the incomparable Juchitan-Style Black Bean Tamales); and ending with a selection of luscious desserts like Modern Mexican Chocolate Flan with KahIua and Yucatecan-Style Fresh Coconut Pie. To quickly expand your Mexican repertoire even further, each of these recipes is accompanied by suggestions for variations and improvisations. There is no greater authority on Mexican cooking than Rick Bayless, and no one can teach it better. In his skillful hands, the wonderful flavors of Mexico will enter your kitchen and your daily cooking routine without losing any of their depth or timeless appeal.
  • Friert
This is a great cookbook. I checked out four Bayless Cookbooks from my library and this was easily my favorite. I own most of the Moosewood cookbooks and have cooked a variety of cuisines, such as French, Italian, Cajun, American and the occasional curry or stir-fry. My Mexican vocabulary was limited to burritos and enchiladas. However, I have enjoyed this cookbook so that I could finally use chipotle peppers, beans and zucchini from my productive vegetable garden. I am looking forward to making every recipe in this book over the next year.
  • Globus
`Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen' is restaurateur / PBS show host Rick Bayless' second major book on Mexican cuisine in cooperation with his wife, Deann Groen Bayless, and the first with collaborator, JeanMarie Brownson.

The primary point of view which distinguishes this book from both his earlier `Authentic Mexican' book and his later PBS tie-in, `Mexico, One Plate at a Time' is that it deconstructs major aspects of Mexican dishes by breaking them down into `Essential' recipes and recipes which use these essential preparations as an ingredient.

This has a lot in common with Ming Tsai's technique in his latest book, `Simply Ming', with the difference that while many of Ming Tsai's preparations were of his own devising, Senor Bayless is presenting us with the fact that the Mexican cuisine by its very nature, lends itself to this `modularization'.

Almost all of the essential recipes are sauces and salsas. As Rick explains, the notion of a salsa is much broader to the Mexican mind than it may be to us gringos looking at the notion from the outside. The essential recipes are:

Simmered Tomato-Jalapeno Sauce

Roasted Tomato-Jalapeno Salsa from the Stone Mortar

Chopped Tomato-Serrano Salsa

Chopped Tomato-Habanero Salsa

Simmered Tomato-Habanero Salsa

Quick Cooked Tomato-Chipotle Sauce

Simmered Tomatillo-Serrano Sauce

Roasted Tomatillo-Serrano Salsa

Roasted Tomatillo-Chipotle Salsa

Sweet and Spicy Ancho Seasoning Paste

Sweet and Smoky Chipotle Seasoning Salsa

Bold Pasilla Seasoning Paste

Simmered Guajillo Sauce

Roasted Poblano Rajas with Seared White Onions and Herbs

Garlicky Achiote Seasoning Paste

Corn Tortillas

I reproduced all these titles here to give you the best possible sense of what is at the heart of this book. Like the Italian cuisine and its preserved meats, cheeses, pasta and vinegars, the great variety of Mexican cooking is based on a few essential ingredients and the most important ingredient family, the dried chile and corn flour, came about, like Italy's meats and cheeses, from the need to preserve important ingredients from spoilage.

If this book were nothing more than these recipes plus the dishes which can be built from them, it would be a great book of recipes, but not quite the `IACP Cookbook of the Year' winner from the Julia Child Cookbook Awards. Each recipe is presented with a variety of different methods, mostly based on alternatives between using the Mocajete (volcanic stone mortar), using the food processor, or using the blender. I give enormous credit to Bayless for not encouraging us to immediately going out and ordering ourselves a Mocajete since they are both rather expensive and (authentic versions are) difficult to find. While I am something of an atavistic cook, I may have been inclined to search one out anyway, but Bayless confession that the modern appliances are quite satisfactory in most applications leaves me satisfied with the equipment I already have.

In addition to the richly detailed and annotated recipes, there are terrific sidebars on ingredients and methods. This is the first place I have read that there is an important difference in taste between the yellow and the white onion, and that the white onion is preferred for Mexican dishes, unless otherwise specified. Senor Bayless also makes it clear that the Habanero and the Scotch Bonnet are two different plants, and identifies those features that distinguish one from the other. Note that the level of heat is NOT one of the things that separate the two fruits.

The remainder of the recipes fall into all the usual categories, with a few Mexican specialities. These are:

Salads and Other Starters

Light and Hearty Soups

Tacos, Enchiladas, and other Casual Fare

Vegetable, Bean, Rice, and Egg Dishes

Classic Fiesta Food

Main Dishes

Desserts

Wine and Margaritas

As egg dishes are one of my favorite criteria for judging a cookbook, I looked at these more carefully than the others and found more than just your usual omelets, scrambles, and fried eggs with Mexican sauces and Fritos. Mr. Bayless' version of Huevos a la Oaxaquena gives us an egg cooking method which I have not seen in any French cookbook, although the result is not too different from scrambled eggs cooked hard rather than the French preferred moist result.

One section that caught my eye was the recipes for moles (in Classic Fiesta Food). The first two recipes required 28 and 27 different ingredients respectively and the procedures for both took three pages of text. Fortunately, aside from the stock, none of the ingredients required a lot of additional preparation, but, I can easily see why moles are relegated to recipes for special occasions.

I wish I could say that Mr. Bayless' books, especially this award winning volume, were the best sources for Mexican recipes, but he has strong competition from Ms. Diana Kennedy. I have reviewed several of her books, and I suspect that if you simply want good Mexican recipes, Ms. Kennedy may have the edge, but go with Mr. Bayless if you have an interest in what it is that makes the Mexican cuisine tick.

You may have noticed Mr. Bayless little trade paperback on Salsas, which have a strong resemblance to some of the material in this book. Some reviewers believe the salsa book is lifted from this volume. This is not true. The approach is the same in both books, but the names of the salsa recipes in the two books do not exactly coincide. And, the salsa book has the added feature of giving the same recipe in several different sizes, which is simply great for entertaining and a real Mexican food junkie.

This may be the best of Mr. Bayless books to get first. His writing is better than in `Authentic Mexican' and he covers more dishes than in `One Dish at a Time'.
  • Goldfury
It is very evident when you first peruse this book that a lot of time and research went into creating an authentic experience with each dish. As a New Mexican, I can honestly say many of these dishes would hold up well in just about any of the restaurants I have frequented from taos to Albuquerque but can be executed within the confines of your own domestic kitchen. a nice addition to any cookbook collection.
  • Vutaur
I've only just begun to cook out of this book, but so far I really like the style and recipes. They dishes seem very authentic and the book explains regional nuances for each dish. Compared to all of the Mexican cookbooks I've acquired this is by far one of the best.
  • Venemarr
I gave it as a gift to my Mexican chef Jose and he loves it. The book has great recipes and we tried one in the restaurant and it was a hit. Love it.
  • adventure time
Wonderful book from a tireless advocate of authentic Mexican food. This book is a must have for anyone looking into cooking Mexican. Rick is the only author I trust when learning Mexican food basics. This book flows wonderfully while giving valuable insights into the less familiar ingredients. I think it is important to note that many of the recipes may have hard to find items, but may not be critically important to the end result. Rick Bayless also gives many alternatives methods or suggestions for convenience and for adaptation. For Example: He'll give you the traditional griddle method for cooking tortillas and a more convenient method by way of steaming. I feel privileged to have someone as knowledgeable and thorough like Rick Bayless teach me the basics of the Mexican kitchen. I grew up in a Mexican household and have traveled throughout Mexico. Rick's book is unquestionably authentic.
  • Kage
While I've only had this book for a few weeks, I've spent a lot of time reading through it, studying the recipes and enjoying Rick's writing and commentary. I can tell already this is going to be a book I will treasure, cook and learn from for many years to come.

I have tried a number of the recipes already and each one has turned out incredibly good, with rich flavors that don't just rely on heat. Indeed, my partner usually makes a face if I say I'm cooking Mexican because he doesn't do well with "spicy food" - but he's given me raves already on the pork carnitas, fish soup, and various salsas and guacamoles I've made for him so far.

I will say that many of the recipes in this book do take time to prepare, from grinding and making spice pastes to slowly simmering soups and braising meat. But the rich flavors that result are well worth the time, and I feel like I am at least really beginning to learn Mexican cooking like never before.

I also am eager now to get the rest of Rick Bayless's cookbooks if they are anywhere near as good as this one!
My wife's go to book for Mexican cooking. She has lots of cookbooks but has never bought another one for Mexican food. It's all right here.