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Download The Prisoner: Shattered Visage eBook

by Mark Askwith,Dean Motter

Download The Prisoner: Shattered Visage eBook
ISBN:
0930289536
Author:
Mark Askwith,Dean Motter
Category:
Graphic Novels
Language:
English
Publisher:
DC Comics (October 1, 2000)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1146 kb
FB2 book:
1476 kb
DJVU:
1796 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.6
Votes:
376


The Prisoner: Shattered Visage is a four-issue comic book mini-series based on The Prisoner, the 1967 television series created by and starring Patrick McGoohan.

The Prisoner: Shattered Visage is a four-issue comic book mini-series based on The Prisoner, the 1967 television series created by and starring Patrick McGoohan. The name is a reference to Percy Shelley's famous sonnet Ozymandias, which forms part of the introduction. The series was illustrated by Mister X creator Dean Motter and co-written with Mark Askwith. It was later collected as a 208-page trade paperback, with the addition of a new prologue.

The Prisoner: Shattered Visage is a four-issue comic book mini-series by DC Comics based on The Prisoner (1967 series), the 1967 television series created by and starring Patrick McGoohan. The name is a reference to Percy Shelley's famous poem Ozymandias, which forms part of the introduction.

The Prisoner: Shattered Visage Paperback – October 1, 2000. by Mark Askwith (Author), Dean Motter (Author). Prisoner fans take note.

Collects Prisoner (1988) Written by Dean Motter. Somehow, the Prisoner has arrived here, and all he knows for certain is that someone is after him! Softcover, full color. Art by Mark Askwith  .

Based on the television programme starring Patrick McGoohan, this comic book sequel, told in a cinematic, atmospheric manner, provides all the answers to th. .The Prisoner: Shattered Visage. ISBN13:9780930289539. Release Date:October 2000.

Writer: Dean R. Motter, Mark Askwith Artist: Dean R. Motter Publisher: Titan Books Release Date: March 13, 2019 Cover Price . But in Shattered Visage we discover that 'Fallout' may have been a drug-fueled hallucination all along.

But in Shattered Visage we discover that 'Fallout' may have been a drug-fueled hallucination all along. Yet, in spite of all this, as a spiritual successor nothing else so far has come close.

The Prisoner: Shattered Visage - ඊ-පොත ලියන ලද්දේ Dean Motter .

The Prisoner: Shattered Visage - ඊ-පොත ලියන ලද්දේ Dean Motter, Mark Askwith. බේ PC, android, iOS උපාංගවල Google Play පොත් යෙදුම භාවිතයෙන් මෙම පොත කියවන්න. ොබැඳි කියවීම, උද්දීපනය කිරීම, පිටුසන් කිරීම හෝ ඔබ The Prisoner: Shattered Visage කියවන අතරේ සටහන් ගැනීම සඳහා බාගන්න. Set twenty years after the final episode of The Prisoner television series, Shattered Visage follows former secret service agent Alice Drake who awakens one day to find herself washed up on the shores of THE VILLAGE, shipwrecked and marooned, following a mysterious storm.

The Prisoner: Shattered Visage is a four-issue comic book mini-series based on The Prisoner, the 1967 television series starring Patrick .

The Prisoner: Shattered Visage is a four-issue comic book mini-series based on The Prisoner, the 1967 television series starring Patrick McGoohan. The series was illustrated by Mister X creator Dean Motter and co-written with Mark Askwith Contents.

Start by marking The Prisoner: Shattered Visage as Want to Read . The Prisoner: Shattered Visage is a 1988 comic book sequel to the 1967-1968 British TV series The Prisoner

Start by marking The Prisoner: Shattered Visage as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. The Prisoner: Shattered Visage is a 1988 comic book sequel to the 1967-1968 British TV series The Prisoner. I was first exposed to The Prisoner in the 1980s, and the show then still seemed not only ahead of its time, but ahead of our time.

Dean R. Motter, Mark Askwith . Publisher: Titan Comics. Availability: In stock.

The Prisoner: Shattered Visage
  • Cheber
This book will probably be of interest to no one other than fans of the 60s Spy-Fi series, "The Prisoner", so I'm writing this review with fans in mind and nobody else. Having said that ... Prisoner fans take note. This is the "official" ending. And its OK. The story line, as an ending, makes as much sense as any other I've seen. The artwork is good, but remember, "graphic novel" aside, this IS a comic book. If you're looking for Matisse look elsewhere. But if you want a fun read, a plausible ending to The Prisoner, and something neat to round out any sort of collection you may have of Prisoner related material you should get this book. I bought it, I read it, I'm keeping it for reference and for fun, and I'm happy with it. Given all of that there are two things to consider: #1; Many fans have come up with their own ending. Patrick McGoohan said in several interviews, many after the publication of Shattered Visage, that people should feel free to figure it out for themselves. He called it a metaphor, and as such it is open to more than one interpretation. So if the Shattered Visage ending isn't to your liking don't worry. Hang on to yours, because for you it is as official as any other and just as valid. #2; Pay close attention to the last two pages of the book. Look, take a minute, and above all THINK. I dislike spoilers and so won't say anymore. It is, however, a proverbial hoot. ;-) Be seeing you.
  • Beabandis
I enjoyed the TV show, but I found this book to be dull. I didn't really amount to anything. However, I do love the quote: "What happened to them? They were free to go. And you? I was free to stay."
  • Cildorais
It's a little weird, some of the ideas are a bit of a stretch. pretty faithful to the show, a lot of nice easter eggs. some parts are quite off base though...
  • DART-SKRIMER
A comic book 'sequel' to Patrick McGoohan's 1960's cult series "The Prisoner", released by DC Comics in the late 80's. The paperback collected edition is about 200 pages in length. Recommended to those already familiar with "The Prisoner"(in other words, newcomers to the show might be a bit lost).
  • Wiliniett
Disappointing after being such a huge fan of the TV series with Patrick McGoohan. It just got a bit tedious and did not make me wanting to find out who #1 was.
  • Vinainl
More?
  • Dilkree
What worked: The illustrations.

What didn't work: Underdeveloped characters, underused Number Six (He's The friggin' Prisoner for God's sake and he's barely in the comic), plot holes (***SPOILER WARNING Why would Number Six choose to remain in the Village? What reason did Number Two have to go crazy and blow up the Village? How did Number Six and the heroine escape the Village before Number Two blew it up? END SPOLIERS***), doesn't add anything new/exciting/thought-provoking to The Prisoner storyline.

Love it or hate it, Fall Out is THE proper ending to The Prisoner, not this potboiler of a sequel.

Be seeing you ;)
It's been some 20+ years since this authorized sequel to the visionary TV series "The Prisoner" appeared, and like the original series itself, it still causes controversy. Does it adequately address the unresolved questions & philosophical issues raised by the conclusion of the series? Does it match creator Patrick McGoohan's vision?

In large part, I think it does -- although when I first read the series, when it was originally published, I had far more mixed feelings. But the passage of time & subsequent re-readings have deepened my appreciation for what Motter & Askwith created in these pages. The key, I think, is in regarding this as A sequel, not THE sequel, i.e., a thoughtful, intelligent exploration of the ideas presented in the TV series, but not the only valid interpretation.

Some of the complaints about the graphic novel are based on its explanation for the final TV episode "Fall Out" & the follow-up set in the 1980s. Number Six was broken? Went mad? Succumbed? Of course fans of the series will be outraged by such a suggestion! But note who says that: not the authors themselves, but several of the characters in their story, every one of them with a specific agenda, a vested interest in their own interpretation, and the same blind spot about the soul of Number Six that his captors in The Village revealed time & again.

After all, who actually sounds & acts irrational in this story? It's Leo McKern's Number Two, who makes many of those claims about Number Six. To me, this is more a matter of psychological projection, since we know that he succumbed fairly quickly to the power of The Village & thus was granted a position of authority in its control structure. Number Six, on the other hand, displays the same character traits that we recall from the series, including a rejection of authority & a refusal to accept a number of any kind, despite the contrary claims of British intelligence.

You'll notice that I haven't said much about the plot itself. I prefer to leave that for the reader to discover, as Alice Drake finds herself in the role of Number Six after resigning from her intelligence job ... albeit in rather different fashion. This binding story thread is a delight, filled with variations on the original series & exhibiting the same terse, witty wordplay & ambiguity of the original scripts. And the fact that both Patrick McGoohan & Leo McKern approved of this story says much about its integrity -- I can't see either of them accepting shoddy or inferior writing in such a project.

Even more importantly, the story explores the nature of power & control, an issue that became even more pressing in the 1980s, and one which has all but overwhelmed our society today, with all of us immersed in its digital sea of constant surveillance, data mining, psychological manipulation by both government & corporation, and the occasional use of brute force to secure compliance. In this regard especially, as with the original series, the material remains frighteningly relevant.

As previous reviewers have noted, this story requires work, assuming intelligent & engaged readers who know to look below the surface ... as one of the supporting characters admonishes another, in fact! Accept nothing that's stated by the morally dubious intelligence agents at face value. As Number Six notes, it is possible to break the chain & be free. But it's a struggle, and it never really ends. If this isn't true to the spirit of the original series, then nothing is -- highly recommended!