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Download Iron Man: Demon in a Bottle (Marvel Premiere Classic) eBook

by Bob Layton,John Romita Jr.,Carmine Infantino,David Michelinie

Download Iron Man: Demon in a Bottle (Marvel Premiere Classic) eBook
ISBN:
0785130950
Author:
Bob Layton,John Romita Jr.,Carmine Infantino,David Michelinie
Category:
Graphic Novels
Language:
English
Publisher:
Marvel; Direct Ed., Premiere Ed edition (March 19, 2008)
Pages:
176 pages
EPUB book:
1701 kb
FB2 book:
1754 kb
DJVU:
1338 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
895


David Michelinie, Bob Layton and John Romita, Jr. tackled a very serious issue for comic books, substance abuse, and they did it in a sensitive, but often times painful, presentation

David Michelinie, Bob Layton and John Romita, Jr. tackled a very serious issue for comic books, substance abuse, and they did it in a sensitive, but often times painful, presentation. Iron Man may be invincible, Tony Stark may be the cool exec everyone wants to know, but he isn't quite as invincible. As a side note, years later, after Denny O'Neill had him relapse, writer Len Kaminski and artist Tom Morgan sort of revisited Tony's alcoholism when Tony's mind was thrown into the internet and an AI computer took over his body.

Demon in a Bottle" is a nine-issue story arc from the comic book series The Invincible Iron Man (vol. 1), published in issues 120 through 128 in 1979 by Marvel Comics. It was written by David Michelinie and Bob Layton and illustrated by John Romita, J. Bob Layton, and Carmine Infantino. Demon in a Bottle" is concerned with Tony Stark's alcoholism. The storyline ran in Iron Man (March–Nov. 1979), plotted by David Michelinie and Bob Layton, with script by Michelinie

Iron Man by Michelinie, Layton & Romita J. Excessive drinking would evolve into full-blown alcoholism in this book's most famous arc, "Demon in a Bottle," and a character that used to be known for his physical frailties would develop some compelling and believable mental ones.

Excessive drinking would evolve into full-blown alcoholism in this book's most famous arc, "Demon in a Bottle," and a character that used to be known for his physical frailties would develop some compelling and believable mental ones. While "Demon in the Bottle" is undoubtedly the spotlight, so much of this book will come to define how Iron Man stories would be told in the future.

Iron Man: Demon in a Bottle . by David Michelinie · John Romita Jr. · Bob Layton · Carmine Infantino. by David Michelinie · Bob Layton · John Romita Jr. 2008·. John Carter is the greatest hero of two worlds! Marvel at these classic tales of danger and daring as Carter battles deadly opponents, warring civilizations and a host of Barsoomian beasts. The Uncanny X-Men Omnibus, Vol. 2. by John Byrne · Chris Claremont · Mary Jo Duffy · Scott Edelman · Bob Layton · Dave Cockrum · John Romita Jr.

Bob Layton, David Michelinie. Penciller: Bob Layton, John Romita Jr. Inker: Bob Layton.

Mr. Michelinie and the artist Bob Layton (who might be my fave classic Iron Man artist) do that in this collection.

Mr. They show us that it’s not the armor of Ol’ Shell Head that makes him a hero, it’s his ability to face and defeat his demons. Here’s Mr. M again: As Bob and I always envisioned him, Tony Stark, when stripped of everything nonessential, is a man of innate nobility.

Marvel Premiere Classic Marvel. Become a fan. Author David Michelinie. Illustrator Bob Layton, John Romita J. Carmine Infantino. Price range (0 to disable). Expire tracking in. 1 week 1 month 3 months 6 months 12 months 3 years 5 years 10 years. You will get a notification at the top of the site as soon as the current price equals or falls below your price. You can also get an instant mobile notification with our iPhone- or Android app.

Carmine Infantino . Top Rated Lists for Iron Man: Demon in a Bottle.

Most issue appearances. 94 items Top 100 Marvel Graphic Novels and Stories. 10 items Top 10 Iron Man Graphic Novels.

Iron Man - Carmine Infantino.

Invincible Iron Man 126 Marvel 1979 NM- Demon In A Bottle Tales Of Suspense 39 Condition Near Mint- Shipping Shipped in a box, sandwiched between rigid cardboar. Marvel Comics Retro: The Invincible Iron Man Comic Book Cover Suiting Up for Battle (aged) Poster 24 x. Iron Man Comic Filmquisition: AdapNation: Iron Man 4: Demon in a Bottle. Find this Pin and more on Articles for Reading by Becky James. Iron Man - Carmine Infantino. People also love these ideas.

Follows the adventures of Iron Man as he faces criminal industrialist Justin Hammer and his army of super-villains.
  • Thetahuginn
Before David Micheline begins his legendary run on "The Amazing Spider-Man" in the 80s & 90s, he was writing Iron Man stories in the late 70s & the early 80s. "Demon in the Bottle" was one of his best Iron Man stories that pits Iron Man against his drinking problems. It opens with #120-121 where Iron Man tangles with the Sub-Mariner until his armor starts to malfunction. Then in #122, the origin of Iron Man was retold. Then in #123-124, Tony Stark took his girlfriend & bodyguard Bethany Cabe to Atlantic City in the casino where they tangles with the Melter, Blizzard & Whiplash. In #125, Iron Man was framed for murder and Tony Stark is taking lessons from fellow Avenger Captain America. Oh yeah, and Ant-Man makes a guest appearance as well. In #126, Tony Stark was held captive by his archrival Justin Hammer & his supervillains. In #127, Iron Man plays one-man army as he single-handedly takes down Justin Hammer's supervillains. But all these events took a terrible toll on Stark as he starts drinking even more and he snapped at his faithful butler Jarvis which leds to him to resign as Tony Stark's butler. In #128, Stark's drinking problem causes him to lose control of the Iron Man armor. Although he was confronts by Bethany and she told him about how she lost her husband to drugs. The story concludes when a sober Tony Stark decides to win back Stark International from S.H.I.E.L.D.

"Demon in the Bottle" is the best Iron Man story ever and Tony Stark's drinking problems will come back to haunt him in the later storyline "Alcohol Relapse" where Stark was reduced to a homeless alcoholic.
  • Contancia
I just got a copy of 'Iron Man Armored Vengeance' from Amazon today. It collects a mini series from earlier this year that I did not know was even out there by the great team, actually the best Iron Man team ever, of Michelinie and Layton. It takes place before Rhodey ever dons the War Machine armor and has all those fantastic Michelinie/Layton elements that true Iron Man fans miss. This was the best Iron Man book I've read in years. I really, really enjoyed this. I read it from cover to cover just now, and afterwards I sit here and wonder how come nothing like this is being done today? I like the current Iron Man series, but it's slow going compared to this . This was Iron Man as I remember him. Great Stuff!
  • SadLendy
David Michelinie, Bob Layton and John Romita, Jr. tackled a very serious issue for comic books, substance abuse, and they did it in a sensitive, but often times painful, presentation. Iron Man may be invincible, Tony Stark may be the cool exec everyone wants to know, but he isn't quite as invincible.

As a side note, years later, after Denny O'Neill had him relapse, writer Len Kaminski and artist Tom Morgan sort of revisited Tony's alcoholism when Tony's mind was thrown into the internet and an AI computer took over his body. Yes he drank, and Tony still took responsibility when he got back into his body (and fought both War Machine, made up, then joined forces with WM and Force Works to find an all-powerful Mandarin) and went to a meeting. The cover of issue 313 (vol. 1) is just fantastic: The "spirit" of Iron Man putting his hand on Tony, stopping him from drinking.
  • Gardall
A timely book from the late 1970's on addiction, and for a comic book, a classic.

It's a shame that the MCU won't even touch this with the cinematic version of Tony Stark, since Robert Downey Jr. did have substance control issues in real life prior to getting the Iron Man gig.
  • ᵀᴴᴱ ᴼᴿᴵᴳᴵᴻᴬᴸ
A great read.The art in the first part (#149-#150 was really good,and the story was a non-stop great time.The followup story was good too but the art was so far off base that it really left a bad taste in my mouth.Over all as a package though I thought it was great.The only gripe I guess I have is that it's to bad they didn't include the final chapter of the trilogy.
  • unmasked
By the time these issues were originally published, Iron Man had been around for nearly 15 years, but for all his popularity-- sharing a book with Captain America in the 1960s, moving to his own title, and playing a major role in the Marvel title The Avengers-- he'd never quite made a mark as a character the way other heroes of the Marvel-verse had. Simply put, he felt more like a concept-- take a James Bond-like playboy named Tony Stark and merge him with the idea of the Knight in Shining Armor-- than a fully-fleshed out idea. It's a neat concept, but one that a long string of very talented writers and artists failed to develop. Even literally giving Iron Man a new heart-- to replace the shrapnel-damaged ticker that had spurred the invention of his life-giving armor in the first place-- failed to pump new blood into the character. He seemed destined to remain a second-tier figure, fun and visually striking, but lacking the pathos of such landmark heroes as Spider-Man and the Fantastic Four.

In 1978, that all changed. Writer/co-plotter David Michelinie and Artist/co-plotter Bob Layton have stated in numerous interviews that they see themselves as craftsmen at the service of the characters, and that they want readers to become absorbed in the storylines, rather than thinking about the creators behind the scenes. Fine, but their own landmark work on this title belies that modesty. Simply put, what was needed was not a new heart, or new armor, or a big-time supervillain, but two artists alert to the possibilities buried within the title, and especially the title character. For all intents and purposes, they re-invented Tony Stark/Iron Man, and gave Marvel a whole new hero to play with.

M&L's solution to the riddle that had bedeviled even Stan Lee was remarkably simple: what if we really took this guy seriously, and tried to tell some realistic stories about him? What if we made him a real character-- funny, fleshed-out, full of strengths and ego and very deep flaws-- and tested his grace under pressure? What if we surrounded him with a top-notch supporting cast? What if we gave him a real girlfriend, instead of the Harlequin robots that had populated the book in the past? What if we really explored what it meant to be a Cold Warrior, to think about the ethics and unforseen consequences of your actions and inventions? In other words, what if we emphasized the "man" in the title, rather than the "iron"?

What resulted was a run of 40 issues (#116-156, although Layton left after #153) that offered a gripping and very human arc, respecting the genre conventions of the superhero tale (the costumes, the action sequences, the patented marvel hero crossovers) while also asking them to grow up. This wasn't new to Marvel, but it was new to Iron Man, and M&L's run on the title heralded a renaissance at a company that had been in a downward creative spiral for the previous half-decade: in the wake of M&L would come Frank Miller's Daredevil, John Byrne and Chris Claremont's X-Men (and Byrne's even-better five-year run on the Fantastic Four), Walt Simonson's mythic look at Thor, and the classic Hobgoblin arc in Spider-Man (it's not a coincidence that these books followed editorial and business-side shake-ups that would lead to better conditions for writers and artists, and draw some of the best talent to the company. After all, treating people like human beings shouldn't only apply to fictional characters).

I emphasize that whole 40-issue arc because some people have complained that the storylines here are wrapped up too quickly and neatly. That's a fair complaint, but I think it's more an effect of the TPB form (which has to end *somewhere*, and gives a sometime-false impression of closure) than the stories themselves-- the issues and ideas raised here continue to be developed after the stories collected in the book. In fact, M&L do such a good job re-inventing the character that they haunt every creative team that followed them on the book, as new writers and artists either choose to emphasize the extremes of Stark's flaws (Denny O'Neill's often fascinating but misguided restaging of Stark's alcoholism in the early 80s is but one example, althoug it's so grippingly done that, for all its problems, it probably deserves its own TPB, too) or ignore M&L's innovations altogether choosing to revert Stark to his crass playboy persona of the 60s (the recent Civil War series is at least an attempt to do something unique with what M&L wrought). In the end, not even M&L could live up to their own legacy-- their much-anticipated return to the title in the mid-80s (partially collected as an "armor wars" TPB) started strong, but was eventually overwhelmed by its action sequences, which didn't flow in and out of their characters as gracefully as their first run had.

Which is why it's great this first run is now collected and back in print. Is it perfect? No. Is it occasionally nostalgic? Sure (check out those disco-era fashions). But none of that eradicates M&L's achievement-- in a genre that sometimes emphasizes mindless mechanical action and macho cliche, they managed to create a brief, shining moment of humanism. And that, in the end, is what superheroes are all about.