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Download A Good Day's Work: An Iowa Farm in the Great Depression eBook

by Dwight W. Hoover

Download A Good Day's Work: An Iowa Farm in the Great Depression eBook
ISBN:
1566637023
Author:
Dwight W. Hoover
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Ivan R. Dee; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (April 18, 2007)
Pages:
256 pages
EPUB book:
1649 kb
FB2 book:
1724 kb
DJVU:
1875 kb
Other formats
lrf rtf lrf mbr
Rating:
4.5
Votes:
171


A Good Day's Work book.

A Good Day's Work book. In A Good Day's Work, Dwight Hoover, who grew up on an Iowa farm in this era, recalls the events of day-to-day life on a single farm, offering detailed descriptions of daily work in each of the year's four seasons. A Good Day's Work is a fascinating if grim reminder of what it was like to be a child with adult responsibilities. Mr. Hoover's unusual memoir recalls the rough edges as well as the happy moments of rural life. It is an honest re-creation of a world that was vanishing.

A Good Day's Work Dwight W. Hoover. Great anecdotal stories from an Iowa farm during the Great Depression. This book brought back many memories for me of visiting my older sister living on a farm in Indiana during the fifties. I also loved to hear my mother telling stories of growing up on a farm in Indiana in the early 1900's. There is much about farm life described by the author that is similar over these decades. Every one who grew up in the country or had immediate relation who did will find this a nostalgic trip back to a simpler albeit hard time on our history. Dwight Hoover has written an engrossing story of farm life during the Depression in Iowa. What I found especially fascinating was learning of the gradual phasing out of work horses over many years-it wasn't a sudden conversion to gas-powered vehicles. As a person raised in a big city (Chicago) that made sense as I thought about it.

The Great Depression in rural America, which began in the 1920s an. .Dwight W. Hoover describes his boyhood on a 100-acre Iowa family farm in the 1930s. The Iowa Highway Commission delivered a major blow with its decision to "construct a state highway through my father's farm," destroying the family's orchard. Our family, like his, moved from horse power (mule power in our case) to tractors.

Online version: Hoover, Dwight . 1926- Good day's work. Dwight Hoover, who grew up on an Iowa farm, recalls the events of day-to-day life in this era, offering detailed descriptions of daily work in each of the year's four seasons. Chicago : Ivan R. Dee, 2007 (OCoLC)609298181. Named Person: Dwight W Hoover; Dwight W Hoover; Dwight W Hoover. Material Type: Biography, Internet resource. He recalls the rough edges as well as the happy moments of rural life, offering a grim reminder of what it was like to be a child with adult responsibilities.

A Good Day’s Work: An Iowa Farm in the Great Depression by Dwight W. Indiana Magazine of History.

A Good Day's Work: An Iowa Farm in the Great Depression by Dwight W. Being born on an Iowa farm in the late 1920s, my memories of the early depression years are mostly hearsay. Little Heathens: Hard Times and High Spirits on an Iowa Farm During the Great Depression by Mildred Armstrong Kalish. I’m sure my parents were like other adults trying their best to maintain stability in their finances, as well as in the day to day activities. Homemade dresses were the haute couture for the females in the family.

The Great Depression in rural America, which began in the 1920s and lasted until World War II, made it still harder. At a time when tractors were replacing horses and the family farm was giving way to the large, single-crop enterprise, the struggle to survive and modernize in a period of economic scarcity was especially sharp.

Published by E. ET (October 2007). Dwight’s great grandfather settled in Iowa Territory in 1845 where he obtained well-watered and partly timbered land between the Skunk and Des Moines Rivers. Hoover, A Good Day’s Work: An Iowa Farm in the Great Depression. Chicago: Ivan R. Dee, 2007. There Dwight’s grandfather developed a 120-acre farm with the help of five sons. The latter also acquired farms and at Dwight’s birth in 1926 his father operated one hundred acres near Oskaloosa, Iowa.

Down and Out in the Great Depression. University of North Carolina Press, 1983.

Down and Out in the Great Depression. McElvaine, Robert S. The Great Depression: America 1929-1941.

Despite beautiful landscapes and bountiful harvests, farming is hard work and always has been. The Great Depression in rural America, which began in the 1920s and lasted until World War II, made it still harder. At a time when tractors were replacing horses and the family farm was giving way to the large, single-crop enterprise, the struggle to survive and modernize in a period of economic scarcity was especially sharp. In A Good Day's Work, Dwight Hoover, who grew up on an Iowa farm in this era, recalls the events of day-to-day life on a single farm, offering detailed descriptions of daily work in each of the year's four seasons. A Good Day's Work is a fascinating if grim reminder of what it was like to be a child with adult responsibilities. Mr. Hoover's unusual memoir recalls the rough edges as well as the happy moments of rural life. It is an honest re-creation of a world that was vanishing.
  • Flathan
A Good Day's Work Dwight W. Hoover

This book brought back many memories for me of visiting my older sister living on a farm in Indiana during the fifties. I also loved to hear my mother telling stories of growing up on a farm in Indiana in the early 1900's. There is much about farm life described by the author that is similar over these decades. He describes the hard work, the co-operation, family bond and the community spirit that seems to me to be a common thread throughout farm life. This book caused me to think about the family values and personal ethics that are less a part of our lives today as not only farming but other occupations have changed in the United States. The hard work, long days and financial uncertainty remain for those family farmers trying to continue the traditional way of farming in the mid-west. The author shares the right amount of antidotal stories that causes the reader to feel he/she knows this farm family. Sharing their experiences through the writing of one of the members of the Hoover family makes this book a joy to read.
  • Damand
Great anecdotal stories from an Iowa farm during the Great Depression. Every one who grew up in the country or had immediate relation who did will find this a nostalgic trip back to a simpler albeit hard time on our history.
  • Samut
Dwight Hoover has written an engrossing story of farm life during the Depression in Iowa. What I found especially fascinating was learning of the gradual phasing out of work horses over many years--it wasn't a sudden conversion to gas-powered vehicles. As a person raised in a big city (Chicago) that made sense as I thought about it. I remember as a little girl in the late'40s/early 50s a horse and cart parked on our street in the city. The book takes us through typical days and especially, typical seasons of farm life, describing in detail planting, cultivation and harvesting of crops. Using vivid details and choosing carefully what stories to tell, the author gives us a complete picture of what life was like when he was growing up.
  • Jediathain
I enjoyed this book. It is well written. I would recommend it to anyone who is interested in farm life in an earlier time. Amazingly, I found that even though I grew up in the 60's and early 70's in the South, the chores, responsibilities, social life, and family customs still resembled that described by Mr. Hoover in this book. Even though many improvements came about in the 40's and 50's to make life easier for rural residents, I believe we began to rapidly draw away from the culture so vividly described in this book somewhere around 1970. How sad. Look where it's gotten us today. An America we can hardly recognize. Thanks Mr. Hoover for writing a great book and for taking me back to the "good ole days".
  • krot
this is a lovely book telling about farm life in the 1930s-40s. It clearly explains farming practices that are part of the past-- the type of thing your parents, grandparents or great-grandparents did if they were farmers. Tells the story clearly and is an enjoyable read for those interested in what farm life was like in that era.
  • Thorgahuginn
Down to earth telling of an average lad's growing to manhood on a Midwest farm during the 1930s-40s. Well written and very readable.
  • Yananoc
If you are looking for a book about what it was like (sometimes in mind-numbing great detail) living on a farm during the depression years, this is the book for you. I was hoping for more of a "housewife" approach of life during the Depression years, and this book is clearly about FARMING.

If you are interested in the minute details of harrowing, plowing, cultivating, and the sizes of such farm implements back then, then you may really enjoy this book. I know my late father would have devoured every page! However, maybe I should have realized that memoirs written from a male's recollection would not have dwelt overmuch on the housewife's responsibilites on the farm. The author touched upon her duties here and there throughout his book, with the majority of his memories concentrating on the his family's daily field and farm work.

Like I said before, if you're looking for a book written almost strictly about the fieldwork during the Depression, you'd probably love this book.
I enjoyed this book very much. I grew up near where Mr. Hoover did, and in fact am one of the Dutch that he refers to (kindly) near the end of the book. I was a little surprised that Mr. Hoover did not know why sheep only lamb in the spring. In the Iowa climate (warm sultry summers) ewes only come into estrous in late September or early October. Other than that I found most of his memories to be spot on and although reported with an obvious respect and regard for the farming life, detailed without romanticizing the life beyond any semblance of authenticity.