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Download The Prophet and Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the International Community, and Haiti (Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective) (Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective Series) eBook

by Alex Dupuy

Download The Prophet and Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the International Community, and Haiti (Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective) (Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective Series) eBook
ISBN:
0742538311
Author:
Alex Dupuy
Category:
Americas
Language:
English
Publisher:
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. (December 7, 2006)
Pages:
260 pages
EPUB book:
1261 kb
FB2 book:
1516 kb
DJVU:
1939 kb
Other formats
docx mbr lrf doc
Rating:
4.6
Votes:
225


Series: Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective Series. Paperback: 258 pages. The Prophet and Power is a no-nonsense book, which is inevitably both its greatest strength and weakness.

Series: Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective Series. Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers (December 7, 2006). Dupuy includes no superfluous material: there are no emotional stories or sub-plots.

The Prophet and Power book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Prophet and Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the International Community, and Haiti as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

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This compelling book offers a comprehensive analysis of the struggle for democracy .

This compelling book offers a comprehensive analysis of the struggle for democracy in Haiti, set in the context of the tumultuous rise and fall of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. To maintain power, Aristide relied on armed gangs, the police, and authoritarian practices. That strategy failed and his foreign-backed foes overthrew and exiled him once again in 2004. This time, however, the population did not rally in his defense. php:8 Stack trace: gLayer. File: PDF, 1. 0 MB. Читать онлайн. php(57): ggLayer- {closure}(Object(ggLayer), Array) /.

Swept to power in 1991 as the champion of Haiti's impoverished majority . Series: Critical Currents in Latin American Perspective Series.

Swept to power in 1991 as the champion of Haiti's impoverished majority and their demand for a more just, equal, and participatory democratic society, the charismatic ent was overthrown by the military just seven months into his first term. Popular resistance to the junta compelled the United States to lead a multinational force to restore Aristide to power in 1994 to serve out the remainder of his presidency until 1996.

Alex Dupuy, Franck Laraque. This compelling book offers a comprehensive analysis of the struggle for democracy in Haiti, set in the context of the tumultuous rise and fall of Jean-Bertrand Aristide. Swept to power in 1991 as the champion of Haiti's impoverished majority and their demand for a more just, equal, and participatory democratic society, the charismatic ent was overthrown by the military just seven months into his first term.

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oceedings{Dupuy2006ThePA, title {The Prophet and Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the .

oceedings{Dupuy2006ThePA, title {The Prophet and Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the International Community, and Haiti}, author {Alex Dupuy}, year {2006} }. Alex Dupuy.

Latin American Politics and Society. Alex Dupuy, The Prophet and the Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the International Community, and Haiti. New York: Rowman and Littlefield, 2007.

This compelling book offers a comprehensive analysis of the struggle for democracy in Haiti, set in the context of the tumultuous rise and fall of JeanBertrand Aristide. Swept to power in 1991 as the champion of Haiti's impoverished majority and their demand for a more just, equal, and participatory democratic society, the charismatic priestturnedpresident was overthrown by the military just seven months into his first term. Popular resistance to the junta compelled the United States to lead a multinational force to restore Aristide to power in 1994 to serve out the remainder of his presidency until 1996. When he was reelected for a second and final term in 2000, Aristide had undergone a dramatic transformation. Expelled from the priesthood and no longer preaching liberation theology, his real objective was to consolidate his and his Lavalas party's power and preserve the predatory state structures he had vowed to dismantle just a decade earlier. To maintain power, Aristide relied on armed gangs, the police, and authoritarian practices. That strategy failed and his foreignbacked foes overthrew and exiled him once again in 2004. This time, however, the population did not rally in his defense.
  • Chinon
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  • unmasked
Here, Dupuy offers a lightening-paced analysis of the rise and fall of Aristide, with special attention given to international context surrounding events in Haiti. He starts by explaining that the election of liberation theologian Aristide broke with the traditional "pact of domination" between the occupiers of the state government, the Haitian bourgeoisie, and the multi-national and international allies of the Washington Consensus, none of whom paid any regard to Haiti's impoverished masses. If Aristide and his Lavalas government were going to make any progress and stay in power, they would have had to entice the already-skeptical Haitian bourgeoisie and, with them, maybe even the international community, into a new pact of domination, which could safeguard his government from the neo-Duvalierists and their ad hoc, ever-enlargening alliance.

Dupuy argues that, although Aristide, from the onset, had a multitude of enemies, his occasional contradictory, authoritarian behavior spoiled any opportunity to form a new pact of domination with the bourgeoisie. Dupuy backs his thesis by citing Aristide's sometimes-threatening tone when addressing the bourgeoisie, his support of mob violence (Père Lebrun) when necessary, his party's occasional non-democratic behavior (e.g. P.M. Préval ignoring a National Assembly summoning), his increasing reliance on the chimès armed gangs, etc. According to Dupuy, all of this, even though most of it was brought on by the opposition's non-cooperative pressures, served only to exacerbate his opponents' pre-existing aversion to the Lavalas movement, thus strengthening the alliance of the old pact of domination and its will to rid Haiti of Aristide.

Dupuy has written a very strong, and fair, book. He clearly sympathizes most with Aristide's original social-democratic ambitions--he makes several hearty jabs at USAID and the International Republican Institute. (This is not at all an anti-Aristide book.) However, at the same time, he has made great effort to step back and acknowledge that wrongs were being committed and mistakes were being made on everyone's part. The author has also done considerable thinking about the Aristide crisis in context to world history and globalization; tidbits of his vocabulary resonate with Marxist and Dependista development theory; also expect to find references to ideas of the likes of David Harvey, David Nicholls, and others. The author's continual use of conjecture--what if...--if Aristide had done this...--however, at times, was slightly too excessive.

The Prophet and Power is a no-nonsense book, which is inevitably both its greatest strength and weakness. The paperback edition is 200 pages of intense analysis, making it a good choice for a college-course reading assignment. Dupuy includes no superfluous material: there are no emotional stories or sub-plots. While this may come as a relief to those serious readers who are finishing up Deibert's 450-pager, there are certainly elements that are in no way superfluous but, apparently, didn't make the cut and find a way into this book. The most disappointing case of this, I felt, is the complete omission of the Dominican Republic's role in the international fiasco surrounding Aristide. Despite this, Dupuy's book is very good, better than any I have recently read; and I encourage you to read it.