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by Mort Walker

Download Sams Strip eBook
ISBN:
1560979720
Author:
Mort Walker
Category:
Graphic Novels
Language:
English
Publisher:
Fantagraphics Books (March 10, 2009)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1740 kb
FB2 book:
1671 kb
DJVU:
1691 kb
Other formats
txt mbr lit doc
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
698


Addison Morton Walker (September 3, 1923 – January 27, 2018) was an American comic strip writer, best known for creating the newspaper comic strips Beetle Bailey in 1950 and Hi and Lois in 1954. He signed Addison to some of his strips

Addison Morton Walker (September 3, 1923 – January 27, 2018) was an American comic strip writer, best known for creating the newspaper comic strips Beetle Bailey in 1950 and Hi and Lois in 1954. He signed Addison to some of his strips. Walker was born in El Dorado, Kansas, as the third of four children in the family. His siblings were Peggy W. Harman (1915–2012), Robin Ellis Walker (1918–2013) and Marilou W. White (b. 1927)

Sam's Strip was a humorous comic strip created and produced by Mort Walker and Jerry Dumas. It was distributed by King Features Syndicate from October 2, 1961 to June 1, 1963.

Sam's Strip was a humorous comic strip created and produced by Mort Walker and Jerry Dumas. The series depended heavily on metahumor, and appearances by famous comic-strip characters.

Mort Walker was born in 1923 in El Dorado, Kansas. Walker was inducted into the Museum of Carton Art Hall of Fame in 1989. Walker has written several books on the art and history of comics, as well as children's books

Mort Walker was born in 1923 in El Dorado, Kansas. He published his first comic when he was 11 and sold his first cartoon at 12. By 14, he was selling gag cartoons regularly to Child Life, Inside Detective and Flying Aces magazines. Walker has written several books on the art and history of comics, as well as children's books. He has published numerous collections of his comics work, including 92 Beetle Bailey and 35 Hi and Lois paperbacks.

Sam and Silo is an American comic strip created by Mort Walker (creator of Beetle Bailey and Hi and Lois) and Jerry Dumas, which began on April 18, 1977. The series is a "continuation" or a spin-off of Sam's Strip (1961-1963), as it uses the same characters. Dumas was solely responsible for the strip from 1995 and drew it until his death in 2016

Mort Walker has been writing and drawing comics since he was 12. He created Beetle Bailey in 1950, following his service in the US Army in World War II, and the strip has been popular around the world ever since!

This is a great collection of every strip from 1965. It's nice to have the complete year, as I don't think some of these strips have been reprinted before.

Addison Morton Walker, more popularly known as Mort Walker, was an American comic artist, best known for creating the newspaper comic strips Beetle Bailey in 1950 and Hi and Lois in 1954

Addison Morton Walker, more popularly known as Mort Walker, was an American comic artist, best known for creating the newspaper comic strips Beetle Bailey in 1950 and Hi and Lois in 1954. Born in El Dorado, Kansas, he grew up in Kansas City, Missouri. He had his first comic published at the age of 11, and sold his first cartoon at 12.

Mort Walker drawing the character Beetle Bailey in 1993 Mort Walker, the creator of Beetle Bailey, a comic strip about an Army private who malingered his way through seven decades at Camp Swampy to the consternation of hi. .

Mort Walker drawing the character Beetle Bailey in 1993. After his attempt at a comic strip set at a university lagged, he substituted barracks buddies for dorm mates, sergeants and generals for professors, and the military bureaucracy for academic pronouncements. Ray Fairall/Associated Press. Mort Walker, the creator of Beetle Bailey, a comic strip about an Army private who malingered his way through seven decades at Camp Swampy to the consternation of his commanding officers and the delight of his fans in the armed forces and beyond, died on Saturday at his home in Stamford, Conn. He was 94. His death was confirmed by his son Brian.

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A comic strip about a comic strip character named Sam that includes guest appearances by Charlie Brown .

A comic strip about a comic strip character named Sam that includes guest appearances by Charlie Brown, Mickey Mouse, Popeye, and tons of others. Created by Mort Walker and Jerry Dumas, better known for their works on "Hi and Lois," "Beetle Bailey," and the sequel to "Sam's Strip," "Sam and Silo," this strip had a short run - less than two years - but remains a cult classic and has finally been collected in one volume by Fantagraphics.

A short-lived '60s comic strip starring the Yellow Kid, Jiggs and Charlie Brown!?Sam's Strip broke fourth wall to a new level, playing with the basic elements of the cartoon form, experimenting with different art styles and featuring famous characters from other strips. Sam and his cartoonist assistant owned and operated the comic strip they inhabited. Krazy Kat, Dagwood, Charlie Brown and many other characters made walk-on appearances. Sam and his assistant discussed the inner workings and hidden secrets of life within the panel borders. This collection features the cult-classic's complete 20-month run, almost 510 daily strips. Mort Walker and Jerry Dumas provide first-hand accounts of the creation of the strip and other rare, behind-the-scenes material, including unpublished sketches, original artwork, photographs and sales brochures.
  • RuTGamer
In the very first strip of the series SAM'S STRIP, there are three panels of arrows pointing toward the right and, in the final panel, we find the title character still being drawn by his artist, a cartoon version of Jerry Dumas. "Just a minute!" barks Sam. "I'm not ready yet!" This is a good indication of what's coming. Then, in the next day's installment, Sam is visited by Happy Hooligan, and...What's that? You've never heard of Happy Hooligan? How about Tillie the Toiler? Harold Teen? Krazy Kat and Ignatz Mouse? The Gumps? Well, that's probably why SAM'S STRIP had such a hard time when it originally ran, and why this Fantagraphics Books collection will always have a small readership: the humor was predicated on knowing who these classic comic-strip stars were.

Originated by Dumas with frequent collaborator Mort Walker, the prolific creator of BEETLE BAILEY, SAM'S STRIP ran from October 1961 to June 1963. The conceit was that businessman Sam and his unnamed assistant owned and operated the comic strip in which they existed, and they were fully aware of their status as funny drawings. The creative team played around with the cartoon form's basic elements, having the protagonists talk to the readers, fight with their artist, shove sound effects and word balloons into the storage closet, try scheme after unsuccessful scheme to increase subscriptions, and welcome cameos by characters as famous as Blondie, Charlie Brown, and Mickey Mouse. Unfortunately, while this metahumor appealed to cartoonists and comics aficionados, it baffled the mainstream readers, and the unfunny (now terribly-dated) real-world political strips didn't help. Its circulation never reached more than about 60 newspapers, and SAM'S STRIP was cancelled after almost 510 installments.

This collection includes the complete 20-month run of what's become a cult classic. There are short essays by the creators along with other special features that should appeal to the comic-strip fan, but the series itself is strictly suited to those familiar with the early strip characters. However, to them, I can highly recommended this volume.
  • romrom
If you enjoy reading about the background of comics and comics history, this is a rare book featuring compositions of old and new (for the sixties) comics characters in humorously unique situations.
  • Meztihn
There's a reason why "conventional wisdom" is called "conventional" -- more often than not, it's passed the test of time and is sound. Sometimes, however, "conventional wisdom" takes on a life of its own and oversimplifies a situation that is really much more complicated than is commonly believed. Such appears to be the case with SAM'S STRIP, a short-lived but ingenious early-60s comic strip by Mort Walker and Jerry Dumas that, according to EVERY comment about it that I have ever read, prominently featured past comics characters doing constant "guest shots," yakking it up with the strip's protagonists (the bulb-nosed, apparently neckless Sam and his skinny, bespectacled, nameless sidekick/assistant), being feted at "comics characters' conventions," etc., etc. Well, this slender volume reprints the strip's entire run, and... remember what I said about "conventional wisdom"? The "comic about comics" (so claims this book's subtitle) did give other denizens of the funny papers a chance to "slum it" in Dumas' bare panels, but that conceit was only a small part of the fun. In fact, Walker and Dumas' inability to, in the immortal (albeit somewhat paraphrased) words of Gadget Hackwrench, "choose a thing... one thing... and stick with it" may be the reason why this witty, engaging effort never found an audience and ultimately died after a year and a half.

The core idea of SAM'S STRIP is that Sam and "Silo" (who'd get that name in a later Walker-Dumas strip that resurrected the characters but otherwise bore little resemblance to the original) are proprietors of their strip and engage in near-incessant "fourth-wall" breaking and ruminations about the ups and downs of running a panelological concern. They have closets full of punctuation marks and cartoon props, debate about the appropriate format for the strip (with the somewhat egotistical Sam usually having the more inflated notions of what the subject matter should be), and are constantly aware of their pen-and-ink insistence. For the early 60s, this was high-concept indeed. It was only natural that Walker and Dumas should get the idea of featuring other characters in walk-on roles, though they did usually play it safe by employing fellow King Features characters (Blondie, Krazy Kat and Ignatz, Popeye) or figures who had long since vanished from the scene (with Fred Opper's Happy Hooligan -- whose attempts to "crash" the strip became a running gag -- getting the most "mug time"). On several glorious occasions, Walker and Dumas trotted out a big-league cameo, as when Sam sees Charlie Brown driving by (!) and muses, "I knew having that big automobile account [i.e. the PEANUTS Ford Falcon franchise] would change that kid." The problem was that the creators didn't use these inter-strip get-togethers nearly as much as they should have. Instead, they whiled away a lot of their time with politically themed, time-dependent gags trading on the "New Frontier" administration of John Kennedy and the contemporary Cold War atmosphere. There's even a diabolically obscure reference to Vaughn Meader, the comedian who had 15 minutes of fame because of his uncanny vocal imitation of JFK. At various times, Sam identified as a Republican (when he and "Silo" discuss a good GOP candidate for 1964, "Silo" suggests Walt Disney -- who definitely had the right ideology!) and "Silo" as a Democrat. A casual reader who stumbled upon the strip one day and assumed it was some kind of politically-charged strip a la POGO could be excused for the mistake. These Cold War gags not only date the strip to a certain extent, they also detract from the strip's "primary mission," i.e. its "meta-comical" explorations and those delightful crossover visits. Perhaps Mort and Jerry had trouble thinking up enough self-referential gags to fill six days' worth of strips each week (the strip never had a Sunday page); if so, more's the pity.

SAM'S STRIP is definitely worth getting if you're a serious comics fan, or someone with an interest in the Kennedy era. The fact that I can logically recommend the volume to both groups, however, only points up how blurred the strip's focus could be at times. It's a highly fascinating misfire, but, I'm afraid, a misfire nonetheless.
  • Nea
Okay, well, maybe, Butch Cassidy said that first... As the subtitle suggests, the first twenty months is substantially different from the current silly cops strip, and features cartoon characters some so ancient that I did not initially recognize them. Thanks to Fantagraphics Books, this and other important strips are now available in their entirety. The epilogue includes interesting comments from Jerry Dumas and a time line helpful for some of us who had forgotten events from 1961 and 1962 and for younger folks born thereafter. The publication of this title is a boon to those interested in syndicated comic art history.