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Download Rebel Sons of Erin: A Civil War Unit History of the Tenth Tennessee Infantry Regiment (Irish) Confederate States Volunteers eBook

by Ed Gleeson

Download Rebel Sons of Erin: A Civil War Unit History of the Tenth Tennessee Infantry Regiment (Irish) Confederate States Volunteers eBook
ISBN:
1878208241
Author:
Ed Gleeson
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Clerisy Pr (October 1, 1993)
Pages:
400 pages
EPUB book:
1988 kb
FB2 book:
1978 kb
DJVU:
1661 kb
Other formats
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Rating:
4.5
Votes:
725


Rebel Sons of Erin book. The Tenth Tennessee Infantry was a small but deadly regiment of expert rifelmen.

Rebel Sons of Erin book. The Tenth Tennessee Infantry was a small but deadly regiment of expert. Led by Colonel Randall McGavock, the unit inflicted heavy casualities on the Union Army in the West throughout the Civil War. Get A Copy.

A People's History of the United States: 1492 to Present. The Elements of Style.

The 15th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry was an infantry regiment from Tennessee that served with the Confederate States Army in the American Civil War. Among its notable battles were the Battle of Shiloh and the Battle of Chickamauga. Company G, of the regiment was composed largely of residents of states outside Tennessee.

Sons of Erin Assemble! A Glorious History The regiment was reported at Fort Henry in July, 1861, with 720 men .

Sons of Erin Assemble! A Glorious History The regiment was reported at Fort Henry in July, 1861, with 720 men, armed with flintlock muskets. Also present at Fort Henry in October, 1861 were Captain Jesse Taylor's Company of Artillery, and Captains Hambrick's and Bacot's companies of Colonel Nathan B. Forrest's Battalion of Cavalry. While there, Colonel James Mulligan, of the Federal Irish Brigade, wrote General Halleck that there were a good many Irishmen in the 10th Tennessee Infantry who wished to take the oath of allegiance and enlist in his forces. Permission to enroll prisoners was denied at this time.

The 154th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry was an infantry regiment from Tennessee that served with the Confederate States Army in the American Civil War. Raised originally in 1842 as the 154th Tennessee Militia it sought to retain its number and was as such also known as 154th (Senior) Tennessee Infantry (1st Tennessee Volunteers).

The 15th Regiment, Tennessee Infantry was an infantry regiment from Tennessee that served with the . Ed Gleeson, Illinois Rebels - A Civil War Unit History of G Company, 15th Tennessee Regiment Volunteer Infantry Guild Press of Indiana, 1996.

Gleeson, Ed. Varying Form of Title: Civil War unit history of the Tenth . United States History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. Varying Form of Title: Civil War unit history of the Tenth Tennessee Infantry Regiment (Irish) Confederate States Volunteers. Geographic Name: Tennessee History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site.

Stair na hÉireannIrish History, Irish-American HistoryAmerica, American Civil War, Confederate, General Patrick . Company D was known as the ‘Rebel Sons of Erin’ because so many of them were Irish

Stair na hÉireannIrish History, Irish-American HistoryAmerica, American Civil War, Confederate, General Patrick Cleburne, Ireland, Patrick Cleburne Painting by Richard R. Miller, Tenth Tennessee Infantry Regiment. Company D was known as the ‘Rebel Sons of Erin’ because so many of them were Irish. Indeed, the roster of Company D reads like any small town in a 19th century Irish village (every surname was Irish). Source TenthTennessee.

Confederate States Army. Regiment List of Tennessee Confederate Civil War units. a b Crute, Joseph H. Jr. (1987)

Confederate States Army. Part of. Maney's Brigade. Units of the Twenty-seventh Tennessee included:. List of Tennessee Confederate Civil War units. (1987). Units of the Confederate States Army (2nd e. Gaithersburg, M. Olde Soldier Books.

For an overall national.

For an overall national view see Bibliography of the American Civil War. On the Confederacy see Confederate States of America

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  • Xanzay
I'm from Erin TN and the western Middle TN area. Further, I'm of Protestant Irish descent on my father's side. My mother's genealogy is well documented includes a Sgt. Banks that fought under General Andrew Jackson in the war of 1812, known as the Indian Wars on the frontier. He married a Walker, which was the name of my great, great, great grandparents. There are also a Buckners related to my maternal grandmother but can't determine if related to Buckner from Fort Donelson and beyond. So, for those reasons and knowing the geography, much of it very well, having hiked and canoed it during my college and post military years of the early 70s, I found the book selfishly fascinating. I recommend it to any Civil War history enthusiast without hesitation. If you are from middle or west TN and wish to gain a depth of insight into the contribution of the men from that region it is a must read. The only caveat is that it may be a bit of a tedious read at times for those unfamiliar with military terms, especially maneuvers. Ed B. From Yellow Creek (Austin Peay, 1973)
  • Munigrinn
The "Rebel Sons of Erin" is a highly partisan history of the 10th Tennessee Infantry (Confederate). The 10th Tennessee was a hard luck regiment that was surrendered at Fort Donelson and lost many of its members who either swore an oath of allegiance to the Union or joined one of two Illinois (Union) regiments while in prison. The regiment was never the same after its exchange. A number of Union prisoners of war were recruited to join the 10th from Camp Lawton and Andersonville prison late in the Civil War, but were captured at Egypt Station before they could join the main body of the 10th. Most of the captured galvanized Yankees changed sides again and joined the 5th US Infantry. A second attempt to recruit Union prisoners of war for the regiment from Andersonville also ended in failure. Only a handful of soldiers from the 10th (Confederate) surrendered with Johnston's Army at the end of the war, with most lost to capture, changing sides, disease, and death or injury in battle. Gleeson assembled a good bit of information about the 10th, but ignored much of its less glamorous history while writing this book.
  • Doukree
I would recommend this to those interested in the War Between the States and lovers of history. Well written and kept my interest
  • Ttexav
I have scanned only a few pages, and find obvious errors. There was no "Father Darius HEBERT" in the western First Louisiana Infantry (Strawbridge's) or anywhere else in the Confederate chaplaincy, so he surely could not have been a friend of Fr. Emery Bliemel (p. 277). Father Darius HUBERT, a French-born Jesuit, served with the First Louisiana Infantry (Nelligan's) in the Army of Northern Virginia. So he certainly did not officiate at the hasty-held funeral of Fr. Bliemel in Georgia (p. 306).

Since these assertions are original to Gleeson, and offer no documentation, they show not only carelessness with research but a worrying capacity to invent details for his narrative.
  • Uttegirazu
this book deals with a little written about subject,a confederate regiment comprised of mainly Catholic Irishmen.It traces their record from Ft. Donelson to Bentonville.the book is notable because of what it doesn't say as well as what it does. Most of theses soldiers seemed to have little to any political views and joined up in defense of their lands and families,not really yankee-haters or sympathetic to southern slavery. when the war machine goes into gear they are caught in the machinery and sign up without much hesitation as southern patriots. Almost none of them own slaves or would even want to.What keeps them going is their loyalty to their country ,their religion,and each other.The book contains alot of anecdotal stories about the individuals in the book,like the heroism of Father Biemel,who ministered to the physical and spiritual needs of the men and paid the ultimate sacrifice.there is also alot of humor in the book,I particularly enjoyed the story of General John Bell Hood,the rebel General in charge of the defenses of Atlanta. Gleeson says of him that Hood became more agreesive on the attack the more body parts he lost.there are alot of human interest stories as well as a "where are they now",section which tracks down some of the alumi of the 10th Tennessee after the war.A wife of one of the commanders who was killed in battle more or less forgot her husband and later became a notorious nag.the drummer boy made it 1938 and some of these ex-confederates were actually able to get state veterans benefits for their widows.The book also deals with the subject of confederate desertion rates throughout the war and this factor definitely cut into the combat ability of the 10th.I was surprised at how many desertions occurred in the earlier part of the war as well as the later.