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Download The French-Canadian Heritage in New England eBook

by Gerard J. Brault

Download The French-Canadian Heritage in New England eBook
ISBN:
0773505377
Author:
Gerard J. Brault
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
McGill-Queen's University Press (January 1, 1986)
Pages:
314 pages
EPUB book:
1880 kb
FB2 book:
1635 kb
DJVU:
1995 kb
Other formats
lrf lit azw mobi
Rating:
4.1
Votes:
401


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If anyone is interested in their New England French Canadian history as I am, then this is a perfect book to. .Although written more than twenty years ago, Gerard Brault's book offers the Franco-American a glimpse into the past, a past many want to know about.

If anyone is interested in their New England French Canadian history as I am, then this is a perfect book to expand your knowledge and understanding of the time and culture of the Great Canadian French Migration to the United States. But only if you approach the book willing and expecting to be taught rather than to be entertained. When he was visiting Reims in 1952, he suddenly noticed the inscription on a sculpture, "Jean Qu pleure et Jean qui ri.

Start by marking The French-Canadian Heritage in New England as Want to Read . Brault mentions in passing that almost 20,000 people had already come by 1850 though, and I'd like to know a little more about them. They might be harder to track.

Start by marking The French-Canadian Heritage in New England as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I guess I probably was less interested because I have already read so much about the Acadians, and wanted more about the people who emigrated to the Saint Laurence Valley. for selfish reasons, since they were my people).

French Canadians came to New England individually or in small family groups.

Published by: McGill-Queen's University Press. This book is about the French Canadians who moved to New England beginning a little over a century ago. The migration was massive but of relatively short duration, lasting only about sixty years. French Canadians came to New England individually or in small family groups. Except for the relatively small number who, in troubled 1830s, fled Quebec because of the Patriote Rebellion-nearly the insurrectionists were eventually repatriated-the immigrants came their own initiative seeking to improve their lot.

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Brault, Gerard J. (March 15, 1986), The French-Canadian Heritage in New England, University Press of New England, pp. 312 pages, ISBN 0-87451-359-6. Bumsted, J. M (2003), Canada's diverse peoples: a reference sourcebook, Library of Congress ( ABC-CLIO), ISBN 1-57607-672-5. Cohen, Andrew (2008), The Unfinished Canadian: The People We Are, Emblem ed, ISBN 978-0-7710-2286-9.

Are you sure you want to remove The French-Canadian heritage in New England from your list? The French-Canadian heritage in New England

Are you sure you want to remove The French-Canadian heritage in New England from your list? The French-Canadian heritage in New England. Published 1986 by University Press of New England, McGill-Queen's University Press in Hanover, Kingston. In library, French-Canadians, History.

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French Canadians are an ethnic group who trace their ancestry to French colonists who settled in Canada from the 17th century onward

French Canadians are an ethnic group who trace their ancestry to French colonists who settled in Canada from the 17th century onward.

University Press of New England.

This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. The French-Canadian Heritage in New England. University Press of New England.

Brault has ably managed to weave the dual history of French Canadians -- Acadians and Québécois -- into the fabric of his account of the history and development of Franco-American culture and its contemporary situation. Drawing upon historical works and the literature of the period, the author provides a detailed description of early life in Quebec and Acadia and analyses the forces which led to migration in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Brault is himself an American of French-Canadian descent. A brief account of his own family history provides important insights into the experience of being Franco-American, and offers a perspective from which it is possible to understand how members of this group can feel close to Canada and to France while remaining solidly and patriotically American.
  • Najinn
I bought his book because all of my grandparents immigrated to New England from Québec, and faced the challenges and enjoyed the advantages that America had to offer back in the late 1800's. Challenges and advantages that each hardly exist any longer. I've always been interested in my French Canadian heritage and have traced my family history hundreds of year back through Québec; "The French Canadian heritage In New England" seemed to be a book that I would thoroughly enjoy. And I did to a certain extent. The book is chock full of discussions of the difficult conditions faced by the French Canadians in fitting in to the New England social structure, and does a good job of describing the cultural differences and adjustments that had to be made. I found myself more than once nodding in agreement with the book, or having a light bulb go off in my head as something I read in the book triggered a story from y own family history.

My only complaint -- and probably not a legitimate one -- is that this was a difficult book to read; not one that you could just curl up with to pass a rainy afternoon. It's written in textbook-type prose with charts and statistics so don't expect an easy read. The author was obviously a master of well-researched cold, hard facts and was writing to present this as an educational vehicle rather than as a warm and fuzzy book about your great-grandmother's French Canadian culture. Expect this book to be more of an intellectual learning experience than an emotional journey into the past.

If anyone is interested in their New England French Canadian history as I am, then this is a perfect book to expand your knowledge and understanding of the time and culture of the Great Canadian French Migration to the United States. But only if you approach the book willing and expecting to be taught rather than to be entertained.
  • Watikalate
I grew up within a mile of the northern RI French-Canadian village of Albion, whose culture once centered on the textile mill industry alongside the Blackstone River in Massachusetts and northern Rhode Island. A number of my childhood friends' family histories reach back to the immigration of French Canadians from Quebec and the surrounding rural areas to New England. That said, I found this book helpful in gaining appreciation of the forces and dynamics behind French-Canadian heritage in New England, which in early 20th century was considerable. For readers who ever travel near Woonsocket, RI, I highly recommend visiting Museum of Work and Culture downtown, whose entire focus is on the French-Canadian influx and textile mill village culture 100 plus years ago. It is hard learning about 8 year old girls working 12 hour days 6 days a week, and being subject to the hazards and awful conditions of mill life, being paid a pittance for their work. Mill owners were in cahoots with the priests of the Catholic parishes in "keeping the workers in line" with Sunday sermons preaching obedience to authority at every turn (both church and commercial authority). The book is not entirely well constructed, that is, I like its parts better than its aggregate format. But when taken in chunks (reading parts of it at a sitting) one appreciates the central role of Catholicism and pride in French-Canadian origins among the mill workers. Interestingly enough, over 40% returned home to Canada having soured on American life. Another interesting aspect is the friction between French-Canadian parishes and Irish Catholic priests who were sometimes appointed to those parishes. The chemistry was really bad, in many cases those priests were reassigned to Irish-Catholic parishes. Originally published in 1986, the author, Gerald J. Brault is/was a Professor French at Penn State University. I would recommend reading this book with the understanding that it is somewhat dry and statistical in places. It is unquestionably well documented and scholarly, perhaps, too much so. Including even more excerpts of individual family experiences would bolster the readability of the book, although to the author’s credit there are a number of individual family anecdotes already within the text. I am glad I purchased it. It is sort of a “niche book” focusing on a specific slice of New England culture now well into its third or fourth generation.