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by Bart Yates

Download The Brothers Bishop eBook
ISBN:
0758209118
Author:
Bart Yates
Category:
Literature & Fiction
Language:
English
Publisher:
Kensington (July 1, 2005)
Pages:
304 pages
EPUB book:
1693 kb
FB2 book:
1940 kb
DJVU:
1340 kb
Other formats
txt mobi doc docx
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
988


The Brothers Bishop book. It was not just a book, it was a new reading experience! I want now to read EVERYTHING that Bart Yates wrote and everything he'll write. Highly recommended!!!.

The Brothers Bishop book.

Yates takes us inside these taboos and you explore them with the characters and suddenly you can understand how someone could get themselves into these situations and it gives us a better understanding.

Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Yates takes us inside these taboos and you explore them with the characters and suddenly you can understand how someone could get themselves into these situations and it gives us a better understanding. Not necessarily condoning, but understanding. I would recommend this novel to those who don't have triggers regarding incest, child abuse, or pedophilia.

Tommy and Nathan Bishop are as different as two brothers can be. Carefree and careless, Tommy is the golden boy who takes men into his bed with a seductive smile and turns them out just as quickly. No one can resist him-and no one can control him. Nathan is all about control. At thirty-one, he is bitter beyond his years. For while Tommy left home for New York City, Nathan stayed behind, teaching high school English in their provincial seaside hometown, simmering in his loneliness and reminders of their ruined family history. Carefree and careless, Tommy is the golden boy who takes men into his bed . Yates puts his novel together like a one-two punch and makes it readable. No one can resist him-and no one can control him, either. That salient point certainly isn't lost on his brother. At thirty-one, he is as dark and complicated as Tommy is light and easy, and he is bitter beyond his years.

Bart Yates is an American novelist, from Iowa City, Iowa. He also writes under the pen name of Noah Bly. The Brothers Bishop. The Distance Between Us. Leave Myself Behind. White Creek: A Fable. And writing as Noah Bly: The Third Hill North Of Town.

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ISBN 10: 0-7582-2006-5. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Impossible Choice.

Books related to The Brothers Bishop.

The Brothers Bishop is a touching, tattered tapestry of familial love, hatred, and emotional wreckage from an author whose voice is more than just honest or original; it’s real (The Plain Dealer). Books related to The Brothers Bishop.

Title: The Brothers Bishop Author: Bart Yates Publisher: Kensington Release Date: June 28th, 2005 Genre(s): Contemporary MM Romance Page Count: 304 . No one can resist him – and no one can control him, either. That salient point certainly isn’t lost on his brother.

During a two-week party in the middle of the summer, two very different brothers, Tommy and Nathan Bishop, will find their lives forever changed when a powerful secret is revealed, forcing them to confront their dark family history rife with abuse, tragedy, and lies.
  • Hanelynai
I bought The Brothers Bishop in December 2006 but didn’t get around to reading it for 10 years. The book survived a move within Texas and, more miraculously, made it to the DC area, where it endured three more moves. Especially in this age of vanity publishing—with hastily uploaded, error-ridden text files without the polish of careful thought—I appreciated the novel.

The first-person narrative worked well. After the first chapter, I wondered whether the viewpoint would toggle between Nathan and Tommy, but I was glad that Nathan was the portal for the entire story. I identified with Nathan so much. When Yates described Nathan as a hermit who chose to be alone, I knew that this book was going to be special. As a card-carrying introvert, I was proud. (Read “Caring For Your Introvert” by Jonathan Rauch in The Atlantic: Nathan fits the pattern in that article beautifully, for which I salute the author.) And the instant I read that the guest room door in Nathan’s cottage was a bookshelf, I thought of Anne Frank—whose diary affected me early in life. And how delightful to find that the book mentioned her just a bit after that.

The image of Nathan’s taking time to reflect and write in a journal and then later “circling misspellings and comma splices” while grading papers resonated with me. I’m an editor, and so many times I was chuckling with glee (and marveling at Yates's pristine grammar and usage). Nathan is complex and conflicted, straddling that overlapping area in the Venn diagram of introversion and misanthropy. So often I felt like I was reading about myself. The author nailed small-town life, complete with its simple pleasures and its meddlesome, small-minded elements.

I admire how Yates integrated sexuality into the story—yet it never once seemed gratuitous or trashy. He used sex as a scalpel, never as a club. I’d never trivialize the book by calling it porn. This wasn’t porn with a good story; it was a good story that, because it’s about human beings, included sexuality. It was nuanced and descriptive. Yates wrote about taboo topics, but he did so honestly and without apology. In the story, the tension (sexual and otherwise) builds and builds, approaching an asymptote. The whole journey was a stellar one, even up to the poignant end.

Yates's book made me want to find other gay literature, and my quandary now is to decide whether to go backward in time to read his first book or to read the later ones and then circle back. I’ve never been so pleased to confront such a problem.
  • Winawel
What to say? This book was brutal and wonderful and one of the best books I've read in a while. I read it over the weekend and my mind and body are still working through all the things this book, this story churned up inside me. I'm so happy to have discovered this author and look forward to reading his other books (two of which I see offered on Amazon). I love books that challenge me to expand my knowledge of things and to read other works mentioned in the books. I don't want to reveal too much but if I tried to say what the book was about I'd say it was about two brothers who found their soul mates (if not that, then definitely their touch stones). But having said that there is the problem. (And you have to put judgment aside because Nathan, the MC, is baring his soul to us and who are we to judge?) Nathan's brother Tommy, who goes through men like most women go through clothes, and Nathan is living an almost hermit existence. They can't find what they're looking for because they have already found it...or because of that its distorted their ability to find love. Its a wonderful, heartbreaking story and one that I'll read again and again. And because the author is so honest with the reader there were a couple times I was able to figure out what was coming but at the same time I wasn't sure and there were a couple times over the weekend I would put my Kindle down and say "oh no, no...." Sometimes I was right and sometimes I was wrong but that certainly didn't lessen the story - it was beautifully told. I highly recommend this book and this author.
  • Jaberini
I must have been drunk when I read the synopsis - because I expected a familiar, sweet family drama about forgiveness and moving on with a gay twist. Um... No...What I got was a multi-layered story full of well thought out plot devices and an incredibly complicated family dynamic. There were moments when I was literally on the edge of my seat...and others where I was actually shaking. This book will drag you through the mud of human emotions, and at the end, leave you incredibly satisfied, but hurting for the characters who, while all flawed, are imminently sympathetic. These are people you would see on the street, work with, date, cry for, and love. I'll be re-reding this one again.
  • Qusserel
There were several reasons not to like The Brothers Bishop. The main character wasn't very likable from the opening paragraph. Some of the characters were a bit cliche. It tackled some taboo issues in a delicate way, but then seemed to apologize for it. Like I said, several reasons not to like the book...yet, I could not put it down. I can't remember the last time I read a book as quickly and thoroughly as I did The Brothers Bishop. Yes, the main character had a lot of issues and wasn't a very nice person in a lot of ways, but I was drawn in so completely I rooted for him anyway. Some of the characters were a little cliche, but cliches become cliches because they are sometimes true representations.

I don't want to give away any spoilers, but if you're read any other reviews you probably already know some of the biggies. The author set out to explore several societal taboos and I thought he did it brilliantly. It even challenged my thinking sometimes. We're told certain things aren't supposed to happen, like incest, pedophilia, etc... Society doesn't accept these, so they are taboo. Yates takes us inside these taboos and you explore them with the characters and suddenly you can understand how someone could get themselves into these situations and it gives us a better understanding. Not necessarily condoning, but understanding.

I would recommend this novel to those who don't have triggers regarding incest, child abuse, or pedophilia. If you do, you might want to skip it.