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Download Rise of the New York Skyscraper: 1865-1913 eBook

by Professor Sarah Bradford Landau,Carl W. Condit

Download Rise of the New York Skyscraper: 1865-1913 eBook
ISBN:
0300064446
Author:
Professor Sarah Bradford Landau,Carl W. Condit
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Yale University Press; First edition (April 24, 1996)
Pages:
496 pages
EPUB book:
1852 kb
FB2 book:
1527 kb
DJVU:
1815 kb
Other formats
docx mobi lrf mbr
Rating:
4.3
Votes:
435


Sarah Bradford Landau, Carl W. Condit.

Sarah Bradford Landau, Carl W. The invention of the New York skyscraper is one of the most fascinating developments in the history of architecture. This authoritative book chronicles the history of New York's first skyscrapers, challenging conventional wisdom that it was in Chicago and not New York that the skyscraper was born. Shelves: urbanism, history. Incredibly thorough look at the origin of skyscrapers in Manhattan.

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Главная Technology and Culture The Rise of the New York Skyscraper . Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Главная Technology and Culture The Rise of the New York Skyscraper, 1865-1913by Sarah Bradford Landau; Carl W. Technology and Culture 1997, 07 Vol. 38; Iss. 3. The Rise of the New York Skyscraper, 1865-1913by Sarah Bradford Landau; Carl W. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Technology in the Hospital: Transforming Patient Care in the Early Twentienth Centuryby Joel D. Howell.

The history of New York’s first skyscrapers is chronicled in this definitive book that shows, with the aid of 209 black and white photographs, drawings, and building plans, how the development of this new type of structure transformed the appearance and shape of the city. Detailed are the 1888 construction of the 13-story New York Times Building, which was erected around its 1857 predecessor; the Woolworth Building, whose owner, F. W. Woolworth, not only wanted the.

Similar books and articles. Carl Condit - 1975 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 66:125-126. Teaching the History of Science. Rise of the New York Skyscraper, 1865-1913 by Sarah Bradford Landau; Carl W. The Port of New York: A History of the Rail and Terminal System From the Beginnings to Pennsylvania Station by Carl W. Jeffrey Meikle - 1981 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 72:131-132. The Port of New York: A History of the Rail and Terminal System From the Grand Central Electrification to the Present by Carl W. Carl W. Condit - 1953 - Isis 44 (1/2):95-96.

Items related to Rise of the New York Skyscraper: 1865-1913. This prizewinning book chronicles the history of New York& first skyscrapers, challenging conventional wisdom that it was in Chicago, not New York, that the skyscraper was born. Landau, Professor Sarah Bradford; Condit, Carl W. Rise of the New York Skyscraper: 1865-1913. Drawing on rich contemporary sources to show how remarkable developments in commerce, land use, technology, design, and zoning law enabled architects and engineers to create the first tall buildings, the authors claim New York City was beyond doubt the birthplace of skyscraper form and construction techniques.

The Rise of the New York Skyscraper 1865-1913. Yale University Press.

Besides the books, Condit wrote numerous technical articles in scholarly journals and contributed to photographic books on Chicago buildings. D. Mancoff prepared a complete bibliography of his work in a special issue of the journal Technology and Culture devoted to essays in Condit's honor. The Rise of the New York Skyscraper 1865-1913.

by Sarah Bradford Landau and Carl W. A chronicle of the history of New York's first skyscrapers. As the title indicates, this book covers New York 'skyscrapers' (loosely-defined) from 1865 to 1913. It challenges the conventional wisdom that it was in Chicago, not in New York, that the skyscraper was born. The book begins with 5-story masonry buildings of the late 1800s and culminates with such landmarks as the Woolworth and Singer Buildings.

Rise of the New York Skyscraper, 1865-1913. Skyscraper photos of historic buildings can be black-and-white dull or amazingly colorful as we think about the truly awesome challenge of designing and constructing the early tall buildings. Historian Carl W. Condit (1914-1997) and Professor Sarah Bradford Landau have given us a fascinating look at the history of New York's tall buildings and the building boom in Manhattan in the late 1800s and early 1900s.

This work surveys the early days of the New York skyscraper up to 1913. It investigates the role of engineers in skyscraper construction, the evolution of the metal frame, fireproofing technology, and the relation of form and style features to site conditions and building code provisions.
  • Freighton
The title says it all. There was a time when the architectural world was convinced that skyscrapers were invented in Chicago and provided the solid stylistic base for the Modern Style. This book goes a long way toward both promoting its own set of skyscrapers and dispelling some of the myths concerning the Chicago school.

Professort Landau thoroughly discusses each tall building (usually considered to be "skyscrapers" in contemporary parlance) and their relationship within the entire milieu of the cultural scene in the latter half of the nineteenth century and pre-World War I years of the twentieth century in New York City. Thus it can be understood why the skyscrapers of New York City differed significantly from their cousins in Chicago. The engineering aspects of the buildings receive truly outstanding coverage.

I highly recommend this book not only for New Yorkers, but also for Midwesterners such as myself whose view might be otherwise clouded by the Chicago School.
  • Wire
This is more than a book... I would call a treaty on the earliest skyscrapers. The authors go deep into the hustory of the first tall buildings in new York, writing extensively about the architecture and the structural systems of the buildings. That is the focus of the book, really, the engineering part. Developers, owners and people involved are mentioned, but the authors do not aboujd on the social history of the buildings. Rather, they present a cronology of engineering and structural technics on how the buildings got taller and bigger in the 50 years the book covers.
Also, interestingly enough, the authors debunk the popular idea that it was Chicago where the first skyscraper was built. Armed with powerful arguments, they present the Equitable building in New York, built in 1870, as the first building to have all the characteristics that would qualify it as the first true skyscraper. Sorry Chicago! The arguments are solid...
  • Love Me
Great book on the early history!
  • Onaxan
As the title indicates, this book covers New York 'skyscrapers' (loosely-defined) from 1865 to 1913. The book begins with 5-story masonry buildings of the late 1800s and culminates with such landmarks as the Woolworth and Singer Buildings. The authors highlight the technical angle, and explain the developments that occurred in steel framing, foundations, and elevators, although the exterior aesthetics of these buildings also receive attention. Some space is allocated to hotels and apartment buildings; however, most of the book is devoted to office buildings. Best of all are the magnificent period photographs of early high-rises, about a hundred in all. Also, there are twenty floor plans.
  • Ť.ħ.ê_Ĉ.õ.о.Ł
As a practicing Structural Engineer in California, I was involved in a project that required rapid determination of structural systems of buildings in and around New York City based on viewing photographs. This book, along with "Historical Building Construction" by Friedman, provided a fairly complete description of structural systems used over the years in the New York area. I would imagine that the audience for both books would tend to be primarily architects, engineers, or other construction professionals but both books have useful bits of information that might be interesting to even the layperson that just enjoys buildings.

Doug Silver, S.E.
Los Angeles, CA
  • Prince Persie
I am a very apassionated researcher about the development of the great American and Latin American cities. I have found this book very useful for my researchs, with a very great amount of information and a very serious investigation on the issue . The main critic I have found is that the same thing could have been done in a more narrative and amusing way, to keep the reader interested in the reading.The story of New York has been dinamic and full of force, and nothing of that has been reflected on this book. Outside of that, I have really learned a lot about the issue, and it has really been very useful for my own investigations about the issue. I am an architect with a Master on Urban Economics in Buenos Aires, and all this literature is really important for my researchs.