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Download The Bug Boy (Hino Horror, 2) eBook

by Hideshi Hino

Download The Bug Boy (Hino Horror, 2) eBook
ISBN:
0974596116
Author:
Hideshi Hino
Category:
Manga
Language:
English
Publisher:
Dh Pub Inc (April 1, 2004)
Pages:
208 pages
EPUB book:
1422 kb
FB2 book:
1763 kb
DJVU:
1955 kb
Other formats
mbr lrf doc mobi
Rating:
4.8
Votes:
316


and now I know why the first Hino Horror volumes are so like Hino's early stuff: they actually are. DH was kind enough to drop the original pub date in this volume: 1975.

and now I know why the first Hino Horror volumes are so like Hino's early stuff: they actually are. That predates Panorama of Hell by nine years, and is very much still in Hino's "gross-'em-out!" phase. you know, all the standards.

Sanpei is bullied at school and mistreated at home. His only real friends are his pets. But when he gets stung by a strange insect, Sanpei's life changes forever! Transformed into a huge poisonous bug, he escapes to discover the world outside.

Transformed into a huge poisonous bug, he escapes to discover the world outside. Horror, Drama, Supernatural. There he finds only more hatred, and eventually he returns to exact a terrifying revenge. Read the comic below to learn why we stopped providing fan-made content. SHOW MORE arrow drop down. What Now? Read the official version. To keep reading this title, you can purchase the official version of this title here: DH Publishing.

Hino Horror, Bd. 2 book.

Мальчик-личинка ; 毒虫小僧 ; Bug Boy ; L'Enfant insecte (French) ; The Bug Boy ; Hino Horror ; Dokumushi . Transformed into a huge poisonous bug, he escapes to discover the world outside.

Мальчик-личинка ; 毒虫小僧 ; Bug Boy ; L'Enfant insecte (French) ; The Bug Boy ; Hino Horror ; Dokumushi Kozou. Genres: Drama Horror Supernatural.

Although it is six-film horror series, the movies have no form of continuity, canon, or connection between them.

Rejection and revenge when a victimized schoolboy is transformed into a huge poisonous bug.

com User, August 26, 2008. At first, I was a little bit put off by what seemed to be a crude, somewhat childish, style, but it didn't take very long before I was drawn in by the weird atmosphere of this horror comic.

Horror short stories bestseller out no. And Zōroku no Kibyō ("La enfermedad de Zoroku" in Spanish, "Zoroku's Disease" in English, don't know if it was ever published) is one of his best books.

Horror short stories bestseller out now. Hollywood, CA. 41strange. 1 ответ 0 ретвитов 4 отметки Нравится.

The apocalyptic post-war landscape and grotesque, twisted characters recur throughout his work. Best known for his l, Panorama of Hell, he has 200+ titles in print.

Sanpei is tranformed into a huge poisonous bug and seeks revenge on those who bullied and mistreated him as a boy.
  • Fearlesshunter
This is the first thing I ever read by Hideshi Hino, and it's a pretty good place for anyone who wants to explore the work of Hideshi Hino. At first, I was a little bit put off by what seemed to be a crude, somewhat childish, style, but it didn't take very long before I was drawn in by the weird atmosphere of this horror comic. If I had to describe the tone of this book, I would say that it feels like a really, really warped kids' book. It's a strangely compelling horror tale, but not without a demented sense of humor.

Like another reviewer, I saw some similarities here to Kafka's Metamorphosis and the David Cronenberg version of The Fly. I would also add that the style of the artwork reminded me just a little of some of Tim Burton's illustration work even though this predates the start of his career by a decade or so.

As I mentioned before, I was initially a little put off a little bit by the style of the artwork in this book, but now I like Hideshi Hino's artwork quite a bit. He really manages to take the stuff of nightmares and put it on paper (I also like the way he draws junkyards a lot too).

Overall, I would say that this is a good horror comic for those who are not squeamish and a pretty good starting point for those who want to explore manga beyond what you're likely to find at Barnes & Noble or any of the big chain bookstores.
  • Phallozs Dwarfs
A great tale with excellent artwork. A fine example of Hideshi Hino's work. A must have for any Hino fan.
  • Hurus
One of the all time classics by the great horror manga artist. Its dramatic and horrific with twists in the story, scary also
  • MilsoN
I have decided to be lenient in this review. This book is unmitigated garbage. Although I hate throwing away books, I feel like giving this manga away would be akin to passing on some horrible curse. The characters faces are amorphous and deformed, unconstrained by any given shape at any given time. Even before our "protagonist" turns into a murderous insect, he resembles some sort of beetle. This character, Sanpei, is unsympathetic to the extreme, being wholly responsible for his situation. He prefers to hang around snakes and rats than solve difficult math problems, like multiplying two by six. Then he catches an illness and becomes a horrible insect. He is happy for a while, but then goes on a murder spree, like any other protagonist. Eventually, [Spoiler Alert] his father shoots him and he dies. All of the sad parts are nigh comedic, and the parts that are supposed to establish sympathy fail to do so. Works like Uzumaki prove the validity of horror manga. However, this does not. Looking back on this one last time for a review, I realized the final insult Hino left me. This entire book was written in Comic Sans font. Do not subject yourself to this atrocity. The good horror may be in other manga, but the real horror is this book.
  • Ubranzac
Hideshi Hino, Hino Horror, vol. 2: The Bug Boy (DH Publishing, 1975)

...and now I know why the first Hino Horror volumes are so like Hino's early stuff: they actually are. DH was kind enough to drop the original pub date in this volume: 1975. That predates Panorama of Hell by nine years, and is very much still in Hino's "gross-'em-out!" phase. The Bug Boy, like The Red Snake before it, certainly fills the bill in that regard, with gratuitous dream vomit, human/centipede hybrids, mass murder... you know, all the standards. The story is simple: Sanpei, a youngster who is mercilessly bullied both at school and at home, is bitten by a strange bug and undergoes a metamorphosis, after which he realizes his new form will allow him to get revenge on those who caused him pain while he was still human. Very nasty, though with a surprisingly moral (for lack of a better term) ending; this is Hino through and through. Good stuff. *** ½
  • Marige
Although similar to Kafka's THE METAMORPHOSIS, the story differs in a very important way right at the start. This is the story of a young boy who is fascinated with bugs. This passion has earned him a bad reputation with other children, his teachers and his family. Then one day he finds a very strange bug which stings him.

Having been stung, the boy's body begins to undergo a transformation until he looks like a giant version of the bug that stung him. He is then driven from his home and takes refuge in the sewers. A second transformation occurs but this time it is of his mind and not body. Slowly he forgets that he was once a boy. He also loses his sense of right and wrong and delights in killing people. But a chance encounter with his old family brings out his old memories and he understands what he has done and become. Penance is sought.

This is more a tragic story than one of horror. Although one may not understand the boy's mental metamorphosis, it is easy to understand his horror when his mind clears. Although it has taken much from the Kafka story, it also share a lot with the Jeff Goldblum version of The Fly. Check it out.